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LIBRARY 

THS  MUSEUM 
OF  frftiDERN  AHT 


Receivea: 


Scanned  from  the  collection  of 

The  Museum  of  Modern  Art  Library 


Coordinated  by  the 

Media  History  Digital  Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 


Funded  by  a  donation  from 
Domitor 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2012  with  funding  from 

Media  History  Digital  Library 


http://archive.org/details/cinenewgaz01cine 


FU  PL 


February,    1912. 


THK    CINEMA. 


DO    you   want    a    Perfect    Program    and    a    Perfect   Picture  ? 
If  you  do,  show  these  films  with  a  Brockliss-Motiograph. 


THE     CINEMA. 


February,  1912. 


HOUSE. 


SALES  DEPARTMENT  .  .  Ground  Floor 


HIRE 


M 


COUNTING  HOUSE 
and  DRAWING  OFFICE 

MACHINE  WORKSHOP. 

DARK  ROOMS 

DRYING  ROOM,  &c. 


•     ■     ■     ■ 


.    Basement 

.  First  Floor 

Second  Floor 

,  Third  Floor 

Fourth  Floor 


G&  WILLIAMSON 

K!NFMATOO.R\PH  OK 


THE 


WILLIAMSON 

KINEMATOGRAPH    Co.,   Ltd., 

28,  Denmark  Street,  Charing  Gross  Road,  London,  W.G. 


Telegrams:   Kinetogram.  London. 


Telephone:  Central  7393. 


THE    CINEMA    NEWS   AND   PR6PERTV   QAZBTTB,   FlItUAItV     1012 


WESTERN 


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[  London, 


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treet,  W. 


Trade  Mark. 


NEWS    AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE. 

A  MONTHLY  MAGAZINE  OF  IMPORTANCE  TO  ALL  INTERESTED  IN  THE  CINEMATOGRAPH  WORLD 

Edited    bv    Low    Warren. 


No.  1.    Vol.  I. 


FEBRUARY,    1912. 


Registered. 


Price  One  Penny, 

By  Post,  2d. 


EDITORIAL   AND   BUSINESS   NOTICES. 

THE  CINEMA  News  and  Property  Gazette  is  published  on  the  first  of  each 
inonih.  Copies  can  be  obtained  through  any  Newsagent  or  Railway  Bookstall 
in  Town  or  Country,  or  will  be  sent  direct  from  the  Office  for  2s.  per  annum, 
post  free. 

News  items  of  interest  to  those  engaged  in  the  Cinematograph  Industry  will  be 
welcomed,  and  communications  should  reach  the  Office  not  later  ttun  the  26th 
of  the  monih,  if  intended  for  publication  In  the  following  month's  issue. 
Articles,  photographs  or  drawings  intended  f  r  publication  must  be  accompanied 
by  a  stamped  addressed  envelope,  in  case  of  return,  but  the  Editor  will  not  be 
responsible  for  ihe  sfe  return  of  rejected  MS.,  photographs  or  drawings,  though 
every  care  will  be  taken  of  them. 

Editorial  communications,  which  should  always  be  accompanied  by  the  name 
and  address  of  the  sender,  should  be  addressed  to  the   Editor. 


WHOLESALE    AGENTS: 

LONDON  :— YV.  H.  Smith  &  Sons,  Strand,  W.C.;  Willing  &  Co.  Ltd., 
70,  St.  Martin's  Lane,  W.C. ;  E.  Marlbouotgh  &  Co..  51.  Old 
Bailey,  E.C. ;  Geo.  Vickeks,  172,  Strand,  W.C. 

MANCHESTER:—  W.  H.  Smith  &  Sons;  John  Heywood  &  Sons- 
Deansgate  ;  Abel  Heywood  &  Sons. 

AUSTRALIA: — Harrington  S:  Co.,  Sydney,  Brisbane,  Melbourne  and 
Adelaide. 

NEW  ZEALAND  :— Harrington  &  Co.,  Auckland  and  Wellington. 

CANADA:— The  Imperial  News  Co..  Ltd. 


All   enquiries    respecting    Advertisements    and    Business    matters    should    be 
addressed  to  the  Manager,  at  the  Offices  of  The  Cinema: 

21,  North  Audley  St.,  Oxford  Street,  W. 

Wires:  "  Faddist,  London."  Phones:  Gerrard  7676  &  H79K 


FROM  OUR  STANDPOINT. 


A    FOREWORD. 

TO-DAY    The    Cinema  makes  its  appearance  in  response 
to   many   requests   from   the   various   brandies   of  the 
Cinematograph  Industry. 
Its  pages  will  appeal  to  the  Trade  as  a  whole,  and  we 
shall   make   it  our   special    business   to   safeguard    the 
interests,  and  serve  to  the  best  of  our  ability,  the  factor,  the  renter, 
the  appliance   manufacturer,  the   theatre    proprietor,  the  manager. 
the  operator  and  the  asssistant. 

All  are  agreed  that  the  interests  of  the  industry  have  not  been  as 
carefully  studied  or  protected  as  fully  as  they  might  have  been  in 
the  past.  It  will  be  our  endeavour  to  remedy  this  state  of  things 
as  far  as  possible. 


Our  policy  will  be  one  of  outspoken  criticism  where  criticism  is 
necessary,  for  no  industry  can  hope  to  thrive  or  make  healthy 
progress,  unless  faults,  where  they  exist,  are  pointed  out  to  those 
responsible  for  remedying  them.  In  this  respect  The  Cinema 
hopes  to  be  of  real  service  to  the  Trade.  We  are  identified  with 
no  particular  interest  ;  we  are  ready  to  serve  all  equally  well  We 
stand  for  independence  of  thought  and  originality  of  idea,  and  we 
shall  not  fail  to  express  our  opinions  freely — at  times  perhaps  very 
freely — when  we  think  such  a  course  is  in  the  best  interest  of  the 
industry  we  seek  to  serve. 

Where  antagonism  is  being  fostered — and  there  are  signs  as  we 
write  that,  the  interests  of  the  business  are  being  jeopardised  in  at 
least  one  direction— we  shall  put  up  a  strong  and  determined 
opposition,  and  with  the  co-operation  of  our  many  friends  in  the 
Trade,  those  who  are  opposed  to  us  will  find  that  the  combined 
forces  of  the  Cinematograph  World,  are  a  power  to  be  reckoned 
with. 

The  faddists  here,  there  and  everywhere  on  our  local  boards, 
councils,  and  even  in  Parliament,  will  have  to  learn  to  moderate 
their  views  in  regard  to  the  picture  theatre.  The  question  of 
Sunday  closing  must  be  put  upon  a  proper  basis.  Such  points  of 
paramount  importance  to  the  Trade  as  the  non-flam  film  will  be 
decided  in  the  near  future,  and  upon  that  decision  depends  much  of 
the  future  success  of  the  business.  Further  legislation  is  necessary 
to  clearly  define  this  and  other  matters  at  present  very  much  in 
doubt,  and  open  to  individual  interpretation  and  misconstruction. 
Then  there  are  the  onerous  provisions  made  by  the  London  County 
Council  as  regards  new  buildings  and  existing  ones. 

The  Trade  must  make  itself  felt.  Where  are  our  representatives 
on  these  governing  bodies  ?  Where  are  oui  Members  representing 
us  in  Parliament 5  They  must  be  plainly  told  that  they  will  have  to 
study  us  somewhat  more  than  they  have  been  doing  of  late,  and  be 
made  to  realise  that  the  Cinematograph  Trade  can  control  an 
enormous  number  of  votes.  Indifference  to  our  most  reasonable 
and  just  requirements  will  make  a  big  difference  to  them  when  they 
next  seek  the  suffrages  of  their  constituents.  Such  a  campaign  as 
we  have  outlined  means  organising,  and  we  shall  hope  to  take  our 
place  in  the  forefront  of  the  fray  if  there  is  to  be  a  fight,  and  we 
have  already  commenced  to  lay  our  plans  accordingly. 

Finally,  let  us  say  that  The  Cinema  will  stand  for  all  that  is 
sanest  and  best  among  the  higher  ideals  of  present-day  cinemato- 
graphy. As  an  art  it  already  stands  high,  but  it  needs  lifting  from 
the  mechanical  rut  to  a  higher  level  among  its  kindred  professions 

Assured  from  the  outset  of  the  help  and  co-operation  of  the 
inte  lectual  forces  of  the  Trade  we  feel  that  the  high  ideals  which 
we  shall  do  our  best  to  foster  in  these  pages,  will  have  a  direct  and 
most  beneficial  effect  upon  this  new  world-force  in  the  expression 
of  Art, 


THE   CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


THE    NEWS    OF     THE    MONTH 

AT    A     GLANCE. 

THERE  was  a  Royal  Command  Performance  at  Calcutta 
of  Durbar  pictures,  and  according  to  advices  to  hand, 
Royalty  was  delighted  at  the  opportunity  of  seeing 
itself  in  the  magnificent  series  of  pictures  thrown  on 
the  screen.  These  depicted  every  important  event 
included  in  the  Royal  visit. 

A  new  picture  theatre  with  the  attractive  title  of  "The  Lounge," 
has  been  constructed  at  Cliftonville.  Margate.    It  seats  550  persons. 

The  M.  &  C.  Manufacturing  Co.,  have  decided  to  he  known  in 
future  as  the  "  Curtis  Manufacturing  Co." 

The  new  Picture  Theatre  to  be  built  on  the  site  of  the  old  Globe 
Restaurant  in  Coventry  Street,  \\\.  will  be  opened  in  May. 

One  American  picture  film-making  firm  has  7,000  costumes  of  all 
countries  in  stock,  as  against  171  in  1900. 

With  regret  we  announce  the  death  from  appendicitis,  of  Mr. 
Phillips,  of  Phillips  &  Price's  Electric  Theatre,  Swansea. 

Ne\vcastle-on-Tyne  is  to  have  two  more  electric  theatres  in  the 
central  part  of  the  town,  both  to  seat  over   r,ooo  persons. 

Mr.  Chas.  Urban  has  returned  from  India  with  the  complete 
series  of  kinemacolor  film  of  the  Durbar  The  first  exhibition  will 
be  at  the  Scala — February  5th. 

A  special  private  cinematograph  outfit  has  been  installed  in  the 
Palace  for  the  exclusive  use  of  the  Roumanian  Royal  Family  and 
their  suite. 

■'The  old  order  changeth  !  "  A  new  picture  palace  is  being 
erected  at  Evesham  on  a  site  that  was  recently  a  cycle  showroom, 
but  previouslv  a  chapel  and  a  parochial  hall. 

The  Pathe  Cinema  Palace  is  exhibiting  the  latest  topical  film.  It 
shows  how  the  recent  mysterious  bank  messenger  robbery  in  Paris 
was  carried  out 

Langholm  Town  Council  have  granted  a  conditional  license  to 
Messrs.  Milligan  Bros.,  on  behalf  of  Buccleuch  Hall,  Langholm. 
Seating  capacity  1,000  persons. 

Mr.  R.  Chambers  is  leaving  the  Court  Theatre,  Totttenham 
Court  Road,  W.,  to  manage  a  new  house  at  Peckham,  belonging  to 
the  same  circuit. 

The  takings  of  French  theatres  last  year  were  /  1.320,000.  a 
quarter  of  that  sum  being  made  up  bv  cinema  houses.  This  state- 
ment is  based  upon  official  statistics. 

New  cinematograph  theatres  are  in  process  of  construction  at 
Eastbourne,  Worthing,  Kirbv  in-Ashfield.  Batley,  Broughton, 
West  Bromwich  and  Bury. 

A  well-known  personality  in  the  North  has  been  removed  by  the 
death  of  Mr.  George  J.  Melvin,  at  the  age  of  46.  Mr.  Melvin  was 
well  known  as  the  pioneer  of  the  cinematograph  theatre  in  Arbroath. 

South-Eastern  Pictures,  Limited,  have  opened  a  theatre  in  Rye 
Lane,  Peckham,  with  a  seating  capacity  01640.  This  makes  the 
eighth  picture  house  in  the  district. 

The  Hammersmith  Borough  Council  rejected  a  proposition  to 
urge  the  L.C.C.  that  the  unrestricted  licensing  of  premises 
under  the  1907  Cinematograph  Act  was  undesirable,  and  should  be 
subordinate  to  local  requirements. 

The  Education  Committee  of  Flintshire  is  perturbed  over  the 
disinclination  of  the  local  youth  to  attend  evening  continuation 
classes.  They  cited  the  cinematograph  shows,  amongst  other  lures, 
as  being  parti}-  responsible. 

Glasgow  is  soon  going  to  have  religious  services  with  cinemato- 
graph pictures  (in  Sunday  evenings  These  are  being  provided  as 
a  counter  attraction  to  the  cinema  shows,  whose  Sunday  per- 
formances the  Glasgow  church  folk  have  been  opposing, 

At  the  Scala  Theatre,  Messrs.  Charles  Urban  &  Co.  are  present- 
ing "GSdipus  Rex  "  in  Kinemacolour  This  is  given  with  beautiful 
scenic  effects. 


IHs  Majesty's  Picture    Palace,   Eastville,   Bristol,   was   recently 

opened,  the  cos:  of  the   building  having  exceeded  ^"3,000.     It  has 

seating   capacity  for  over   800    persons,    and    Mr.    Gilpin    is    the 
manager. 

More  Theatres!  One  about  to  be  built  at  Teddington,  one  al 
Dalston,  and  two  at  Haillsden.  As  for  Manchester  -the  Watch 
Committee  have  licensed  seventeen  in  the  last  vear.  in  addition  to 
the  forty  odd  now  running! 

It  is  almost  worth  while  being  a  criminal  in  the  States.  Moving 
picture  shows  and  military  drill  are  being  provided  to  keep  the 
inhabitants  of  the  Indiana  State  Prison  from  being  bored  during 
their  visit 

The  Gaumont  Film  Hire  Service  will  shortly  open  a  new  branch 
at  57.  John  Bright  Street,  Birmingham.  The  office  will  be 
equipped  with  everv  requisite  pertaining  to  cinematography. 
They  are  also  opening  a  branch  at  Cardiff  in  the  near  future. 

The  New  Mills  magistrates  have  only  renewed  the  license  of  a 
local  picture  theatre  upon  the  understanding  that  in  future,  boxing 
contests  should  not  take  place.  It  had  been  elicited  during  the 
hearing  that  in  some  cases  the  hall  had  been  used  for  boxing 
contests. 

The  Princes  Theatre,  Llandudno,  hail  a  narrow  escape  of  being 
burned  down  the  other  morning,  but  luckily  a  cleaner  noticed 
smoke  pouring  out  of  one  of  the  dressing  rooms  and  was  able  to 
give  the  alarm  The  fire  was  easilv  got  under  control  and  business 
as  usual  was  resumed  in  the  evening. 

A  private  demonstration  was  recently  given  by  Captain  Otto 
Fulton  (Legion  of  Frontiersmen)  of  a  new  apparatus  for  the  pro- 
jection of  coloured,  still  or  animated  photographs.  The  entire 
process  is  a  new  one  and,  as  no  celluloid  film  is  used,  may  prove 
of  service  for  use  in  unlicensed  halls. 

The  Edison  Company  have  entered  into  an  arrangement  with 
Sir  Gilbert  Parker,  M.P.,  for  the  production  of  his  novels  on  the 
cinematograph.  Sir  Gilbert  may  himself  give  assistance  to  this 
end.  The  same  Companv  announces,  in  connection  with  the 
Dickens  Centenary,  film  pictures  of  "  Martin  Chuzzlewit,"  which 
will  last  nearly  an  hour. 

A  combined  programme  of  cinematography,  varied  with  songs. 
distinguished  the  opening  of  the  Trocadero  Cinematograph,  in  the 
V  M  C  A.  Hall,  Aberdeen.  Both  the  matinee  and  the  two  houses 
in  the  evening  were  well  patronized,  and  under  the  genial  manage- 
ment of  Mr.  Cavanagh.'the  entertainments  are  sine  to  be  a  great 
success. 

Brighton  Town  Council  has  decided  to  prohibit  Sunday  Picture 
Shows,  and  in  reply  to  a  question  the  Town  Clerk  stated  that  it 
was  impossible  to  insert  in  the  licenses  a  clause  prohibiting  the 
use  of  non-flam  films.  It  may  be  chance  or  it  may  be  design  -but 
on  the  same  agenda  the  Municipality  was  proposing  to  run  Sunday 
Orchestral  Concerts  ! 

The  new  electric  sign  outside  the  "  Grand  Cinema  "  in  the  Strand 
is  one  of  the  brightest  advertising  ideas  evolved  Two  clowns 
outlined  in  electric  lights  throw  electric  balls  to  one  another — the 
balls  forming  the  word  "Cinema"  in  their  journey.  Crowds 
collect  on  the  pavement  to  watch  the  sign,  which  is  a  distinct  money- 
getter. 

Sir  Stafford  Howard  and  Lady  Howard  on  their  return  to 
Llanelly,  after  their  honeymoon,  attended  a  performance  at 
Haggar's  Theatre,  when  the  chief  feature  of  the  programme  was 
a  series  of  cinematograph  pictures  of  the  wedding  ceremony,  which 
took  place  in  September.  Lady  and  Sir  Stafford  Howard  after- 
wards appeared  on  the  stage,  when  Mr.  Haggar  presented  the  film 
to  them  as  a  wedding  present. 

On  the  occasion  of  the  recent  visit  ol  the  American  engineers  to 
Coventry,  Messrs.  Rudge-W'hitw orth.  Ltd.,  carried  out  at  their 
works  in  the  presence  of  the  visitors  a  test  ot  wood  wheels  versus 
wire  wheels.  A  cinematograph  film  was  taken  of  the  operation, 
and   Messrs.  Rudge-W'hitworth  are  prepared  to  loan  the  film  upon 


February,    1912. 


THE    CINEMA. 


•equest  to  automobile  clubs  who  may  be  arranging  lectures, 
concerts,  etc..  at  which  such  a  film  could  be  exhibited. 

The  successful  and  popular  cinema  theatre  in  Lordship  Lane, 
Wood  Green,  recently  celebrated  its  second  anniversary.  Since 
the  opening  day,  two  years  ago,  neither  management  nor  start  have 
changed,  and  recently,  the  popular  manager.  Mr.  Tom  Mercer. 
was  granted  a  whole  day  as  a  benefit.  Mr.  Mercer  is  deservedly 
popular  in  the  neighbourhood  and  puts  on  a  splendid  continuous 
performance  without  break  of  any  kind. 

Despite    opposition    from    the    Northern    Theatres    Company, 

Limited,  proprietors  of  the  Bury  Theatre  and  Circus,  Messrs. 
Broadhead  (the  Hippodrome),  the  Bury  Cinematograph  Company. 
Limited,  the  Temperance  Billiard  Hail  Company,  the  Theatrical 
Managers'  Association,  and  a  number  of  clergy  and  nonconformists 
in  the  town,  the  Bury  Town  Council  has  granted  a  cinematograph 
licence  to  the  Castle  Skating  Kink,  Bury 

The  spirit  of  Cromwell's  Ironsides,  and  a  general  outlook  on  lite, 
suitable  some  three  hundred  years  ago.  is  displayed  by  the  Flint- 
shire Cakinistic  Methodist  Presbytery.  Hiey  have  asked  the 
Hollywell  Urban  District  Council  to  withdraw  licenses  from  all 
travelling  shows  and  cinematographs  unless  they  undertake  not  to 
open  on  Sundays.  The  H.U.D.Q  is  complying  as  far  as  possible 
with  this  demand. 

Messrs.  Brierley  &  Co..  the  well  known  film  service  (inn  of 
Brewer  Street,  W.,  have  recently  become  the  owners  ot  the 
Hotspur  Electric  Theatre,  Tottenham.  The  Theatre  has  been 
entirely  redecorated  and  many  improvements  installed,  and  is 
drawing  big  houses  nightly — thanks  to  the  efforts  of  the  popular 
manager.  Mr.  E.  Robinson  Brierley.  In  such  good  hands,  the 
inhabitants  of  Tottenham  cannot  fail  to  receive  an  efficient  weekly 
review  of  all  the  best  films  on  the  market. 

Since  the  beginning  of  the  year  the  Cines  Company  have  joined 
forces  with  the  celebrated  Latent  Company-  of  America,  and  as  a 
result  will  soon  be  issuing  a  fortnightly  "big  film''  in  their 
celebrated  series.  These  will  be  produced  speciallv  for  the  English 
market  and  in  most  cases  will  be  the  work  of  English  authors. 
Many  of  the  films  will  strain  to  the  full,  the  resources  of  the  Cines 
stock  company,  who  employ  over  two  hundred  actors  in  their 
productions. 

What  was  thought  to  be  a  simple  gas  or  cinema  explosion  at  a 
Liege  music  hall,  known  as  the  Wintergarten.  subsequently  proved 
lo  be  the  result  of  a  terrible  criminal  outrage.  An  infernal  machine, 
loaded  with  gunpowder  and  chlorate,  and  containing  nails  and  other 
iron  projectiles,  had  been  placed  under  a  bench  during  the  dark- 
ness necessitated  by  the  cinema  show  It  partially  destroyed  the 
music  hall  and  injured  forty-seven  persons,  including  some  women. 
mostly  belonging  to  the  working  class 

The  Gaumont  Film  Hire  Service  announce  that  they  will  shortly 
enlarge  their  premises  by  adding  another  j.ooo  sq.  feet  of  floor 
space   to    the   alreadv  extensive  department.     One  of  the  principal 


schemes  which  thev  will  carrv  out,  is  to  form  a  sort  ol  review  club 
for  the  benefit  of  customers' wishing  not  only  to  book  their  own 
programmes,  but  to  see  the  films  before  doing  so.  They  intend 
building  a  comfortable  projecting  room,  and  each  Friday  from 
10.30  a.m.  to  b.30  p.m..  various  makes  of  films  will  be  shown  from 
four  to  six  weeks  before  the  release  dates. 

Grimsby  Town  Council  have  decided  a  rather  curious  point  in 
cinema  legislation.  Two  applications  by  different  applicants  were 
submitted  for  the  license  ol  the  Strand  Picture  Palace.  One  on 
behalf  of  the  owner  of  the  building,  the  other  on  behalf  of  the 
lessee.  There  was  no  objection  raised  by  the  owner  to  the  granting 
of  a  license  to  the  lessee  He  wished,  however,  to  secure  himsell 
against  depreciation  of  the  value  of  the  theatre,  which  would  take 
place  if  no  license  existed,  and  the  lessees  withdrew  their  pro- 
duction. The  Council  eventually  granted  the  license  to  the  lessee 
on  the  ground  that  he  was  the  actual  responsible  manager.  The 
other  application  was  dismissed. 

One  of  the  most  charming  booklets  we  have  recently  seen  is  the 
■•  Souvenir  of  English  Picture  Players,"  which  the  Hepworth 
Manufacturing  Co..  Ltd.,  is  sending  out  to  its  customers.  Taste- 
fully bound  in  portfolio  cover,  and  tied  with  silk  ribbon,  are  a 
number  of  leading  members  of  the  Hepworth  stock  company. 
Produced  direct  from  the  negative  in  best  photographic  style,  these 
pictures  will  appeal  to  all  who  appreciate  an  artistic  production. 
Each  portrait  is  accompanied  by  brief  biographical  details.  The 
souvenir  is  so  tastefullv  produced  that  it  is  worthy  of  permanent 
preservation,  and  readers  who  have  not  already  obtained  a  copy 
should  write  to  the  Company  without  delay  and  secure  one,  as  the 
demand  is  immense. 

The  International  Motion  Picture  School  and  Agency,  81— 3, 
Shaftesbury  Avenue,  W,  is  an  institution  for  the  training  of  play- 
wrights in  the  art  of  writing  plays  and  scenarios  for  the  production 
of  motion  pictures.  There  is  alwavs  a  difficulty  in  obtaining  a 
supplv  of  satisfactory  plots  for  this  purpose,  and  as  the  rate  of 
remuneration  is  attractive  those  who  have  a  natural  bent  111  this 
direction  should  communicate  with  the  Secretary  of  the  School, 
and  ask  for  details  of  their  course  of  training  by  post.  1  he  tee  is 
most  moderate.  The  founder  of  the  School,  Mr.  Richard  Green. 
has  had  considerable  experience  in  the  writing  of  picture  play  plots. 

\  new  camera  for  photographing  the  aurora  boreahs  ar.d  other 
northern  light  phenomena  has  just  been  made  for  Professor  Stormer. 
of  the  Umversit)  of  Christiania,  Norway.  It  will  be  used  to 
measure  the  relative  brightness  of  the  aurora  at  different  periods, 
and  to  enable  a  cinematograph  reproduction  ot  it  to  be  made  after- 
wards. The  photographs  will  be  taken  at  night  and  will  require  a 
considerable  time  for  exposure-from  two  and  a  halt  to  eight 
minutes  each.  Professor  Stormer,  however,  intends  to  take  a 
series  of  pictures  when  the  aurora  is  v  isible.  These  pictures  will 
then  be  passed  rapidly  through  a  cinematograph  apparatus  when 
a  record  of  the  various  stages  ol  the  phenomenon  will  be  thrown 
upon  the  screen. 


LC.C.  PATTERN. 


SLIDING   STENCTE  CUT  FRONT. 


For  any  llluminant. 
Opal  or   Red    Glass. 

1  \^  shown). 

Emergency  Exit      11  = 
Exit  .10 

Without  fancy  work. 

Emergency  Exit      10 
Exit    -     -  «l 

An\  other  signs  quoted  for. 
Discount    for    quantities. 


MANSELL,  Ltd.,  13a,  Cecil  Court, 


I'll  "a,-  8982  Cit\ . 


W.C. 


Scenarios  for  Cinematograph  Pictures. 

fhis  is  a  m  w  field  open  to  all  people  who  ran  write  up  simple 
ideas  for  Motion  Picture  Plays,  Interesting  and  lucratw 
,„  ,  upation.  Anyone  can  write  Hun,.  No  literary  ability  needed 
Unlimited  demand.    Good  pay. 

It  you  wish  t,.  increase  \>>ur  income,  let  us  teach  you  to  write 
Scenarios.  We  ran  do  so  b)  correspondence.  Send  stamp 
addressed  envelope  for  particulars 

Plot=writers. 

Wehav,    - al  facilities  fot  placing  Plots  and  Scenarios  with 

the  film  producers  Let  us  place  yours,  Our  terms  are:  Reading 
i.,  i  ;  10  per  cent,  commission  when  plot  is  sold.  For  further 
particulars,  stamped  envelope  t,. 

International  Motion  Picture  School  &  Agency 

81-83,  SHAFTESBURY  AVENUE,  E0ND0N,  W. 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,   1912. 


Popular  .  .  . 

P-pv  AJND  rifc-lK 

ICTURE  r  ALACES      managers. 


AND    THEIR 


lllllllll 


I 


No.  1  -MARBLE    ARCH     ELECTRIC    PALACE    Mr.   SEYMOUR    HODGES. 


F  it  happens,  you'll  see  it  here,"  is  one  of  those  catchy 
phrases  which  impresses  itself  more  or  less  permanently 
upon  the  mind. 

There  is  money  in   a   catch   phrase,  but — and  the  "but" 
might   almost   be   spelt  with  two  t*s,  for  it  is  big  enough  to 
drown  many  a  modern  prince,  and  with  greater  ease  than  the  butt 
of  Malmsey  wine  sealed  the  fate  of  the  Royal  stripling. 

As  it  happens,  however,  those  responsible  for  running  the 
Marble  Arch  Electric  Palace,  have  taken  their  measuie  of  the 
"but"  in  this  case,  and  use  the  phrase  with  intention 

The   very  Latest. 

Dwellers  in  Park  Lane  and  tfte  Portman  Square  district,  and 
those  whose  business  takes  them  West  in  the  direction  of  Oxford 
Street,  know  the  value  of  the  catch  phrase 
adopted  as  its  own  by  the  Marble  Arch 
Picture  House — "  If  it  happens  you'll  see  it 
here."  Having  once  visited  it.  they  become 
regular  patrons.  Everything  from  the 
latest  and  best  topical  films,  to  the  most 
humorous  picture  story  without  words,  is 
to  be  seen  at  this  delightful  rendezvous 
of  lashion.  Select  is  the  word  that  best 
describes  it.  A  select  programme,  care- 
lully  selected  to  satisfy  the  most  select  of 
audiences. 

A    Note   of   Refinement. 

A  note  of  tasteful  refinement  is  struck  as 
one  enters  its  doors  A  spacious  and 
prettily  furnished  lounge  leads  to  the 
Theatre.  Scattere-1  about  promiscuously 
are  a  number  of  tiny  tables  at  which  after- 
noun  tea  is  served  in  dainty  style  to  those 
visitors  who  desire  it.  The  artistic  drapery 
has  been  arranged  with  a  careful  eve  to 
effect,  and  the  effect  let  it  be  said  at  once  is 
most  pleasing  in  its  aesihetic  appeal. 

A    Comfortable   Theatre. 

It  is  mi  uncommon  sight  on  a  busv 
afternoon  at  this  time  of  the  year,  to  see 
the  lounge  filled  with  merry  little  family 
parties — father,  mother  and  children  surrounding  the  tiny  tea 
tables,  subsequent  to  spending  a  pleasant  hour,  or  hour  an  i-a- 
half.  in  complete  enjoyment  of  the  picture  programme.  The 
theatre  itself  is  one  of  the  most  comfortable  and  luxurious  in 
London,  aud  from  an  artistic  point  of  view  would  be  difficult  to 
beai.  The  scheme  of  colouring  is  rose  du  Barri,  and  the  general 
effect  created  is  most  pleasing.  There  is  seating  accommodation 
for  580  persons,  and  the  prices  of  admission  range  from  half-a- 
crown  to  sixpence.  A  box  may  be  had  for  half-a-guinea,  and  even 
at  these  prices  the  theatre  is  nearly  always  full.  It  is  interesting 
in  note  by  the  way.  that  the  proprietors  of  the  Marble  Arch  Picture 
Palace  were  the  first  to  start  these  prices,  and  it  is  very  evident 
that  they  find  this  policy  pays,  for  the  audience  attracted  is  one  of 
the  most  fashionable  in  London.  The  play  picture's  the  thing — to 
paraphrase  a  well-known  quotation— and  one  can  always  rely  upon 


MARBLE    ARCH     El.ECTKIC    PALACE. 


the   programme   at   the   Marble  \rch  house  being  of  the   very  best 
and  absolutely  up-to-date. 

A    Fine   Orchestra. 

The  performances  are  continuous,  from  2  o'clock  to  10-45  P-m- 
which  gives  an  average  of  seven  shows  a  day.  though  these 
vary  according  to  the  number  of  topical  films  shown.  One  note- 
worthy feature  is  that  orchestral  music  and  effects,  as  an 
accompaniment  to  the  pictures,  ha\e  been  reduced  to  a  fine  art  by 
the  management  of  Electric  Palaces.  Ltd.  The  orchestra  at  the 
Marble  Arch,  consisting  of  eight  performers — several  of  them 
double-handed,  bv  the  way — is  as  good  as  any  of  its  size  we  have 
heard.  It  includes  a  Mustel  organ,  grand  piano,  first  and  second 
violin,  bass  and  'cello,  and  would  be  a  credit  to  manv  a  full-sized 
theatre. 

Royal    Visitors. 

There  is  such  a  noticeable  "  tone  "  abuut 
the  entire  performance,  that  one  is  not 
surprised  to  see  motor  cars  and  carriages, 
with  their  liveried  servants,  continually  at 
the  door.  It  is  also  interesting  to  know- 
that  on  more  than  one  occasion  recently, 
when  the  Coutt  has  been  in  residence  at 
Buckingham  Palace,  Princess  Mary  and  her 
younger  brothers  have  been  included  in  the 
audience,  and,  let  it  be  said,  the  Royal 
Children  are  always  among  the  most 
appreciative 

A  Manager  of  wide  experience 

Such  a  theatre  requires  a  manager  of 
.  wide  experience,  and  in  Mr.  Seymour 
Hodges,  we  have  an  ideal  man  for  tile 
position.  He  knows  the  bu.-iness  from  A 
to  7 ,  and  during  the  two  years  that  he  has 
helped  to  shape  the  destines  of  the  Marble 
Arch  Theatre  he  has  made  a  host  of  friends. 
For  two  decades  he  has  been  in  the  theatre 
business,  part  of  the  time  as  an  actor,  and 
Mr.  Hodges  could  make  the  boast,  if  he 
were  not  too  modest,  that  he  has  managed 
more  London  theatres  in  his  time  than 
any  other  man.  To  wit,  he  can  say  that  he  has  directed  the  fortunes 
of  the  Lyric,  the  Comedy,  the  Prince  of  Wales,  the  Criterion,  Wynd- 
ham's,  the  Strand,  the  Globe  (the  two  latter  have  since  been  pulled 
down  I,  the  Coronet  and  the  Camden.     A  goodlv  list  my  masters  ! 

Mr.  Hodges  managed  the  Divine  Sarah's  first  season  in  1897-S. 
when  the  late*  King  (then  Prince  of  Wales)  visited  the  theatre  three 
limes  in  one  week.  Apropos  of  Royalty.  Mr.  Hodges  recalled  the 
fact  that  when  "  The  White  Chrysanthemum  "  was  running  at  the 
Criterion,  the  whole  of  the  Royal  Family  was  present  on  the  night 
prior  to  the  departure  of  the  Prince  of  Wales  for  India.  The  party 
included  King  Edward  and  Queen  Alexandra,  the  Prince  aid 
Princess  ot  Wales  (now  our  King  and  Queen),  the  Duke  and 
Duchess  of  Connaught  and  others. 

Of  Marble  Arch  it  may  be  said  that  it  is  an  exceptional  theatre. 
and  of  Mr.  Seymour  Hodges  that  he  is  an  exceptional  manager. 


February,    1912. 


THE1  CINEMA. 


THE    CINEMA-CRECHE. 


A     BUSINESS    SUGGESTION    FOR    THE    SALE    SEASON. 


LONG  ago  it  occured  to  some  w>se  drapers  and  big  shop- 
keepers that  the  best  time  for  their  sales  was  the  holiday 
season,  when  the  children  are  home  from  school. 
The  result  of  this  scheme  on  the  part  of  the  wily 
outfitter  is  that  mother,  surrounded  by  her  offspring 
(  ornes  up  to  Town  by  an  early  train,  her  soul  fired  with  the  hope 
of  marvellous  bargains  (like  those  figured  in  the  catalogue).  She 
plunges  with  her  attendant  train  of  children  into  the  whirlpool  ol 
ih"  bargain  counters,  and  all  goes  well  for  a  time. 

|ohn  Willie  ami  Henry  Alexander  are  provide!  with  new  school 
suits.  Ethel  is  fitted  with  a  marvellously  cheap  ami  suitable  party 
truck  that  will  bring  tears  of  envy  to  the  eyes  of  her  dearest  girl 
friends,  and  mother  herself  is  just  trying  on  a  hat  when  George 
Albert,  aged  five,  begins  to  sob. 

A  flood   of  Tears. 

Poor  mother  tries  to  console  the  little  fellow,  but  he  is  difficult 
to  reassure.  He  is  tired  and  his  legs  ache.  The  poor  woman  is 
herself  fatigued  and  irritated  and  wishes  she  had  been  able  to  leave 
him  at  home.  She  wonders  vaguely  if  it  really  would  have  been 
safe  to  leave  him  in  charge  of  the  little  servant,  but  feels  in  her 
heart  that  he  would  certainly  have  set  fire  to  himself  playing  with 
matches  or  have  met  with  some  other  disaster.  The  sudden  flood 
of  tears  embarrases  her  in  front  of  the  other  bargain  hunters,  and 
she  wishes  she  had  some  safe  place  to  leave  the  children  where 
they  could  be  amused  and  kept  out  of  harm's  way. 

The   Cinema   Managers   Chance. 

This  is  the  chance  for  the  enterprising  Cinema  Manager  whose 
hall  is  situated  in  a  shopping  district. 

Why  not  include  in  the  programme  a  special  series  of  films  for 
the  children,  say  from.io  in  the  morning  to  4-30  in  the  afternoon  ? 
A  scheme   could   easilv   be   worked  out  that  would  prove  a  boon  to 


parents  and  would  undoubtedly  receive  the  enthusiastic  support  ol 
the  children.  They  could  be  handed  over  to  the  care  of  a  suitable 
matron,  and  the  mother  could  receive  a  ticket  for  them  exactly  as 
if  thev  were  parcels  in  a  cloak  room.  A  day's  shopping  would 
prove  as  important  in  the  children's  exes  as  a  partv — if  it  included 
a  visit  to  the  Cinema-creche. 

Good   for   the   Kiddies. 

There  are  of  course  objections  that  would  be  advanced.  Someone 
is  sure  to  suggest  that  it  is  a  scheme  for  the  propagation  of  measles 
or  colds,  but  a  little  thought  will  show  that  it  is  a  good  deal 
healthier  for  the  kiddies  than  being  dragged  through  crowds  in 
over-heated  bazaars  or  from  shop  to  shopinnastv  weather.  Social 
distinctions  also  might  enter  into  consideration,  but  these  could  be 
evaded  by  a  sliding  scale  of  prices  for  the  seats,  and  a  guarantee 
on  the  part  of  the  management  that  the  sixpenny  children  should 
not  mix  with  the  aristocratic  babes  at  eighteen-pence. 

A    Splendid    Advertisement. 

Altogether  it  is  a  scheme  that  is  capable  of  development,  it 
might  even  run  to  season  tickets  !  and  would  certainly  attract 
more  attention  from  the  public  than  many  more  expensive 
advertising  schemes.  The  tickets  should  be  good  for  the  day  in 
order  to  give  the  mother  the  opportunity  of  taking  one  or  other  of 
the  children  out  to  buy  something,  bringing  it  back  parcel  laden, 
and  then  going  off  on  an  expedition  by  herself,  returning  for  lunch 
and  say,  leaving  all  the  children  in  the  Cinema-creche  for  a  short 
time  during  the  afternoon. 

The  idea  is  new,  but  once  started  would  bring  the  management 
of  the  first  hall  to  adopt  it  the  gratitude  of  thousands  of  weary 
shoppers,  and  serve  to  fill  the  empty  hours  and  swell  the  box 
office  receipts. — H.P. 


F.  FARRELL  &  Co.,  Ltd., 


CINEMATOGRAPH    THEATRE    BUILDERS. 


STRUCTURAL    ALTERATIONS    AND    REDECORATION 

SCHEMES    CARRIED     OUT    WITHOUT     INTERFERING 

WITH    DAILY    PERFORMANCES. 


We  make  it  our  business    to    know    all    the 
new    regulations    issued    by  the  Authorities. 


Estimates  Free — 

Town,  Country  or  Abroad. 


CORRESPONDENCE     ES     TOUTES     LAXGUES. 


Telegraphic  Address: 
Farrellize,   London. 

'Phone : 
7018   P.O.   Hamp»te»d. 


9,  Fleet  Road, 
Hampstead,  n.w. 


SPECIAL    TERMS    TO    RELIABLE    FIRMS. 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


MOVING    PICTURES: 

HOW    THEY    ARE    MADE    AND    WORKED. 


Mr.  Frederick  A.   Talbot's  book  "Moving  Pictures,'    which  is  reviewed  at  length  on  this  and    the  subsequent  page,  is    one 

of  the  most  interesting  contributions  to  Cinematograph  literature. 


TO  say  that  the  picture  theatre  has  become  an  almost 
necessary  part  ot  our  daily  life  during  the  last  few  years, 
is  to  express  the  merest  platitude.  It  is  everywhere, 
and  its  ambassadors  busy  plying  the  handle  of  their 
cameras  are  a  familiar  sight  at  all  important  functions. 
But  few  of  the  public  who  pay  their  money  to  see  the  world 
and  all  its  wonders  as  they  sit  in  comfort  in  a  velvet  cushioned 
armchair,  ever  realise  the  wealth  of  romance  that  lies  behind  the 
making  of  many  of  the  pictures  they  see. 
I  he  cinematograph  industry  has  had  a 
comparatively  short  life,  and  its  progress 
has  been  so  rapid  that  it  has  practically 
been  making  history  all  the  time. 

Even  to-day  little  more  than  the  first 
chapter  is  complete.  Improvements  have 
succeeded  improvements  with  such  rapidity 
that  there  has  hardly  been  time  to  keep 
pace  with  the  progress  made,  let  alore 
record  it  in  more  than  ephemeral  form. 

Genesis  of  the  Moving  Picture. 

The  appearance  of  Mr.  Frederick  A. 
Talbot's  "  Moving  Pictures  :  How  they  are 
Made  and  Worked  "  (William  Heinemann, 
6s.).  is  therefore  very  welcome.  This  hand- 
some volume  in  the  course  of  some  jjo  odd 
pages  tells  in  most  comprehensive  and 
entertaining  manner  the  history  of  the 
moving  picture  from  its  earliest  days,  right 
down  to  the  present  time.  Mr.  Talbot  does 
not  pretend  that  his  book  is  a  practical 
manual.  It  would  defeat  its  own  object  if 
it  were,  but  although  devoid  of  intricate 
technicalities,  it  makes  fascinating  reading 
even  for  the  practical  man,  and  the  various 
mechanical  aspects  of  cinematography  are 
treated  so  clearly  that  the  book  should 
appeal  to  many  already  engaged  in  the 
business  whose  knowledge  of  it  is  by  no 
means  as  complete  as  it  should  be. 

Mr.  Talbot  devotes  no  little  space  to  a 
studv  of  the  question  :  what  is  animated 
photography  ?  and  as  we  read  his  always 
interesting  pages  we  are  reminded  ol  the 
toy  in  our  nursery  days  "  The  Wheel  ol 
Life,"  which  when  spun  round,  and  one 
looked  through  the  peephole,  reproduced  a 
small  army  of  moving  figures.  This  un- 
doubtedly was  the  forerunner  of  what  we 
now  know  as  "  The  Moving  Picture,"  and 
little  did  its  unknown  inventor  dream  that 
the  principle  that  governed  his  simple 
toy,  would  one  day,  in  another  form,  cause 
such  a  stir  in  the  entertainment  world,  as 
the  cinematograph  has  done, 

First   Moving   Picture  Machine. 

Thomas  Aha  Eddison  was  the  man  to 
publicly  exhibit  the  Hist  moving  picture 
machine  at  the  World's  Fair,  I  liicago,  in 
I  but  it  was  an  Englishman,  Mr.  K.  W. 
Paul,  who  first  discovered  how  to  throw  the 
moving  pictures  on  to  a  screen,  and  he  may 
justly  be  called  the  father  of  the  immense 
industry  since  built  up,  though  even  now  in 
its  infancy,  as  those  declare  who  ought  to 
know.  This  invention  lifted  animated  Tin 
photography  from  the  realm  of  experiment  R. 
into  that  of  commercial  practicability. 


THE 


[. 

A   Thrilling   Moment. 

How  success  ultimately  crowned   Mr.  Pauls  efforts  to  invent  the 
necessary  projector,  is  well  told  by  Mr.  Talbot  : 

■'  About  three  o'clock  one  morning  in  the  earl  v  months  of  1895.  the 
quietness  of  Hatton  Garden  was  disturbed  by  loud  and  prolonged 
shouts.  The  police  rushed  hurriedly  to  the  building  from  whence 
the  shouts  proceeded,  and  found  Mr.  Paul 
and  his  colleagues  in  their  workshop,  giving 
vent  to  whole-hearted  exhuberance  of 
triumph.  They  had  just  succeded  in 
throwing  the  first  perfect  animated  pictures 
upon  a  screen.  To  compensate  the  police 
tor  their  fruitless  investigation,  the  film, 
which  was  40  feet  in  length,  and  produced 
a  picture  7  feet  square,  was  run  through  the 
lantern  for  their  special  edification.  They 
regarded  the  strange  spectacle  as  ample 
compensation  and  had  the  satisfaction  ol 
being  the  firct  members  of  the  public  to  see 
mining  pictures  thrown  upon  the  screen." 

First   Picture   Palace. 

The  new  invention  was  shown  at  Olympia 
under  the  management  of  the  late  Sir 
Augustus  Harris,  which  thus  became  the 
first  picture  palace  in  the  world.  Pater  it 
was  introduced  as  a  nine  day's  wondei  I  !  ) 
into  the  programme  at  the  London  Alhambra, 
where  an  astonished  audience  was  able  to 
witness  the  Derbv  of  iScjG,  the  night  after  it 
was  run.  Particular  interest  attaches  to 
this — the  first  topical  film— and  we  are 
enabled  to  reproduce  it  in  these  pages  by 
courtesy  of  the  publisher  of  Mr.  Talbot's 
book. 

It  is  interesting  to  know  that  the  lapse  ol 
time  has  not  effected  any  essential  change  in 
the  construction  of  the  apparatus.  The 
camera  and  projector  as  used  to-day  are 
.  fundamentally  the  same  as  those  l'aui  first 
employed.  The  film  too,  has  undergone 
but  little  change.  The  width  remains  the 
same  ;  the  dimensions  of  the  picture  are 
identical:  and  the  perforation  guage  has 
never  been  revised  with  reference  to  the 
number  of  holes  per  picture. 

The  success  ol  the  twentieth  century 
picture  palace  is  dependent  to  a  very  great 
extent  upon  electricity.  Improvement  is 
probably  responsible  for  the  fact  that  taken 
on  the  whole,  as  Mr.  Talbot  declares,  the 
British  picture  theatre  is  the  best  in  the 
world  from  every  point  ol  view. 


Topical    E'ilms. 

In  one  respect  at  least,  the  British 
manufacturer  gives  a  lead  to  his  competitors. 
A  great  feature  is  made  in  most  picture 
theatres  of  the  topical  film.  In  this  field 
England  is  paramount-  Americans  have 
not  the  same  faith  in  their  drawing  powers, 
he,llce,  less  trouble  and  energy  is  expended 
upon  them. 


PICAL    FILM. 


rb)   oj   1896,  ciiumatographed  by  Mr. 
Fit ul,   and   shown   next   day   at   tin 

London  Allncnbia. 


February,  1912.  THE    CINEMA. 


The  only  Singing  Pictures 

which    give    perfect    satisfaction    are    those    shown    on 

THE  VIVAPHONE. 

They    dispel    the 

MONOTONY 

which    is    the 

BANE 

of 

THE    CONTINUOUS    PERFORMANCE. 

Install    it,    and   you   will   be   amazed   at    the    IMPROVEMENT   in    both    your 

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THE    BOX    OFFICE     RECEIPTS. 


Price   £5   5s.,    fitted   to   any   Projector. 

Absolutely   Correct  Synchronisation. 

Perfect   Quality   Pictures. 

ONLY    EASTMAN    STOCK    USED. 

Write   for  List  and   Full  Information    TO=DAY. 


The  Hcpworth  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ld., 

Cinematographers, 

2,    Dcnman   Street,    Piccadilly  Circus,    London,   W. 

Telegrams-  "  Heptoic,   London."  Telephone — 2451  Gerrard. 


10 


THE    CI'NEMA. 


FebruarV,  1912. 


Topical  work  is  set  with  considerable  danger  at  times.  Thus  : 
••  The  Messina  Earthquake  was  a  striking  case  in  point.  The  first 
authoritative  news  precipitated  a  small  army  of  operators  to  the 
spot.  Scarcely  had  the  earth  ceased  its  mighty  devastating  quivers 
when  the  cinematographer  was  among  the  tottering  ruins  securing 
records  of  the  disaster.  Now  and  again  there  was  a  rush  for  a 
point  of  safety  to  escape  a  collapsing  wall.  Sometimes  the  flight 
was  so  hurried  that  the  operator  had  to  abandon  his  camera  and 
saw  it  buried  beneath  thousands  of  tons  of  debris.  Occasionally 
the  operator  himself  was  too  slow,  and  was  himself  overwhelmed 
while  pursuing  his  dangerous  work." 

Immense  Productions. 

Even  those  of  us  in  close  touch  with  the  trade  hardly  realise  the 
immensity  of  some  of  the  productions,  so  much  are  they  matters  of 
every-day  occurrence.  The  first  really  big  cinema  film  was 
"The  Passion  Play,"  produced  in  New  York  in  1897.  Several 
weeks  were  devoted  to  the  preparation  of  this  film,  and  no  less 
than  ^3,200  was  spent  upon  it.  It  runs  to  three  reels,  or  about 
3,000  feet,  and  some  48,000  separate  pictures.  To-day  the  business 
has  attained  such  a  pitch  ot  perfection  that  in  the  recent  "  Siege  of 
Calais  "  photo-play,  2,500  men  and  horses  took  part,  and  the  Selig 
Polyscope  Co.'s  three  reel  masterpiece,  "  Christopher  Columbus," 
(to  be  released  on  April  7th),  took  three  years  to  produce,  and  has 
had  over  /6,ooo  spent  upon  it. 

The  Demand  for  Realism. 

In  the  United  States  demand  for  realistic  films  has  developed 
into  almost  a  mania. 

"The  American  Biograph  Co.  had  arranged  to  produce  a  film 
version  of  the  famous  Indian  novel  "  Kamona,"  in  which  the  great 
scene  is  the  devastation  of  the  white  settlement  by  Indians.  In 
order  that  the  sacking  and  destruction  of  homes  might  be  correct, 
to  a  detail,  a  small  village  was  purchased  and  fired.  In  another 
instance  the  same  Company  wished  to  produce  a  fire  scene.  They 
built  a  house  of  the  style  they  desired,  then  set  it  on  fire  and  burnt 
it  to  the  ground.     But  the  Selig  Company  eclipsed  this  performance 


One  day  a  fire  broke  out  in  a  big  department  store  in  Los  Angeles. 
It  was  a  unique  opportunity  to  obtain  a  powerful  play,  so  the 
producers  after  securing  over  the  telephone  the  consent  of  the  fire 
brigade  authorities,  hurried  principals  and  operators  to  the  con- 
flagration. The  players  ran  great  risks,  but  the  film  producer  was 
satisfied." 

The  Picture  Player. 

The  film-play  offers  immense  scope  to  the  actor  and  actress,  and 
many  manufacturers  maintain  their  own  stock  companies.  But  the 
selection  of  players  is  by  no  means  easy. 

"  The  cinematographic  stage  has  its  own  particular  requirements. 
The  pre-eminent  one  is  that  the  actor  must  not  only  act,  but  look 
the  part.  A  young  man  cannot  make  up  to  take  an  old  man's  part — 
he  must  be  an  old  man.  A  woman  of  middle  age  may  on  the 
legitimate  stage  excel  in  a  young  woman's  role,  but  she  may  not 
take  it  on  the  camera  stage.  Make-up  has  been  reduced  to  a 
minimum." 

III. 

The  Future  of  the  Cinema  Theatre. 

In  this  country  the  growth  of  the  cinematograph  theatre  has 
been  phenomenal  during  the  last  few  years,  and  to-day  there  is 
scarcely  a  town  of  any  size  or  importance  which  does  not  boast  at 
least  one  picture  theatre  or  hall      What  of  the  future? 

Mr.  Talbot  is  in  entire  agreement  with  those  in  close  touch  with 
the  business  that  the  cinematograph  is  still  in  its  infancy.  Not 
only  will  it  maintain  its  hold  as  a  means  of  popular  entertainment. 
It  will  eventually  displace  all  other  methods  in  the  schoolroom  for 
teaching  geography,  among  many  other  subjects.  And  once  an 
energetic  Board  of  Education  realises  the  possibilities  of  cinemato- 
graphy as  a  supplement  to  the  information  conveyed  by  textbooks 
and  manuals,  the  film  manufacturers  will  hasten  to  fill  the  demand 
thus  created. 

Mr.  Talbot  is  entitled  to  our  thanks  for  producing  a  most 
readable  book,  which  has  been  turned  out  in  irreproachable  style 
by  Messrs.  Heinemann,  and  illustrated  with  a  lavishness  which 
adds  considerably  to  its  value  and  entertainment. — L.W. 


The  Oliver  Typewriter- 
arrests  attention. 


"  lPCOVefc  b\>  fl>iCtUie$"  is  a  graphic  and  interesting  book- 
let. It  makes  its  points  by  the  pictures — reading  matter 
being  reduced  to  a  minimum.  The  most  casual  glance  at 
it  shows  that  the 

OLIVER  Typewriter 

differs  widely  from  other  typewriters,  especially  in  the 
matter  of  its  typebars.  It  is  mainly  on  account  of  this 
difference  that  the  Oliver  has  earned  the  reputation  of 
being  the  most  powerful  manifolder  and  the  most  durable 
of  writing  machines.  For  wiiting  stensils  for  the  Duplicator 
it  is  admittedly  unequalled.  These  are  definite  claims 
which  we  ask  you  to  note  against  the  time  that  you  buy 
a  typewriter.  Why  not  write  for  the  booklet?  Its  reference 
No.  is  834. 

(Over  400,000  sold). 


OLIVER    TYPEWRITER    Co.,    Ltd., 
75,    Queen    Victoria    Street,    London,   E.C. 

CONTRACTORS    TO    H.M.    GOVERNMENT. 


February,    L912. 


the  Cinema. 


n 


"  What  e'er  men  do.  or  say,  or  think,  or  dream, 
Our  motley  paper  seizes  for  its  theme."  — Steele. 


AX   old  jnan   was   recently   to   he  seen   leading   a 
very   tired    but   healthy-looking   donkey   along 
Piccadilly     Circus.       On    its    back    were    two 
boards    about    three   feet  square,  bearing  this 
conspicuous  sign,  "  I   am   the  only  one  who  is  not  going 

to  the —       —Theatre  this  Xmas  to   see  the  great 

Pantomime.     Of  course,  I'm  an  ass!" 

A  teacher  was  describing  the  Passage  of  the  Red  Sea. 
The  children  followed  his  words  intently  ;  and  his  perora- 
tion was  accompanied  by  a  piping  voice  exclaiming  : 

"  Yes,  teacher,  I  know  that's  right  !" 

"  Why  ?"  asked  the  somewhat  startled  teacher. 

"  Because  I  saw  it  !  " 

The  child  subsequently  explained  that  she  had  been 
to  a  picture  theatre  the  previous  evening,  and  had  seen 
the  Israelites  crossing  the  Red  Sea. 

Our  American  correspondent  writes  us  that  an  in- 
teresting story  is  going  round,  apropos  of  the  recent 
blizzards.  It  appears  that  a  showman  in  North  Dakota 
set  to  work  and  built  a  palace  of  blocks  of  frozen  snow, 
and  succeeded  in  giving  successful  displays  upon  a 
screen  of  ice  brought  in  from  a  neighbouring  lake. — 
M'yts  ! 


Brighton  Town  Council  has  banned  Sunday  picture 
shows. 

St" 

Banned  evidently  means  Municipal  orchestial  concerts 
on  Sunday  at  London  by-the-Sea.  A  band  of  another 
kind! 


What   the 
or  something  to 


The)   evidently  swear  by  the  old  saying: 
eye  does'nt   see,  gathers  no  moss  "- 
that  effect. 

It  was  at  a  Sunday  afternoon  lecture,  between  pictures, 
and  the  speaker  was  about  to  propose  a  vote  of  thanks 

"  Er — er — what  shall  I — er — say  ?"  he  began. 

A  tiny  voice  piped  out:  "  Sit  down  and  say  Amen  !  " 

He  did  as  he  was  bid  without  delay. 

"«* 

A  splendid  one-Knight  show — "  Henry  VIII."     Tree- 
mendous.     What  a  pity  it  cannot  be  revived. 


"  'Christopher  Columbus,'  what  a  him  !  " 
Who   made   the   remark,   and    when  ?      On   and   after 
April  7th  we  shall  hear  that  pretty  frequently.     Ask  the 
Selig  people.     It  cost  them  £6,000  to  discover  America, 
and  three  years  to  record  the  fact. 


"  Twinkle,  twinkle, 
tion  to  the  moving 
Tclegvam. 


little  star,"  has  a  special  applica- 
picture     actorine."  —  Youngstoirn 


The  Durbar  pictures  on  the  rlickergraphs  are  giving 
us  new  stories.  At  one  show,  a  view  of  a  Bombay 
street  exhibited  some  curious  looking  carts  driven  by 
well-fed  natives  in  high  turbans.  "Which  one's  the 
Durbar  ?  "  asked  a  boy  ;  and  his  fond  parent  replied, 
"  Don't  bother,  but  look  at  the  pictures.  The  Durbar's 
a  place  of  course." — London  Opinion. 


Sweetheart  and  Wife. — Pearl  Fishing  ! 


Such  things  have  happened  before. 


As  a  matter  of  fact  these  two  lines  are  the  titles  ot 
films  recently  shown  at  a  provincial  hall.  They  occupied 
contiguous  positions  on  the  day-bill  shown  outside,  and 
caused  no  little  speculation  among  the  audience.  Some 
one  says  the  bachelors  were  disappointed. 

A  few  weeks  ago,  a  certain  astute  customer  of  ours 
attended  a  sale  of  obsolete  aeroplanes  without  motors.  He 
was  fortunate  enough  to  have  one  of  them  "  knocked  down  ' 
to  him  at  an  exceedingly  low  figure.  He  thereupon  immedi- 
atelybooked  from  us  the  film  entitled  "Aerial  Anarchists." 
A  few  days  before  its  exhibition  he  sent  three  men 
round  the  town  in  aviator's  costume,  one  seated  in  the 
machine,  which  he  had  rigged  up  with  a  dummy  motor 
and  propellor,  and  had,  of  course,  suitable  printing 
matter  inscribed  on  the  planes  and  wings.  Needless  to 
say,  this  clever  idea  caused  a  great  sensation  in  the  town, 
and  even  beat  the  weather  and  the  Insurance  Bill  as  a 
topic  of  conversation.  Result,  of  course,  packed  houses 
for  a  week. — Our  News. 

THE     WAG. 


12 


THE     CINEMA. 


February,  1912. 


Kexwnt  Co&r&mtxka .m. 

fycad  European  Office:  S  -Ticvt  Compter)  5f*  London-WC- 
♦  "ttJaDagingDirarctor:  J*Fr<»nkBrockIi$$  *  . 


OTION 


NEW 


^ 


f    REX    FILMS  are  unsurpassed  for  plot,  acting,  and  scenic  beauty. 


% 


Feb. 

17th. 

SCENES    ROUND    DENVER. 

Travel. 

220-ft 

Feb. 

24th. 

A   BREACH   OF   FAITH. 

Drama. 

1070-ft 

Mar. 

2nd. 

ON   THE   BRINK. 

Drama. 

900-ft 

Mar. 

2nd. 

PICTURESQUE  COLORADO. 

Travel. 

380-ft 

Mar. 

9th. 

THE   RETURN. 

Drama. 

1045-ft 

Mar. 

16th. 

THE   TALE   OF   A   CAT. 

Comedy. 

995-ft 

ALL    REX    FILMS   are   printed   on    Eastman    Stock. 


Wires  : 
k^  "  Rexmopic,  London. 


SEND    FOR 
SPECIAL    DESCRIPTIONS. 


'Phone ; 
1262  GERRARD. 


j6 


American  $  Continental  film  Co. 

FILM     d'ART. 

Feb.  21st.    THE  QUEEN'S  JEWEL  Drama.     1070=ft. 

Mar.  9th.    THE  RED  INN.  Drama.     I445=ft. 


MONO. 

Feb.  28th.     BOB'S  NIGHTMARE.  Comic.    550=ft. 

Mar.  2nd.    THE  SANDWICHMAN'S  WIFE.    Comic.    450=ft. 


PHAROS. 

Mar.  6th.   LOVE  LAUGHS  AT  LOCKSMITHS.   Comic.  51(Nft. 


ALL  A.  &  C.  FILMS  are  printed  on  Eastman  Stock. 

5a,  Hew  Compton  Street  West, 

CDarina  Cross  Road,  Condon.  W.C. 


February,    1012. 


THK    CINEMA. 


13 


(From  our  own   Correspondent.) 


NEW    YORK,   January    22nd. 

THE  Westerner  has  been  kicking  about  the  pro- 
ductions of  some  of  the  film  manufacturers   of 
the    East,   and     claims    that    they    have    been 
passing    out     films     under     the     heading     of 
Western  Drama,  that  are  anything  but  Ai. 

The  New  York  Motion  Picture  Co.,  say  they  intend 
giving  us  the  real  thing  in  Western  Drama,  and  inciden- 
tally will  produce  some  good,  stirring,  real  thing-stuff,  as 
they  have  secured  the  use  of  the  Miller  Bros.,  ioi 
Ranch  Wild  West  Show. 

You  will  be  able  to  connect  the  idea  better,  when  I 
tell  you  that  the  ioi  Ranch,  is  a  company  of  genuine 
cow  punchers  and  riders  of  all  nationalities,  operating 
under  the  leadership  of  the  Bros.  Miller,  from  their 
headquarters  Ranch  at  Bliss,  Oklahoma.  This  means 
that  in  the  next  films  of  the  N.Y.M.P.  Co.,  we  shall  get 
the  real  goods  as  far  as  riding  and  costume  are  con- 
cerned, and  probably  some  sensational  special  films  as 
well. 

I  remember  the  visit  of  the  ioi  Ranch  to  the  City  of 
Mexico,  and  the  annoyance  of  the  greasers  when  they 
issued  a  challenge  to  a  lariat  competition,  and  a  little 
gentle  playing  with  the  fighting  bulls  in  the  Mexico  City 
Bull-ring. 

The  Mexicans  like  to  kill  their  beef  a  l'Espanol,  with 
a  matador,  toreadors,  etc.  The  Gringos  offered  to  throw 
a  bull  -with  their  bare  hands  !  Popular  feeling  was  out- 
raged, and  the  offer  being  taken  up  at  once,  all  Mexico 
trotted  off  to  the  Bull-ring  to  see  the  stranger  killed, 
and,  with  typically  Mexican  ideas  of  sport  they  were  so 
angry  that  he  was  not,  that  they  drove  the  Americans 
out  of  the  arena  with  a  fusillade  of  bottles,  and  closed 
the  proceedings  with  a  riot. 


Wow !  Real  live  Westerners  from  a  sensational 
show;  real  live  Indians,  bisons,  the  old  Concord  coach, 
and  the  Bison  Stock  Company,  all  delivering  goods  at 
Bear  Valley,  California.  Well,  Los  Angeles  is  a  bright 
little  burg,  but  this  influx  of  the  wild  and  woolly,  will 
sure  make  them  sit  up  and  take  nourishment. 


The  first  film  from  the  Bison  Company,  Miller  Bros. 
combination,  is  entitled  :  "  War  on  the  Plains."  It  ought 
to  be  worth  watching. 

From  a  South  Western  reservation  comes  the  story, 
that  the  Pima  Indians,  who  have  been  taking  part  in 
many  cinematograph  productions,  have  refused  to  go  on 
unless  they  are  allowed  to  appear  in  films,  in  which  the 
red  man  does  not  always  have  to  be  killed  by  the  hero. 
They  claim  that  it  is  falsification  of  their  racial  history 
and  a  distinct  insult,  when  the  tribal  collection  of  pale- 
face scalps  comes  to  be  considered. 

The  semi-educational  film  is  getting  a  fair  amount  of 
boosting  just  now.  One  of  the  latest  is  Edison's  film,  of 
"  Life  in  the  Army,"  showing  the  examination  of  a 
recruit,  physical  drill,  sports,  target  practice,  etc.,  and 
we  are  evolving  a  special  series  of  "Industry  Films" 
that  come  in  useful  for  booming  different  trade  centres. 

-»» 

Great  Britain  has  been  having  a  monopoly  of  the  big 
stuff,  the  Coronation  and  the  Durbar;  but  don't  forget, 
that  the  eveni  of  the  World's  History  will  be  the 
opening  of  the  Panama  Canal ! 

New  York  has  now  over  a  dozen  picture  palaces 
where  the  film  wordings  are  printed  in  Yiddish,  and  it  is 
being  whispered  round  the  Trade  that  one  well-known 
firm  tried  to  make  a  corner  in  a  special  production  for 
Chinatown,  of  a  special,  classic  Chinese  drama.  The 
bright  lad  sent  over  to  make  enquiries,  discovered  that 
a  Chinese  play  took  seven  days  to  act,  and  that  the 
larger  part  of  it  would  be  unsuitable,  as  far  as  passing 
the  license  board  went.     Nix  on  the  Orient— this  time. 

Hkt 

The  four  hundred  are  beginning  to  find  a  use  for  the 
flickergraph.  A  noted  hunter  (who  shall  be  nameless) 
recentfy  staged  a  big  production,  showing  his  prowess 
among  the  big  game  in  the  Adirondacks.  The  butcher's 
bill  for  the  meat  he  slaughtered 
came  to  over  $5,000  ;  but  he  is 
quite  happy,  for  with  the  films 
he  can  show  his  friends  that  he  is 
not  a  liar— at  least,  not  an 
ordinary  one. 


14 


THE   CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


A   Record  Year. — Good  Business.— -A   Big   Opportunity. —  Value  of   Historical   Pictures. — An    Essential   Fact. — A    Futile 
Argun/cut. — /;/  Other  Lauds. — A  Case  for  Fighting. — An  Outrageous  Demand. — Rapid  Growth. — A  Question  of  Ventilation. 

— General  Powers  Bill. — What  is  Non-Flam  Film  ? 


THE  year  ign  was  one  of  the  most  momentous 
in  the  memory  of  the  present  generation, 
marked  as  it  was  by  a  number  of  events  which 
stirred  the  imagination  and  roused  the  loyalty 
of  countless  millions.  The  Coronation  and  all  its 
attendant  pageantry,  and  the  many  Royal  functions 
which  preceded  and  followed  it,  afforded  an  opportunity 
the  like  of  which  the  Cinema  trade  will  not  again  have 
for  years.  The  year  was  also  noteworthy  for  many 
other  happenings  of  an  unusual  and  dramatic  character, 
such  as  the  Sydney  Street  Siege  and  the  Railway  Strike, 
and  in  the  early  days  of  December  the  Dehli  Durbar 
drew  the  camera  men  in  crowds  to  India.  Such 
happenings  provided  some  remarkably  fine  films,  and 
manufacturers  are  entitled  to  full  credit  for  having  given 
the  entertainment  business  a  most  welcome  fillip. 


A  The  Cinema  theatres  throughout  the  country 

Record  were  thus  able  to  offer  their  patrons  such  a 
Year.  host  of  attractions  that  record  business  was 
done,  and  "  House  Full  "  was  the  usual  cry. 
Even  the  abnormally  hot  summer  did  not  have  any 
very  serious  effect  upon  the  box-office  receipts,  and 
congratulations  all  round  have  been  the  order  of  the  day. 
One  very  noticeable  feature  of  the  year  has  been  the 
advance  made  by  the  British  picture,  which  now 
compares  favourably  with  its  rivals.  But  there  is  still 
room  for  improvement.  The  public  is  beginning  to  tire 
of  a  surfeit  of  cowboy  stories,  no  matter  how  well  they 
are  done. 


A  Big  This     is      the     British     manufacturer's 

Opportunity.  opportunity.  There  are  vast  store- 
houses of  unexploited  literature,  which 
can  be  turned  to  account.  Dickens  is  not  the  only 
author  whose  stories  make  good  films.  Historical 
pictures  always  mean  full  houses.  Scott's  "  Kenil- 
worth  "  is  rich  in  dramatic  incident,  and  a  wealth  of 
picturesque  detail.  Harrison  Ainsworth's  "  Old  St. 
Paul's"  could  be  made  to  yield  a  magnificent  picture 
of  London  in  the  seventeenth  century,  and  the  stirring 
effects  which  could  be  introduced  to  illustrate  the  Fire 
of  London,  would  tax  the  seating  capacity  of  every 
picture  palace,  big  and  small.  There  are  many 
other  novels  which  lend  themselves  equally  well  to  the 
requirements  of  the  film  manufacturer,  if  he  will  only 
look  for  them, 


An  This  is  the  line   which  is  going   to  pay,  for 

Essential  pictures  of  historic  interest,  when  carefully 
Fact.  shown,  to  the  accompaniment  of  a  wealth  of 
detail  such  as  characterises  the  film  of  to- 
day, has  a  distinct  educative  value.  Parents  and  school 
teachers  are  among  the  first  to  recognise  this,  and 
children's  afternoon  performances  will  become  more  and 
more  a  feature  of  the  Cinema  theatre  of  the  future.  In 
this  instance  the  race  is  to  the  swift,  and  the  firms 
which  first  grasp  this  essential  fact,  and  act  upon  it,  will 
be  the  ones  to  benefit  to  the  greatest  extent. 


A  Futile 
Argument. 


An  attempt  to  limit  the  number  of  picture 
theatres  in  this  country  recently  made  in 
one  or  two  directions  has  found  little  favour 
at  the  hands  of  licensing  authorities.  In  certain  towns 
in  the  North  of  England  a  determined  set  is  being  made 
against  any  effort  to  increase  their  number,  and  in  Bury 
we  note  that  a  number  of  entenainment  providers  ranged 
themselves  on  the  side  of  the  protesters.  This  is  most 
unwise,  for  the  man-in-the-street  is  a  fairly  shrewd 
person,  and  inclined  to  draw  the  conclusion  that  such 
opposition  from  competitive  shows  is  not  altogether 
disinterested.  In  this  case  the  local  authority  granted 
the  licence  despite  the  protest  of  the  theatre  proprietors, 
and  certain  Nonconformist  bodies,  whose  arguments 
against  the  granting  of  the  license  were  so  weak  that 
they  had  to  fall  back  upon  the  old  chestnut  that  a  multi- 
plicity of  halls  drew  the  people  away  from  the  Churches 
and  Chapels  on  Sunday.  Could  any  argument  be  more 
futile  ? 


In  other  This  attempt  to  put  an  absurd  limit  upon 
Lands.  the  number  of  picture  palaces  is  foredoomed 
to  failure,  if  only  on  account  of  the  tactics 
adopted  by  certain  of  those  whose  interest  it  is  to  do 
so.  It  is  however  worthy  of  note,  according  to  a  private 
letter  recently  received  from  a  resident  in  the  Malay 
Archipelago,  that  the  picture  palaces  in  that  district  are 
causing  the  coolie  labourer  to  become  dissatisfied  with 
his  lot.  He  has  become  infatuated  with  the  craze,  and 
wants  to  go  to  these  places  of  entertainment  every 
evening,  but  his  wages  will  not  permit  of  this  and  other 
indulgences  as  well,  so  that  there  has  been  in  conse- 
quence an  all-round  demand  for  an  increase  of  wages  in 
order  that  this  difficulty  may  be  overcome, 


February,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


15 


ONES    CO 


•* 


HIGHEST    EXCELLENCE    IN 


FILM      PRODUCTION. 

MAGNIFICENT,    SUMPTUOUS     AND     ACCURATE     HISTORICAL     HIGH    ART 
FILMS,    DRAMAS    OF    INTENSE    INTEREST,    REALLY    HUMOROUS    COMICS, 

PICTURESQUE    TRAVEL    SUBJECTS. 


PERFECT     PHOTOGRAPHY,     PERFECT    ACTING, 
AND    PERFECT    MISE    EN    SCENE. 


Telegrams  : 
ROSSICINES. 


Telephone: 
1291-2  CENTRAL 


18,    CHARING    CROSS    ROAD,    W.C. 


COMPLETE 

THEATRE 

EQUIPMENTS 


THE    MOST    PERFECT 
BIOSCOPE    EXTANT. 


NEW    MODEL. 
ABSOLUTELY     FIREPROOF. 


Pictures   registered  while  the  machine  is 
running    or  stationary. 

Optical    Centre    remaining   constant. 

Light  increased  50  per  cent.     No  Supple- 
mentary rollers  to  break  films. 

mechanism     unequalled    in    workmanship 
or  results. 

%      PERFECT.      *> 


Catalogues  Post  Free. 
'Grams  :"  Biqjector,  London."     'Phone:  Hop   1964. 

R.  R.  BEARD, 

MANUFACTURER     OF 

Scientific  Instruments,  Optical  Canterns, 
Cinematoarapbs,  Jets.  Regulators,  Carriers,  $c. 

10,  TRAFALGAR  ROAD,  OLD  KENT  ROAD, 

LONDON,  S.E. 


16 


THE     CINEMA. 


February,  1912. 


A  Case  Apparently  the  cinema  theatre  is  not  to 

For  Fighting.  be  allowed  to  enjoy  its  well-earned 
popularity  without  a  certain  amount  of 
petty  tyranny  on  the  part  of  interested,  but  ill-advised 
competitors.  In  the  North  of  England,  as  we  have 
already  said,  the  picturedrome  has  come  into  its  own,  and 
threatens  to  run  the  variety  houses  a  very  close  race. 
Retaliatory  measures  are  being  resorted  to  which  are 
anything  but  creditable  to  those  concerned.  In  New- 
castle the  Town  Improvement  Committee,  acting  on 
what  appears  to  be  an  inspired  movement,  have  notified 
the  proprietors  of  picture  halls,  where  variety  turns  are 
introduced,  that  they  will  require  the  erection  of  lire- 
proof  curtains  and  additional  exits.  Should  this  decision 
eventually  '  be  upheld,  it  would  undoubtedly  have  the 
effect  of  closing  many  of  the  smaller  halls,  whilst  it 
would  at  the  same  time  have  the  opposite  effect  intended 
of  making  those  fulfilling  the  requirements  of  the  local 
authority,  much  more  serious  rivals  to  variety  theatres. 
Such  one-sided  legislation  will  never  be  tolerated,  and 
our  advice  to  the  proprietors  couce  ned  is  to  stand 
shoulder  to  shoulder  and  resist  so  outrageous  and  absurd 
a  demand.  A  test  case  would  very  soon  settle  the  matter 
in  their  favour. 


A  Rapid 
Growth. 


The  advent  of  the  cinematograph  has  effected  as  great 
a  revolution  in  the  form  of  public  entertain- 
ment during  the  past  decade  as  the  motor  has 
in  that  of  locomotion.  Those  pioneers  in 
experiment  and  research — some  are  still  with 
us — who  in  the  eighties  obtained  results  which  fore- 
shadowed great  possibilities  in  the  moving  picture, 
probably  in  their  wildest  dreams  never  imagined  that 
within  a  few  years  the  whole  civilised  world,  his  wife, 
and  children,  would  be  flocking  to  witness — not  once  in 
a  way,  but  frequently  and  regularly,  exhibitions  of  this 
description.  So  rapidly  are  these  picture  palaces  spring- 
ing up  all  over  the  country,  says  "  The  Daily  Telegraph," 
that  there  will  soon  be  as  many  of  them  as  there  are  now 
churches  and  chapels.  According  to  a  gentleman  con- 
nected with  the  business,  a  town  with  a  population  of 
8,000  affords  a  profitable  opening  for  a  cinematograph 
theatre,  and  in  large  towns  one  for  every  10,000  inhabi- 
tants is  regarded  as  a  fitting  proportion.  There  are  not 
far  short  of  5,000  of  these  places  of  amusement  in  this 
country  at  the  present  time,  and  of  this  number  about 
500  are  in  London  alone.  Brighton  and  Hove,  with  a 
population  of  about  130,000,  have  something  like  sixteen 
of  these  resorts. 


General  The  New  London  County  Council  Powers 
Powers  Act,  .1912,  affecting  the  warehousing  and 
Bill.  storage  of  cinematograph  film,  the  text  of 
which  is  now  available,  proposes  to  establish 
that  after  January  the  1st,  191 3,  all  premises  used  for 
this  purpose  shall  .be  licensed  annually,  shall  be  subject 
to  inspection,  and  that  samples  of  the  inflammable  matters 
contained  therein  may  be  taken,  on  payment  by  the 
inspecting  officer,  and  analysed  for  their  explosive  and 
inflammable   attributes   by  a  duly  qualified  chemist.     A 


film  store  within  the  meaning  of  the  Act  is  declared  to 
be  ';any  premises  in  the  County  (not  being  premises 
licensed  under  the  Cinematograph  Act,  1909)  in  or  upon 
which  cinematograph  films  are  stored,  repaired,  cleaned, 
offered  for  sale  or  hire,  or  otherwise  dealt  with  for  the 
purposes  of  gain."  The  license  is  to  cost  ^,1  annually, 
and  anybody  contravening  the  Act  will  be  liable  to  a 
penalty  not  exceeding  £  20. 


The  <  )ur  contemporary  "  The  Kinematograph  " 

Non=flam  publishes  a  correspondence  between  the 
Controversy,  editor  and  the  Clerk  of  the  London 
County  Council  on  the  subject  of  the 
Non-flam  Film.  The  gist  of  the  matter  is  contained 
in  the  last  paragraph  of  Mr.  Laurence  Gomme's 
letter,  which  says  —  "I  must  however  point  out 
that  although  the  Council  have  so  far  regarded  as 
non-inflammable  within  the  meaning  of  the  Cinemato- 
graph Act,  1909,  any  films  which  were  not  found  to 
support  flame  readily,  it  may,  in  view  of  the  recent 
decision  of  the  Folkestone  magistrates,  adopt  in  future  a 
policy  in  strict  accordance  with  that  decision."  In  view 
of  the  large  use  of  non-flam  films,  the  threatened 
adoption  by  the  L.C.C.  of  the  tactics  of  a  provincial 
bench  is  a  warning  that  cannot  be  disregarded  and  the 
need  is  clearly  shown  for  a  strong  and  impartial  organis- 
ation run  on  business  lines  with  the  object  of  protecting 
the  interests  of  the  Trade,  whenever  threatened  by 
predatory  legislation. 

A  Question         They  are  paying  a  lot  of  attention  just 
of  now     to    the    question    of    ventilation    in 

Ventilation.  cinema  theatres  in  America.  According 
to  a  Chicago  contemporary,  the  City 
Bacteriologist,  Mr.  Frederick  M.  Meader,  of  Syracuse, 
N.  Y.,  is  preparing  some  glass  slides,  culture  media  and 
magnifying  glasses,  to  be  placed  in  several  of  the  local 
theatres  and  moving  picture  houses,  the  slides  having 
been  so  treated  as  to  receive  the  impression  of  the 
atmosphere.  When  developed  in  the  proper  media  these 
slides  will  show  the  number  of  bacteriological  colonies 
in  a  cubic  centimeter  of  the  air  breathed  by  the  theatre 
goers.  Whether  they  are  many  or  few,  the  slides  will 
tell  the  story,  and  both  Dr.  Meader  and  the  Commissioner 
of  Public  safety  are  anxious  that  the  facts  should  be 
made  public  upon  the  completion  of  the  investigation. 


Messrs.  Harris  &  Gillow,  the  cinematograph  property 
experts    have  succeeded    in  reducing  the  assessment  for 
the  Grand   Cinemaj   Ltd.,   on  Terry's  Theatre,  Strand. 
No  doubt  there  are 
many     people     too 
highly  assessed,  and 
as  this  point  is  often 
overlooked,  it  is  well 
worth  while  looking 
into  the  matter.  \-S     t\^^V    ^A^-^^A 


February,   10V2. 


THE    CINEMA. 


17 


Mr.    HARRY     ROYSTON. 


Miss    CHRISSIE     WHITE. 


Miss     GLADYS     SYLVANI. 


Mr.     HAY     PLUMB. 


The   People's  Popular   Players. 

No.  1.— MEMBERS    OF    THE    HEPWORTH     STOCK    COMPANY. 


18 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,   1912. 


MEN    OF    THE    MOMENT 

IN    THE    CINEMATOGRAPH     WORLD. 

No.  1.— Mr.  Horace  Sedger,  of  Electric  Palaces,  Ltd. 


A  n  interview  with  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Cinema  Theatres,  a  recital  of  whose  career  as  a  producer  of  n  arid  famous  Comic-Operas, 

makes  interesting  reading. 


SUCCESS  spelt  with  a  capital  S  sums  up  Mr. 
Horace  Sedger's  career  as  a  provider  of  popular 
entertainments  for  the  people. 

Few  men  have  had  as  wide  or  as  varied  experi- 
ence as  he,  for  he  can  look  hack  over  30  years  unbroken 
record  as  a  London  lessee  and  manager.  Furthermore, 
he  is  one  of  the  very  few  who  has  made  history  during 
this  period  of  transition   in   the  annals  of  the  Stage. 

But  to  begin  at  the  beginning.  A  man  who  has 
spent  his  life  in  the  service  of  the  Stage  has  in  the 
natural  course  of  things  seen  and  experienced  many 
changes,  more  particularly  as  that  connection  lias  ranged 
over  such  a  whirl  of  theatrical  change  as  has  marked  the 
last  three  decades. 

First  Appearance  on  the  Stage. 

Mr.  Sedger  first  took  up  management  as  far  back  as 
.  when  he  became  lessee  of  the  old  Novelty  Theatre 
(now  known  as  the  Kings  wav).  Many  of  those  who 
know  him  as  one  of  the  pioneers  of  the  cinematograph 
industry,  are  unaware  of  the  fact  that  in  his  early  days 
Mr.  Sedger's  versatility  found  outlet  a^  an  acting  member 
oFhis  own  company.  Whilst  at  the  Novelty  he  made 
his  first  appearance  on  the  stage  in  the  favourite  farciai 
comedy,  "  Nita's  First."  and  later  he  put  on  "  Lalla 
Rook,"  an  immensely  popular  extravaganza,  in  which 
such  old-time  stars  as  Kate  Vaughan  'the  famous  dancer), 
Alma  Stanley.  YY.  H.  Denny,  and  Harry  Nicholls 
appeared. 

Mr.    Sedger's  Opportunity. 

Then  followed  a  partnership  with  Air.  Edgar  Bruce, 
and  the  Prince  of  Wales'  Theatre,  in  Coventry  Street, 
was  taken  over  in  1886.  Those  were  the  days  of  Gilbert- 
Sullivan  opera,  at  the  Savoy,  when  such  old-timers  as 
"Pianofore,"  "Patience,"  and  "The  Mikado,"  and  a 
long  string  of  other  successes  were  the  vogue,  and  the 
musical  play  came  into  its  own.  This  was  Mr.  Sedger's 
opportunity  Comic  opera  became  the  staple  dish  at  the 
Prince  of  Wales',  ond  one  recalls,  the  success  achieved  by 
"  La  Rernaise,"  in  which  Florence  St.  John  and  Marie 
Tempest  made  their  appearance.1 

"Dorothy." 

Then  came  the  turning  point  in  Mr.  Sedger's  career. 
Everyone  remembers  "Dorothy."  Half  London  went 
crazy  over  it.  Rabies  were  named  after  it.  Fortunes 
were  made  out  of  it ;  but  not  when  it  was  first  produced, 
ft  was  a  quite  ordinary  musical  play,  with  a  sprinkling 
of  catchy  numbers,  some  pretty  choruses,  and  a  good 
"  book."  Nothing  more.  And  it  did  not  catch  on  as 
Mr.  George  Edwardes,  its  producer,  had  anticipated. 

Bui  Mr.  Sedger  saw  opportunities  of  making  the  piece 
go,  and  negotiations  resulted  in  ;ts  transfer  to  The  Prince 


of  Wales',  on  sharing  terms,  much  to  Mr.  Edwardes' 
relief,  who  was  glad  to  be  quit  of  it.  "  Dorothy  "  was 
overhauled,  a  few  alterations  were  made  in  the  "  book  " 
and  a  new  number  was  dropped  in. 

Foundation  of  a  Fortune. 

That  new  number  made  the  opera,  and  incidentally 
was  th  foundation  of  Mr.  Sedger's  fortune.  Who  has 
not  he  ird  of  "Queen  of  my  Heart,"  the  song  which 
established  the  reputation  of  Hadyn  Coffin  as  premier 
stage  baritone?  Barrel  organs  and  bands  played  it; 
devoted  lovers  bawled  it  to  their  lady-loves  ;  parodies  of 
it  multiplied  so  rapidly  that  one  lost  count  of  their 
number.  Meanwhile  crowds  struggled  to  get  into  the 
theatre  ;  the  piece  ran  for  850  nights,  and  for  a  further 
period  at  the  Lyric— a  record  in  those  days  for  a  musical 
piece — and,  with  35  per  cent,  as  his  share  of  the  net 
tak;ngs,  Mr.  Horace  Sedger  made  a  small  fortune. 

When  the  run  of  "Dorothy"  terminated,  a  contract 
was  entered  into  with  the  late  Carl  Rosa,  and  among  the 
productions  which  followed  one  another,  with  unvarying 
success,and  for  which  Mr.  Horace  Sedger  was  responsible, 
were  "Paul  Jones,"  "La  Cigale"  (perhaps  the  most 
important  of  the  series),  "  L' Enfant  Prodigue,"  "The 
Mountebanks."  and  "  His  Excellency." 

Pictures  for  the  People. 

Such  a  record  of  successful  management,  with  all  its 
invaluable  experience,  naturally  stood  Mr.  Sedger  in  good 
stead  when  he  turned  his  attention  in  the  direction  of  the 
more  popular  form  of  entertainment — Pictures  for  the 
People.  The  pioneer  always  points  the  way,  and  what 
Mr  Sedger  does  not  know  to-day  about  picture  theatres 
is  hardly  worth  knowing. 

Seated  in  his  comfortable  sanctum,  surrounded  by 
mementoes  of  the  days  when  he  was  one  of  the  princes 
of  the  comic  opera  world,  I  recently  persuaded  Mr. 
Sedger  to  talk  of  his  theatrical  experience  generally,  and 
of  electric  theatres  in  particular.  His  recollections  were 
full  of  interest  for  the  playgoer  of  the  eighties  and 
nineties,  when  his  plays  were  the  talk  of  London, 

"Our  First  Enterprise." 

He  recalled  his  association  with  Mr.  Edward 
Laurillard,  when  they  started  the  pioneer  company,  the 
Electric  Theatres,  Ltd.  After  establishing  four  houses 
for  the  undertaking,  they,  however,  severed  their  con- 
nection with  it,  and  eventually,  in  company  started  the 
now  well  known  and  successful  enterprise,  Electric 
Palaces,  Ltd. 

"  Our  first  enterprise,"  said  Mr.  Sedger,  "  was  the 
now  famous  Marble  Arch  Picture  Theatre,  which 
immediately  caught  on.  We  opened  this  house  on 
November  gth,  190S,  and  well  do  I  remember  our  first 
night.     To-day  I  think  we  may  justly  claim  that  it  is  the 


February,   1012. 


THE    CINEMA. 


19 


JllHjflfflH 

Mr.  HORACE  SEDGER. 

Star  Pie 

to  Co. 

.  _, . 

A    CINEMATOGRAPH     CELEBRITY. 


20 


THE   CINEMA. 


February,   1912. 


best  theatre  of  its  kind  in  the  country.  But  I  don't 
mind  admitting  that  we  started  it  on  the  wrong  lines 
We  tried  to  work  it  on  the  American  principle.  Our 
prices  were  too  low,  and  we  naturally  attracted  the  wrong 
class  of  people." 

"  But  experience  remedied  this.  To-day  we  can  boast 
that  our  audiences  are  the  most  fashionable  to  be  found 
at  any  picture  house  in  London,  and  we  were  the  first 
people  to  charge  2s.  6d.  for  the  best  seats.  It  was  a 
somewhat  risky  innovation,  but  circumstances  warranted 
it,  and  we  have  never  regretted  taking  the  step." 

"  Once  we  had  established  the  Marble  Arch  Palace 
others  soon  followed  in  various  parts  of  London,  and 
to-day  Electric  Palaces,  Ltd.,  owns  ten  houses  in  the 
suburbs,  on  which  over  £'130,000  has  been  spent,  and 
we  are  always  on  the  look  out  for  future  developments." 

"The  Irritating  Flicker." 

"  Do  I  think  that  the  picture  theatre  has  reached 
finality  ?  Why,  my  dear  fellow,  the  industry  is  only  in 
its  infancy.  The  history  of  the  cinema  film  is  one  of 
development  and  improvement  all  along  the  line. 
Compare  the  pictures  of  to-day  with  those  of  five  years 
ago,  tor  instance.  The  irritating  flicker  has  given  place 
to  perfect  steadiness  ;  the  noisy  whirr  has  gone  for  ever. 
But — there  is  still  room  for  improvement — heaps  of 
improvement — and  it's  coming  every  day." 

"In  what  direction  ?  Ah  !  ask  the  film  people.  First 
of  all  coloured  pictures  will  be  the  thing  of  the  future. 
They  make  for  realism  and  life.  The  people  like  them 
— we  all  like  them — and  they  help  the  business.  But 
some  of  the  black-and-white  films  are  almost — yes,  I  may 


say,  quite— as  fine;  quite  as  stirring  ;  quite  as  attractive 
— instance  the  magnificent  series  of  pictures  of  the  Delhi 
Durbar  which  are  now  delighting  crowded  houses  all 
over  the  country." 

Picture  Palaces  and  the  Drama. 

"Do  I  think  that  the  picture  theatre  will  ultimately 
hurt  the  ordinary  drama  house  ?  Well,  no.  To  be 
quite  candid,  I  think  there  is  room  for  us  all,  and  I  have 
had  a  little  experience  of  both,"  said  Mr.  Sedger,  with  a 
twinkle  in  his  eye.  "  A  good  picture  show  stimulates  the 
taste  for  dramatic  fare,  and  films  depicting  such  shows 
as  Sir  Herbert  Tree  and  his  company  in  '  Henry  VIII,' 
popularise  the  play,  and  draw  the  people  to  the  theatre 
proper,  which  is  good  for  both  of  us." 

Sunday  Shows. 

"  What  about  Sunday  shows  ?  Well,  what  about 
them  ?  If  we  don't  object  to  give  them,  and  the  public 
don't  object  to  go  to  them,  what  other  possible  objection 
can  there  be  ?  There  is  no  case  against  seven  days 
opening.  People  can  go  to  church  first,  and  see  the 
pictures  afterwards,  if  they  want  to,  and  those  who  do 
not  want  to  go  to  church  find  them  a  veritable  boon — 
don't  you  think  so  ?  " 

"  You  know  what  the  London  streets  were  like  before 
the  advent  of  the  picture  palace  on  Sunday.  The  people 
had  nowhere  to  go,  and  nothing  to  do,  and  so  they " 

"  But  there  —  you  can 
tell  that  part  of  the  story 
better  than  I." 


^W^Wyteu^ 


Frazzi  Fireproof  Construction,  Ltd., Essex  55SSS stree' 

PHONE    9513    CENTRAL. 

Experts  in  Picture  Theatre  Building.      Specialists  in  Fireproofing  to  meet  all  requirements. 


Builders  of 
The  Grove 
Theatre 
Stratford. 

The 

Gravesend 
Cinema. 

The 

Corner 

Theatre 

Tottenham 


Now 

Building 
Muswell  Hill 
Theatre  on 
the  Frazzi 
System,  hy 
which  a 
Fireproof 
Theatre  can 
be  built 
at  one  half 
the  cost  of 
brick. 


THE     GROVE     PICTURE     THEATRE,     STRATFORD,     ESSEX. 


February,    1912. 


THE   CINEMA. 


21 


L 


The  Future  oj  the  Cinema  Industry.—  Big  v.  Small 
Theatres. — Three  New  Mammoth  Enterprises  in  the  West 
End. 

BY  this  title  I  refer  to  all  cinematograph  theatres 
now  built,  or  in  course  of  construction  ;  all 
theatres,  music  and  other  halls  suitable  for  this 
class  of  entertainment  ;  all  building  sites  and 
premises  in  suitable  positions  and  having  the  requisite 
capacity  for  carrying  on  a  theatre  with  the  necessary 
facilities  for  exits — I  refer  to  all  these  properties  in 
London,  and  the  whole  of  England  and  Wales,  Scotland 
and  Ireland. 

At 

It  is  now  nearly  three  years  ago  since  I  obtained  the  first 
property  for  Electric  Palaces,  Ltd. — their  celebrated 
Marble  Arch  Palace — and  a  few  weeks  after  I  obtained 
for  Mr.  Pvke  his  first  theatre,  viz.,  in  Edgware  Road. 
Peculiar  to  relate,  these  two  are  among  the  greatest 
successes  for  their  respective  companies. 

Why  is  this  ?  In  my  opinion  it  is — firstly,  the  position  ; 
secondly,  the  management;  and  thirdly,  the  construction 
and  arrangement  of  the  theatres  from  their  commence- 
ment. 

"«* 

It  was  the  opening  of  these  two  theatres  that  was 
really  the  commencement  of  the  London  cinematograph 
theatre,  although  for  some  time  after  that  the  market 
(i.e.  owners  of  property)  were  very  slow  in  realizing  the 
opportunities  of  making  money  out  of  any  suitable 
properties  they  had  in  good  positions. 

Properties  in  good  thoroughfares  with  small  frontages 
where  any  old  and  dilapidated  properties  in  the  rear 
could  be  obtained,  have  realized  unthought-of  prices. 
In  many  cases  old  cottages  out  of  repair,  let  weekly,  to 
bad  tenants,  have  been  pulled  down,  and  a  handsome 
theatre  has  been  erected.  The  landlord  is  in  receipt  of 
(in  many  cases)  double  the  rent  he  was  receiving  before. 
Instead  of  a  troublesome  weekly  collection,  with  the 
resultant  hand-constantly-in-pocket  for  repairs,  rates, 
taxes,  insurance,  and  empties,  he  collects  his  rent  from 
an  excellent  tenant  quarterly,  who  at  the  same  time  pays 
the  whole  of  the  outgoings.  He  also  looks  after  the 
property,  and  the  landlord  is  happily  looking  forward  to 
a  valuable  reversion  at  the  end  of  his  tenant's  lease. 

\\  hat  a  boon,  therefore,  in  over  600  cases  the  cine- 
matograph theatre  has  been  to  London  alone,  and  m 
over  4,000  instances  to  the  rest  of  the  country.  It  must 
be  remembered,  however,  that  the  landlords  are  not  the 
only  persons  to  benefit.  The  L.C.C.,  the  parochial 
authorities,  and  the  country  at  large,  each  draw  their 
share  owing  to  the  largely  increased  tax  and  rate  receipts 
derived  from  cinema  properties,  not  to  speak  of  the 
enormous  number  of  people  which  they  are  employing. 


It  therefore  behoves  the  authorities  to  move  with  the 
greatest  caution  in  the  direction  of  making  any  new 
laws  or  stipulations  regarding  cinematograph  theatres. 
Such  authorities  as  the  various  councils  and  governing 
bodies  in  the  respective  counties,  should,  before  ham- 
pering the  business,  look  well  at  the  facts  of  previously 
empty  properties  now  bringing  in  large  amounts  to  the 
relief  of  the  rates,  especially,  as  in  most  cases,  they  do 
not  err  on  the  wrong  side  (for  themselves)  in  under- 
assessing  this  class  of  property. 

"». 

The  cinematograph  theatre  market  at  present  has  not 
settled  itself  down,  and  most  people  are  still  continuing 
to  guess  as  to  what  the  ultimate  state  of  it  will  be.  Some 
say  it  will  lie  the  survival  of  the  fittest — meaning  that 
the  largest  and  handsomest  theatres  will  outlive  the 
smaller  ones. 

It  is  a  question.  But,  in  my  opinion,  the  smaller 
theatres  will  survive  for  many  years  to  come,  subject  to 
good  management. 

A* 

Large  theatres  are  still  continuing  to  be  built.  In 
fact,  three  of  the  largest  in  London  will  shortly  be  put 
up  in  the  heart  of  the  West-End.  In  one  case,  of  which 
I  could  give  details,  if  I  so  wished,  an  expenditure  alto- 
gether of  ,£"130,000  is  involved.  In  another  case,  a  mini- 
mum amount  of  ^"60,000  has  been  agreed  to  be  spent 
under  the  contract  ;  and  in  yet  a  third,  nearly  ^100,000 
has  been  laid  out  in  acquiring  the  freeholds,  and  now  the 
building  has  to  be  erected. 

This  startling  information  is,  I  think,  enough  to  go  on 
with.  In  the  next  issue  of  The  Cinema,  I  may,  perhaps, 
be  allowed  to  print  names  and  full  details. 

imt 

I  see  that  some  of  our  contemporaries  have  got  hold 
of  one  or  two  of  these  facts,  but  as  I  have  been  the  party 
most  directly  concerned  in  carrying  out  the  negotiations, 
it  has  amused  me  very  much  to  read  their  comments. 


Meanwhile,  you  will  let  me  add  that  your  readers  may 
always  fully  and  confidently  rely  upon  all  information 
given  in  these  columns  by 


THE    HEPWORTH    STOCK    COMPANY 

On  page  17  we  have  pleasure  in  reproducing  the  portraits  of  four 
members  of  the  famous  Hepworth  Manufacturing  Company's 
Stock  Company.  Miss  Gladys  Sylvani  is  one  of  the  most  popular 
English  picture  actresses  of  the  present  day.  Before  joining  the 
Hepworth  Company  she  gained  a  wide  experience  in  drama  and 
musical  comedy,  having  played  at  the  Gairty  and  in  "  The 
Arcadians."  Miss  Chrissie  White  has  been  with  the  Company  since 
she  was  eleven  years  old,  and  young  as  she  is  has  played  leading 
parts  in  most  of  the  big  picture  plays  issued  by  this  firm.  Mr.  Hay 
Plumb  is  another  recruit  from  the  stage,  where  he  played  comedy 
parts  in  all  the  Gilbert-Sullivan  Operas.  Mr.  Harry  Royston 
has  had  a  long  English  and  Continental  experience  as  a  panto- 
mimist,  and  was  principal  comedian  for  Fred  Karno's  production 
in  this  country  and  America. 


•22 


THE    CINEMA. 


February.    J  912. 


WHAT    IS    NON-FLAM?    A    TEST    CASE. 

A  CASE  of  the  utmost  importance  to  the  trade  was  recently 
beard  at  Folkestone.  The  Victoria  Pier  Syndicate, 
Folkestone,  were  summoned  under  the  Cinematograph 
Act  for  having  given  an  exhibition  of  pictures,  using  for 
the  purpose,  alleged  intiammable  films  on  unlicensed 
premises.  The  Syndicate  pleaded  "  not  guilty,"  admitting  that  the 
Pavilion  was  unlicensed,  and  advanced  the  defence  that  they  were 
using  non-flam  films. 

The  prosecution  contended  that  the  films,  when  tested  by  the 
authorities,  were  undoubtedly  inflammable,  that  is  to  say,  when  set 
fire  to,  they  flamed.  According  to  the  definition  of  the  word 
"inflammable  "  in  several  modern  dictionaries,  anything  that  wa>- 
"  capable  of  being  inflamed  or  set  on  fire,  susceptible  of  combustion, 
easily  set  on  fire  "  was  covered  by  the  use  of  this  word  in  the  Act, 
and  as  Parliament  had  left  it  to  be  interpreted  in  a  general  sense, 
not  specifying  that  the  films  in  question  should  be  tested  in  the 
lantern  or  in  any  special  manner,  the  Town  Clerk,  who  conducted 
the  prosecution,  contended  that  the  defendants,  having  no  license, 
had  contravened  the  Act,  and  were  liable  to  a  fine. 

Questioned  by  the  defence,  the  Chief  Constable  testified  that  he 
had  visited  the  Pier,  finding  a  perfoi  mance  in  progress.  He  had 
tested  the  films  by  applying  a  light  to  pieces  of  film  that  the 
operater  had  unwound  off  ten  spools.  Nine  of  the  pieces  caught 
fire  and  flamed.  Mr.  Forsyth,  managing  director,  showed  him  an 
invoice  from  the  London  firm,  who  guaranteed  the  films  to  be 
non-flam,  and  claimed  that  the  test  was  not  a  fair  one,  and  that  the 
films  should  be  tested  in  the  lantern. 

Mr.  J.  Jackman,  an  electrician,  was  called  tor  the  defence,  and 
said  that,  on  invitation,  he  visited  the  Victoria  Pier,  and  earned 
out  tests  of  film  in  the  lantern.  He  found  that  the  non-flam  film 
when  exposed  to  the  concentrated  heat  of  the  light,  burned  without 
flame,  whereas  a  piece  of  ordinary  film  flashed  up  at  once. 

Several  witnesses  explained  ihe  difference  between  non-flam  and 
ordinary  film  and  their  relation  to  the  licensing  of  halls,  and  the 
importance  of  this  case  to  the  cinematograph  trade. 

Mr.  Forsyth  contended  that  the  films  be  had  been  using  were  non- 
inflammable  within  the  meaning  of  the  Act.  The  magistrates  retired, 
and  for  half-an-hour  considered  their  decision.  Finally  they  came 
to  the  conclusion,  that  as  the  Act  and  the  regulations  of  the  Home 
Secretary  did  not  define  the  term  "  inflammable, "  the  dictionary- 
decision  must  stand,  and  that,  therefore,  the  films  in  question  came 
under  this  definition  They  had  no  option  but  to  convict,  imposing 
a  fine  of  £5  and  14s.  cost. 

Notice  of  appeal  was  immediately  given. 


Mr.  Robert  Forsyth,  the  lessee  of  the  Victoria  Pier,  Folkestone, 
was  subsequently  summoned  for  showing  films  on  a  Sunday 
without  a  licence. — A  lull  apparatus  was  produced  in  court,  an 
exhibition  being  given  to  show  the  non-inflammability  of  "  Non- 
flam  "  films,  and  the  rapid  ignition  of  certain  celluloid  films. — The 
Bench  retired  for  a  considerable  time,  and  on  returning  the  chair- 
man said,  "  The  case  is  a  very  difficult  one.  This  Act,  like  a  great 
many  other  Acts,  was  passed  in  a  hurry.  There  seems  to  be  no 
definite  instructions  as  to  inflammability.  V\  e  are  prepared  to 
state  a  case,  and  should  like  this  settled  by  appeal."  A  fine  of 
os.  and  12s.  costs  was  imposed. 


ANOTHER  CASE. 

The  Bedlington  (Northumberland)  Magistrates  have  given  a 
decision  of  importance  to  Picture  Theatre  Proprietors  on  the  same- 
point,   in  connection   with   the  police  prosecution  of  Mr.  Walter 


Lawoon,  ol  the  Star  Picture  Theatre,  Choppington.  As  will  be 
seen  from  the  subjoined  evidence,  the  question  at  issue  was  whether 
films  declared  non-inflamable,  were  subject  to  license  under  the 
Act. 

inspector  Culley  said  he  asked  defendant  if  he  had  a  license,  and 
he  replied  that  he  was  showing  non-inflammable  films,  and  did  not 
require  one.  On  the  following  night  witness  found  another 
exhibition  of  pictures  in  progress.  He  said  he  w ished  to  have 
some  of  the  films  tested,  to  see  if  they  were  inflammable,  and 
defendant  gave  him  pieces  from  five  pictures.  One  of  them  lighted 
quite  easily  when  tested.  The  other  four  were  non-flammable. 
For  the  defence  it  was  utged  that  the  matter  was  one  of  great 
importance,  affecting  picture  halls  throughout  the  country.  When 
1  he  Cinematograph  Act  was  passed  in  1909,  non-flammable  films 
were  scarcely  known,  and  the  Act  did  not  contemplate  that  non- 
flammable films  would  come  into  general  use.  Inflammable  in  that 
case  meant,  practically-  speaking,  anything  that  would  burn.  What 
w  as  termed  non-flammable,  was  never  intended  to  be  covered  under 
the  section.  As  a  matter  of  fact,  non-flammable  films  were  used  at 
concerts,  bioscope  entertainments,  and  the  like,  without  any 
restrictions.  They  might  as  well  say  that  gas  or  electricity  used 
in  showing  pictures  on  the  screen  also  came  under  the  section. 
Mr.  Percy  Longhorn,  of  the  North  of  England  Film  Bureau,  for 
the  defence,  said,  the  films  involved  were  supplied  bv  his  firm  to 
the  defendants.  They  were  non-inflammable,  and  films  allowed  to 
to  be  used  without  a  license. 

The  Bench,  however,  was  not  satisfied  that  two  pieces  of  the 
films  were  non-flammable  and  imposed  a  fine  of  £1  and  costs.  An 
appeal  was  entered. 


STILL  ANOTHER. 

A  non-flam  case  was  recently  dismissed  at  Castle  Fden  Petty- 
Sessions.  The  owner  of  a  cinematograph  theatre  was  summoned 
for  showing  on  two  Sundays  without  a  license.  He  pleaded  that 
as  11  Mi-flam  films  were  used,  under  the  Cinematograph  Act.no 
license  was  required.     The  Bench  dismissed  the  case. 

WHAT  IS  A  FACTORY? 

An  important  case  was  recently  decided  at  Bacup,  when  Messrs. 
Clenville  &  Osmond  were  summoned  for  breaches  of  the  Factory 
Acts  at  the  Bacup  Public  Hall.  Mr.  H.  E.  Brother,  H.M.  Inspec- 
tor, said  that  when  he  v  isited  the  premises  there  was  no  abstract  of 
the  Factory  Acts  exhibited,  and  the  flywheel  of  the  gas  engine  and 
other  machinery  was  unfenced.  Electrical  generating  stations 
were  included  in  the  Factory  Acts.  For  the  defendants,  Mr 
Brother  was  asked  to  cite  a  case  where  a  cinematograph  show  hail 
been  held  to  be  a  factory,  as  they  did  not  generate  electricity  in 
bulk  for  trade  or  manufacturing  purposes.  Mr.  Brother  said 
electricity  was  being  generated  for  a  public  hall  and  that  was  the 
only  point  they  were  concerned  with. 

Holding  that  it  was  a  factory  within  the  meaning  of  the  Act,  the 
Bench  ordered  defendants  to  pay  is.  and  costs  for  not  fencing  the 
machinery,  and  costs  for  not  fixing  the  abstract. 


MEMS. 


At  Sheffield  Police  Court,  YVm.  Hy.  Marshall,  Junr.,  was 
summoned  for  keeping  a  cinematograph  show  without  a  license. 
Defendant  pleaded  he  had  bought  the  show  on  the  hire-purchase 
system  and  held  a  license  in  the  name  of  the  original  proprietor. 
It  was  decided  that  a  technical  offence  had  been  committed,  and 
defendant  was  fined  10s. 

The  petition  of  the  Selig  Polyscope  Co.  for  the  winding  up  of 
the  Safety  Bioscope  Supplies,  Ltd.,  was  held  up  with  the  assent  of 
the  other  creditors  as  there  seemed  to  be  some  doubt  as  to  whether 
the  Company  could  not  pay  its  debts.  The  petition  is  to  stand 
over  till  the  first  day  of  the  next  sitttngs. 


The  excellence  of  English  cinematograph  theatre  construction  has 
long  been  noted  abroad  and  many  of  our  most  prominent  con- 
tractors have  had  experience  overseas.  Mr.  Farrell,  the  managing 
director  of  Messrs.  Farrell  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Hampstead,  was  in  charge 
of  the  building  of  the  Beunos  Ayres  Palacio  de  Novedades,  one  of 
the  largest  and  most  popular  picture  palaces  in  the  Argentine 
Republic. 


February,    1912. 


THE    CINEMA. 


28 


MISLEADING    THE    PUBLIC: 

SCARE    CONTENTS    BILLS. 


CERTAIN  of  the  daily  papers  are  none  too  careful 
as  to  the  accuracy  of  the  lines  on  their  contents 
bills.      They  are  avowedly  drafted    to  sell   the 
paper,   and   provided  the  matter    is  kept  within 
reasonable  limits,  no  harm  is  done. 

But  there  are  occasions  when  a  carelessly  worded 
poster  may  inflict  untold  injury  upon  on  entire  trade, 
and  the  recent  fire  at  Chesterfield  is  a  case  in  point. 
Some  of  the  papers  issued  scare  posters  announcing  a 
"  Terrible  Fire  at  a  Picture  Theatre "  ;  "  Children 
Burned  in  a  Picture  Palace,"  and  other  equally  mislead- 
ing lines. 

The  truth  of  the  matter  is  that  there  was  no  lire  in  a 
picture  theatre  at  all.  The  outbreak  actually  occurred 
in  an  adjoining  cottage,  which  was  being  used  for  the 
time  as  a  dressing-room  for  a  number  of  children  who 
were  taking  part  in  a  special  scena  at  the  picture  palace. 

Grossly  Misleading  Posters. 

To  make  such  an  occurrence  an  excuse  for  the  issue 
of  grossly  misleading  posters,  is  to  say  the  least  of  it 
highly  reprehensible,  and  proprietors  and  managers  of 
cinematograph  theatres  were  up  in  arms  at  this  un- 
warrantable reflection  upon  their  business.  The  trade 
was  not  without  its  champions  however,  and  Messrs. 
Harris  &  Gillow,  the  cinematograph  theatre  experts, 
sent  a  letter  of  protest  to  the  daily  press,  of  which  they 
have  favoured  us  with  the  following  copy  : 

A  timely  Protest. 

"  We  are  in  such  close  touch  with  the  cinematograph  trade,  that 
we  think  they  will  consider  it  only  fair  to  them,  and  to  the  public 
generally,  that  the  real  facts  in  connection  with  the  recent  lament- 
able fire  at  Chesterfield,  should  be  correctly  stated. 

"  The  fire  did  not  occur  in  a  cinematograph  theatre  at  all,  as 
some  of  the  papers  stated  on  their  contents  bills,  but  in  an  adjoining 
cottage,  used  as  a  dressing-room  for  the  time  being — a  very 
different   thing   altogether.      It  seems  a  great   pity   that  such  an 


incorrect  statement  should  have  been  made,  for  it  is  calculated  to 
give  a  set  back  to  a  trade  in  which  many  thousands  of  people  find 
employment,  in  providing  innocent  amusement  for  the  British 
public." 

Aggravating  the  Offence. 

Such  a  protest  was  most  timely,  for  the  public  is  apt 
to  be  influenced  far  more  by  such  misleading  statements 
than  some  people  think.  Furthermore,  coming  as  it  did 
just  before  the  Christmas  holidays,  it  might  have  had 
most  disastrous  effect  upon  the  attendance  at  many  ot 
the  smaller  picture  palaces  in  the  country.  Little  real 
harm  was  done  at  the  moment,  but  we  must  protest 
most  strongly  at  the  same  sort  of  tactics  being  adopted 
when  the  report  of  the  adjourned  inquest  appeared  in  the 
middle  of  January. 

The  trade  is  not  likely  to  soon  forget  what  looks  un- 
commonly like  a  dead  set  at  the  business  by  certain 
papers,  and  when  the  time  comes  for  them  to  ask  for 
favours  in  the  shape  of  contributions  to  advertising 
revenue,  there  will  be  a  good  many  point  blank  refusals 

"  D.T."  and  the  Picture  Palace. 

One  of  the  chief  offenders  is  a  well  known  daily 
paper,  and  we  are  glad  to  see  that  despite  its 
attempts  to  obtain  support  in  this  direction,  such  efforts 
have  thus  far  been  unavailing.  On  the  other  hand  it  is 
pleasant  to  find  so  well-informed  an  organ  as  the  "  Daily 
Telegraph"  eulogising  the  picture  theatre  and  its  educa 
five  influence,  and  in  the  course  of  a  particularly 
informative  article  quoting  the  words  of  an  official  as 
saying  that  "  A  cinematograph  exhibition  is  one  of  the 
safest  places  in  London,  and  is  infinitely  safer  than  the 
streets." 

Which  statement  is  an  excellent  antidote  to  the  sense- 
less tirades  of  certain  of  the  daily  papers,  and  should  go 
a  long  way  towards  laying  the  bogey  conjured  up  by  the 
yellow  press. 


Telephone  No 

0^04  Gerranl. 


Telegraphic  Address  : 
"Grampires,  London. 


LONDON  BIOSCOPE  SCHOOL 

9,    ST.     MARTIN'S     COURT, 
CHARING   CROSS   ROAD,  W.C. 


All  those  wanting  Experienced 

OPERATORS   and  ASSISTANTS 

apply  as  above. 


NOTICE. 

The  Manager  will  esteem  it  a  favour  if  readers  of 
THE  CINtMA  will  kindly  mention  the  name  of  the 
paper  when  communicating  with  any  firm  in  regard 
to  advertisements  or  properties  referred  to  therein. 


Technical,  Educa- 
tional, Scientific, 
Medical  and  all  other 
subjects. 

Second-hand  at  Half 
Prices!  New  at 25  per 
cent,  discount. 

Catalogue  No.  207  Fr^e.        State  Wants.        Hooks  Sent  on  Approval. 
BOOKS   BOUGHT:    Best  Prices  Given. 

W.  &  G.  FOYLE,  135,  Charing  Cross  Rd.,  London,  W.C. 


24 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


AX   interim  dividend  of   10   per   cent,  per  annum  has  been 
declared  by  Dublin  Electric  Theatres.  Ltd. 
The  Ramsgate  ard  District  Popular  Amusements  Co., 
has  increased  their  dividend  to   15  per  cent.,  originally 
declared,  to  one  of  20  per  cent. — Congratulations. 

A  gross  profit  of  £5,505  has  been  made  by  the  Rhyl  Palace, 
Arcade  and  Hotel  Company  during  the  past  year.  Further 
developments  are  promised  in  the  near  future  which  will  attract  a 
large  increase  of  patrons,  and  should  incidentally  swell  the  dividend. 

Biograph  Theatres,  Ltd.,  has  paid  an  aggregate  dividend  of  10 
per  cent,  on  the  year's  working  besides  adding  a  further  sum  of 
£1,000  to  reserve,  and  writing  off  £1,187  f°r  depreciation. 


MEETINGS. 


At  a  meeting  of  the  New  Cinema  Ltd.,  Mr.  Reginald  Waller, 
Chairman  of  the  Company  said  that  the  outlook  in  connection  with 
the  Mirror  Picture  Palace,  Putney,  opened  in  December,  was  most 
promising.  They  were  about  to  open  another  hall  and  had  also  in 
progress  negotiations  for  running  several  others,  and  the  Directors 
confidently  looked  forward  to  being  able  to  show  that  a  good  deal 
could  be  done  with  the  moderate  capital. 

Mr.  J.  Schack-Sommer,  Chairman,  announced  at  the  Ordinary 
General  Meeting  of  the  Fultomatograph  Syndicate.  Ltd.,  that  since 
the  last  meeting  Captain  Otto  Fulton  had  been  able  to  take  out  new 
patents  which  enabled  him  to  take  and  reproduce  animation  in 
true  natural  colours,  with  all  the  colours  of  the  spectrum,  and  not 
a  compromise  of  the  two-coloured  process  hitherto  in  use.  Experts 
were  confident  that  this  invention  would  undoubtedly  mean  a  new 
era  in  the  cinematograph  world. 


NEW    COMPANIES. 


Premier  Bioscope,  Ltd. — Capital  £1.500,  in  £1  Shares.  Picture 
Shows.     Private  Company.     1,  Albion  Street,  Leeds. 

Seaside  Cinemas,  Ltd. — Capital  £100,  in  £1  Shares.  Cinema- 
tograph Entertainers      Private  Company.    5.  Waterloo  Place,  S.W. 

Biofix  (Foreign  Rights)  Ltd. — Capital  £100,  in  £1  Shares. 
Takers  and  Exhibitors  of  Moving  Pictures.  Private  Company. 
14 — 15,  Conduit  Street,  W. 

Biofix  Syndicate  (Leeds)  Ltd. — Capital  £1.500,  in  £1  Shares. 
Takers  and  Exhibitors  of  Moving  Pictures.  Private  Company 
82,  Shaftesbury  Avenue.  W.C. 

Jenkinson's  Pictures.  Ltd — Capital  £6,000,  in  £1  Shares. 
Cinematograph  Entertainers      Private  Company. 

Birmingham  Cinema  de  Lux,  Ltd. — Capital  £5.000,  in  4,500 
Ordinary  Shares  of  £1,  and  10,000  Deferred  of  is.  Private 
Company. 

Kilburn  and  Hacknev  Pictuke  Palaces,  Ltd. — Capital  £3.250, 
in  £1  Shares.     Cinema  Entertainers.     Private  Company. 

West  End  Playhouse,  Ltd. — Capital  £30,000,  in  £1  Shares. 
Entertainment  Caterers.     219,  St.  Vincent  Street.  Glasgow. 

Hamilton  Picture  House,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £t  Shares. 
Entertainment  Proprietors.      Private  Company. 

Armadale  Picturedrome,  Ltd. — Capital  £1.000,  in  £1  Shares. 
Entertainment  Proprietors.  Private  Company.  55,  West  Regent 
Street,  Glasgow . 


Coliseum  (Edinburgh)  Co..  Ltd. — Capital  £5,000,  in  4,500 
fifteen  p.c.  participating  Preference  Shares  of  £1,  and  4.000 
Ordinary    of    is     each.      Moving    Picture     Shows,     etc.      Private 

Company. 

Lozells  Picture  Hi  ose,  Ltd.— Capital  £2.100,  in  £1  Shares 
Cinema  Proprietors.  Private  Company.  Lozells  Road,  Aston 
Birmingham. 

New  Animatophone  Syndicate.  Ltd.  — Capital  £5,000,  in  £1 
Shares.     Cinema  Appliance  Dealers,  etc.     Private  Company. 

Bloomsbury  Cinema.  Ltd. — Capital  £7,000,  in  6. JS50  Preference 
Ordinary  Shares  of  £1.  and  3.000  Deferred  Shares  of  is  Private 
Company. 

Woolwich  Arsenal.  Cinematograph,  Ltd  -  Capital  £5,000, 
in  4,900  Cumulative  Preference  Shares  of  £1,  and  2,000  Ordinarv 
of  is. 

Surbiton  Cinematograph  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,500,  in 
£1  Shares.  Amusement  Caterers.  Private  Company.  Dewar 
House,  Haymarket,  S.W. 

Hamilton  Picture  House,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in£i  Shares. 
Entertainment  Proprietors.  Private  Company.  Oswald  &  Sons. 
Edinburgh. 

Heath  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,000,  in  £1  Shares.  Amuse- 
ment Caterers       Private  Company.     34,  Ship  Street,  Brighton. 

Manor  Hall,  Ltd.  — Capital  £500,  in  £1  Shares.  Opera  House 
and  Cinema  Exhibitors.  Private  Company.  Selwyn  Hall,  West 
Kirby,  Cheshire. 

Wallgate  Cinema,  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,500  in  £1  Shares. 
Entertainment  Proprietors.     Private  Company. 

Bloomsbury  Cinema,  Ltd. — Capital  £7,000,  in  6,850  Preference 
Ordinary  Shares  of  £1  each,  and  3,000  Deferred  Shares  of  is. 
Picture  Theatre  Proprietors.     Private  Company. 

Picture  Play  Renters,  Ltd.  — Capital  £2,000,  in  £1  Shares. 
Bny,  sell,  rent,  or  make  Cinema  Films.     Private  Company. 

Preston  Film  Exchange  Co.,  Ltd — Capital  £1.000,  in  £1 
Shares.      Private  Companv. 

Burnham  Electric  Theatre.  Ltd.— Capital  £2.500,  in  £1 
Shares.  Theatre  Proprietors.  Private  Company.  17,  Above 
Bar,  Southampton. 

Muswell  Hill  Electric  Theatre,  Ltd.  — Capital  £3,000,  in 
£1  Shares,  2.000  Preference  Ordinary  and  1,000  Deferred.  Picture 
Palace  Proprietors.      Private  Company. 

Wood  &  Nicholson.  Ltd. — Capital  £3.000,  in  2,950  Ordinary 
Shares  of  £1,  and  1.000  Deferred  Shares  of  is.  Cinema  Theatre 
Proprietors.     Private  Company.     256,  Southwark  Park  Road,  S.E. 

Ace  Electric  Theatre  Co.,  Ltd.— Capital  £3,000,  in  £1 
Shares.  Cinema  Proprietors.  Private  Company.  504,  Coventry 
Road,  Small  Heath,  Birmingham. 

Swinton  Empire,  Ltd.  —  Capital  £4.000,  in  1,000  7  per  cent. 
Cumulative  Preference,  2.300  Ordinary,  and  700  Deferred  Shares 
of  £1  each  Erect  and  carry  on  Cinema  Theatre.  3,  Ridgefield. 
King  Street,  Manchester. 

Biofix  (Blackpool)  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £1  Shares. 
Exhibitors  of  Moving  Pictures,  etc.  Private  Company.  20,  Great 
Winchester  Street,  EC. 

Vint's  Theatres,  Ltd. — Capital  £20,000  in  £1  shares.  Enter- 
tainment.    Private  Company. 

Biofix  (Southern  Counties)  Ltd.  Capital  £2,500,  in  £1 
Shares.  Moving  Picture  Exhibitors,  etc.  Private  Company. 
20,  Great  Winchester  Street,  E.C. 

"G.M.B."  Halls  Syndicate,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,000,  in  5s. 
Shares.     Electric  Theatre  Proprietors.     Private  Company. 


A     VISUAL    AND    AUDITORY    WORLD. 

By  means  of  the  cinematograph  and  phonograph,  had  they 
been  invented  in  his  time,  we  might  now  see  Bismarck,  that 
intellectual  and  physical  giant  of  abounding  energy,  and  hear  his 
voice  as  he  uttered  the  words  that  have  shaped  (lie  destinies  of 
European  Governments!  Again  could  we  have  the  ("rations  of 
Gladstone  or  Beaconsfield  delivered  before  countless  thousands; 
thus  the  nation's  prophets  and  poets  would  live  again,  having  risen 
from  the  oblivion  of  printed  documents  into  the  visual  and 
auditorv'  world.  -  lu  ening  Neu  =. 


February,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


25 


Important  and  Novel  North  London  Enterprise. 

Educative  Entertainments  for  the  People. 

A   New  Force  for  Uplifting  the  Masses. 


THE   Prospectus  of  a   most  important  enterprise  under  the 
title  of  The  Social  Service  Educative  Entertainments, 
Ltd.,  will,  we  understand,  be  issued  in  the  course  of  the 
next    few   days   with   a  capital  of   £40,000,   which   it    is 
hoped  will    mark  a   new  epoch   in   the  entertainment  ol 
the    people.      There    will    he    a    first    issue    of    20,000    fully    paid 
shares   of    £1    each,  on    which    the    promotors    confidently    expect 
a  7  per  cent,  dividend  may  he  relied. 

Social  Service. 

From  the  prospectus  we 


brick  walls  and  red  brick  facings. and  the  tower  and  front  elevation 
is  to  be  of  Ferro-concrete,  with  Portland  cement  decorative  work. 

A  £22,000  Building. 


ather  "that  the  most  important  featun 

s   the   prevalent 


fur 

ela 
hal 
wil 
ab( 

wil 


tie  e- 
nishinj 

borate 

1  with 

lead 

e  tin 

lead 


timated  cost  of    tl 
g   and    equipment 


ol    national    lite    to-day 

interest   manifested    by   the   higher  social 

(lasses  in  the  welfare  of  the  people." 

One  of  the  chief  objects  o>f  the  Company 
will  be  to  build  Educational  Entertain- 
ment flails  and  Cinematograph  Theatres, 
the  first  of  which  will  be  situate;l  in  High 
Street,  Islington,  in  close  proximity  to 
the    well-known   hostelry,  "fhe   Angel." 

"Social  Service  oil  sound  business 
principles"  is  the  key-note  ol  the  under- 
taking which  is  promoted  by  Mr.  Abraham 
Lavis,  the  well-known  founder  oi  the 
London  Housing  Society,  which,  under 
the  highest  patronage,  has  dune  such  a 
magnificent  work  in  recent  years  in  pro- 
viding good  sanitary  homes  lor  the  worker, 
ami  thereby  uplifting  the  hardworking 
masses  ol  this  great  City.  To  mention 
the  fact  that  Mr.  Davis  will  be  the  chair- 
man ol  this  undertaking,  which  hopes  to 
do  so  much  in  the  way  of  educating,  as 
well  as  elevating  and  improving  the  taste 
ol  the  working  classes  of  London,  is  a 
guarantee  that  everything  will  be  carried 
out  on  business-like  lines,  equally  bene- 
ficial to  the  shareholders  and  public. 

Genesis  of  a  Vast  Scheme. 

The  magnificent  new  Hall  which  is  to 
be  built  at  Islington  is  the  genesis  of  what 
is  hoped  will  be  a  vast  scheme  lor  the 
social  uplifting  and  educational  and 
intellectual  recreation  ol  the  people.  No 
one  knows  better  than  Mr.  Davis  what 
will  suit  the  taste  ol  the  teeming  multi- 
tudes, which  throng  the  thoroughfares  ol 
the  densely  populated  districts  on  the 
hinge  of  greater  London.  His  experience 
is  ol  so  practical  a  character  that  it 
should  help  the  new  undertaking  a  long 
wav  on  the  road  to  success.  Again, 
quoting  the  prospectus  "Enthralling 
music,  beautiful  picture;- ,  spirited  recita- 
tions, songs  of  a  patriotic  anil  pathetic 
character  appeal  to  the  people,"  and  such 
an  entertainment  cannot  but  have  the 
most  elevating  effect  upon   them 

A  Striking  Front. 

Under  sound  and  progressive  nvmagement,  and  given  the  class 
of  entertainment  which  appeals  to  die  people,  there  should  un- 
doubtedly be  a  big  In:  lire  lor  the  Social  Service  Educative 
Entertainment  Company.  Their  first  Hall  will  be-  situated  right 
in  the  very  heart  ol  the  Borough  of  Islington,  with  a  population  of 
•jjN.ooo.  A  palatial  building  with  accommodation 'for  between 
i  500  .mo  2,000  peisjns,  should  prove  a  boon  to  North  London. 
Its  striking  front,  of  which  a  sketch  appears  on  this  page,  will  no 
doubt  e'er  long  prove  a  popular  landmark  in  this  busy  thoroughfare, 
which  will  form  the  entrance  to  the  theatre  to  be  built  on  the  land 
at  the  rear.      This  will   be  ol   steel   and  concrete  construction   with 


building    is  about    £22,000,    including 

and    this   will    give   some   idea   of   the 

nature  of   the   undertaking.     There  will   be   an   entrance 

pay  office, and  vestibule  from  High  Street,  and  astaircase 

to  the  offices  on   the   li  st   floor        The  staff-room  will   be 

from  the  vestibule  a  handsome  flight  of  marble  stairs 

to  the  crush   hall,  and   a  further  staircase   to  the  balcony. 

'I  he  theatre  itself,  entered  from  the  crush 

hall,  will    measure   about    142-ft.   by  70-ft. 

widening    to   76-ft.      Astaircase    will    also 

le  id  to  the  balcony       Behind  the  screen 

there  will  be  two  staff- rooms  and  a  further 

staircase   leading   to  the  large  .organ    loft 

on   the   first   floor.      The  operators'   room 

at    the  end  of   the   theatre   will    be  about 

20-ft.    by    12-tt.,    ami    the    winding    room 

about     14-ft.     by     10-ft.        The     seating 

accommodation  provides  for  about  1,500, 

and  "standing  room"  for  about  300  more. 

Pleasant  Evenings  for  the  People. 

The  Social  Service  Educative  Enter- 
tainment Company,  Ltd.,  intends  to 
Utilise  very  largely  and  make  a  speciality 
ol  the  bioscope  and  gramophone  for  the 
purpose  ol  its  entertainments.  Moving 
picture  programmes  <>l  the  most  up-to- 
date  character  will  educate  as  well  as 
entertain  the  large  audiences  which  it  is 
hoped  will  be  attracted  to  the  hall.  And 
by  means  ol  the  gramophone  the  opera 
will  be  brought  within  their  reach  and 
famous  singers  will  be  heard  in  songs 
familiar  to  all.  Part  of  the  scheme  which 
it  is  intended  to  carry  out  in  the  near 
future,  will  be  the  erection  of  similar 
attractive  halls  in  the  most  Congested 
(nuts  of  London.  Again  quoting  the 
prospectus  :  "The  worker  and  his  family 
may  spend  .1  pleasant  evening  at  a  trifling 
outlay,  witnessing  an  entertainment  which 
will  tend  to  make  them  happier  and 
brighter  and  more  contented  with  their 
lot." 

It  is  hoped  that  the  new  building  will 
be  sufficiently  complete  for  opening  in 
September  next,  and  the  management  will 
be  in  the  hands  of  Mr.  Ralph  I  'avis,  with 
a  most  efficient  and  carefulh  selected 
stall  of  assistants. 


A   Bright   Outlook. 

The  future  ol   the  Companj  appears  to 

be  most  promising,  and  judging  by  the 
class  ol  entertainment,  which  we  under- 
stand, it  is  proposed  to  give,  there  should 
benolaekol  public  support,  'file  p.ositioii 
at  Islington  is  ,111  ideal  nie.  The  theatre  will  have  a  commanding 
elevation,  111  one  ol  the  h;isiesi  middle-class  thoroughfares;  it  is 
close  to  [he  Agricultural  Hall,  the  home  of  so  mail)  popular 
exhibitions  ;  it  is  adjacent  to  a  splendid  tram  and  bus  service — 
in  fact  one  ol  the  best  in  London  and  the  tubes  will  bring  people 
from  all  |  arts. 

In  common  with  many  others  in  the  cinematograph  world,  we 
shall  look  forward  to  the  inauguration  of  this  enterprise,  and  we  shall 
watch  its  luttire  development  with  keen  interest,  assured  of  the  fact 
that  if  its  promoters  maintain  the  high  ideals  which  they  have  set 
before  themselves,  it  cannot  but  reap  the  success  it  deserves. 


new   11  vi.  1. 


26 


THE     CINEMA. 


February,  1912. 


A  Priceless  Service. 


BERKS' 
Publicity 
and 
Printing 


'Phone  : 

<. in. in i    5151 


WH*T       OUR        SERVICE        MEANS 
TO     YOU. 

YOU    PLACE    ALL    YOUR      . 
ADVERTISING      &      PRINTING 

IN*   OUR  HANDS 

WE     SYSTEMATISE     YOUR  .     . 
VDVERTIS1NG 

DESIGN.    COMPLETE   AND 

print   all    your   .   . 
literature; 

we    save    you    time    and 

WORRY 

OUR      SERVICE      COSTS     YOU 
NOTHING. 

LET      US      TELL     YOU     MORE 
ABOUT    IT     

'Phone  or  write 
\ I )VE RTISE M E NT   MA NAGER, 


BERKS,  Limited, 

VERNON     HOUSE, 

Sicilian  Auenue.  Southampton  Row,  W.C. 


EXCLUSIVE 
BOOKINGS 

May  now   be  made  of  a   WONDERFUL 

KEARTON 

—   Ill    ■!■   Ill    II         Iff———— 

NATURAL  HISTORY  FILM 

(about  i,ooo-ft.  long). 
By     CHERRY      KEARTON, 

Showing  a  trip  on  an  elephant  (which   was 

caught  in    the   presence  of   King  George) 

-through    the    INDIAN    JUNGLE. — 

MARVELLOUS    PICTURES 

Ot    Jungle    Life,  showing    what    the    King 

has  been  seeing,  including  TIGER,  BISON, 

ELEPHANT,        MONKEYS,        REPTILES, 

BUTTERFLIES    AND    INSECT    LIFE.- 

Full  particulars  from 

Cherry  Kearton,  Ltd., 

DEWAR  HOUSE,  HAYMARKET,  W.C. 


Tile  "  Allefex  "  is  a  sound-effects  machine  for  accompanying 
moving  pictures.  More  than  50  different  effects  which  can  all  be 
worked  by  one  man.  All  the  effects  of  land,  sea  and  sky. 
including  battles,  trains,  motor  cars,  horses,  lightning,  etc.,  etc. 
Call  and  hear  it,  or  write  for  illustrated  list. 


Andrews  Film  Hire  Service  is  thoroughly  Up-to-date.  The  whole 
of  the  films  released  weekly  in  England  are  reviewed  by  our  own 
buyer  who  devotes  his  whole  time  to  the  work.  Programs  to 
suit  all  classes  ot  Picture  Theatres  at  the  lowest  possible  prices. 
May  we   submit   particulars  and  specimen   programs- 


ANDREWS'    PICTURES,    L 


TD.,        CINE       HOUSE,      GREEK      STREET, 
LONDON,      W.     


USEFUL     BOOKS     FOR     CINEMATOGRAPHERS. 


Practical  Dynamo  and  Motor  Management. 
I'hc  subject  is  dealt  with  in  a  thoroughl) 
practical  manner.  Many  illustrations  an 
given.     Price  6d.     Post  Free  for  7d. 

The  Modern  Bioscope  Operator.-  Proprietors 
of  Picture  Theatres,  Managers  and  Operators 
will  alike  find  a  vast  amount  of  useful  infor- 
mation in  this  book.  It  is  the  only  book  of 
its  kind  that  has  ever  been  published.  Price 
:i  6.     Postage  8d,  extra. 

The  Bioscope  Electricians'  Handbook,  In 
J.  W.  Barber.  A.M.I.E.E.  Just  the  right  size 
for  the  w. listen. n  pocket.  Contains  much  in- 
formation that  is  unobtainable  elsewhere. 
The  wiring  diagrams  alone  are  worth  more 
than  the  price  of  the  book.  Price  1  -.  Post- 
age Id,  extra. 


Photographic  Optics  and  Colour  Photo- 
graphy.- By  G.  Lindsay  Johnson.  This  is 
the  best  book  that  has  ever  been  written  on 
the  subject  and  includes  fourteen  full  page 
plates  (five  of  hem  in  colour)  and  one 
hundred  and  seventy  illustrations  in  the  text. 
Price  7s.  lid.     Postage  id.  extra. 

Handbook  of  Kinematography.  b>   Culm   N 

Bennett.  F.C.S.  -A  complete  treatise  on  the 
history,  theorj  and  practice  of  Motion  Kine- 
matography, 300  pages.  -20(1  illustrations. 
Price  .">  Postage  'id.  extra. 

Photography  in  Colours.     Also  bj  G.  Liudsa) 

Johnson.  This  book  contains  a  most 
interesting  chapter  on  Kinematography  in 
Colours,     Price  8s.  6d.     Postage  3d.  extra. 


Cinematographists'  Licensing  Law,  by  Geo. 
Johnson. -The  book  is  indespensible  to  Pro- 
prietors of  Picture  Theatres.  Price  2  ti 
Postage  IJd.  extra. 

Picture  Plays  and  How  to  Write  Them,  b\ 
E.  J.  Muddle. — Indispensible  to  all  who 
aspire  to  make  money  by  writing  plots  for 
cinematograph  films.     Price  2  9,  Post  Free. 

The  Law  of  Copyright  in  Relation  to  Cine- 
matography. By  W.  Carlyle  Croasdell, 
Barrister-at-Law  The  provisions  of  the 
new  Copyright  Bill  are  fully  discussed. 
Price  lid.     Post  free  6td. 

Moving  Pictures,  How  they  are  Made  and 
Worked,  by  Frederick  A.  Talbot. — A  de- 
cidedly useful  book,  written  in  non-technical 
language.  Contains  many  illustrations. 
Price  6  -.     Postage  (id.  extra. 


THE   CINEMATOGRAPH   PRESS.    16,   CECIL    COURT.   CHARING   CROSS   ROAD,   LONDON.   W. 


February    1912. 


THE    CINEMA. 


'27 


MR.  Hand  has  now    reopened    the   Central    Palace.  North 
Shields. 
Mr.  John  Walmsley,  J.P.,  recently  opened  a  Picture 
Theatre,  sealing  over  800  people,  at  Featherstone. 

Mr  W.  Garnell  is  manager  of  the  Silverhill  Cinema,  the  latest 
picture  theatre  to  be  opened  in  Hastings. 

We  are  sorry  to  hear  that  Mr.  Landmann,  of  the  Nordisk  Films 
Co.,  is  kept  away  in  Germany  through  illness. 

Mr.  Frank  Macnaughton  has  opened  the  Southampton  Coliseum 
The  hall  will  seat  1,000  persons. 

Mr  Barkers  splendid  'Durbar''  film  was  exhibited  before  the 
King  and  Queen  in  India. 

Mr.  Arthur  Spicer  is  the  manager  of  the  YVinton  Hall,  Bourne- 
mouth Picture  Theatre  which  was  recently  opened. 

The  Edinburgh  Coliseum  Picture  Theatre,  West  Fountainbridge, 
was  formally  opened  by  Sir  Robert  Cranston  recently.  The 
building  will  seat  1.550  persons. 

Mr.  Henry  de  Sola,  manager  of  Shepherd's  Bush  Cinematograph 
Theatre,  has  been  presented  bv  the  staff  with  a  handsome  silver- 
mounted  umbrella. 

Mr.  J.  Hickling  lias  left  the  Grand  Central  Theatres,  Ltd..  to 
managetheKingsland  Imperial  Theatre  Company's  Hall  at  Dalston. 


Councillor  Cheetham,  of  Rhyl,  is  nothing  if  not  enterprising. 
He  publishes  an  eight-page  weekly  magazine,  telling  the  story  of 
the  films  shown  at  his  picture  theatre.      It  is  distributed  free. 

Mr  H.  A.  Spoor,  of  the  Kssanay  Film  Manufacturing  Co.,  is 
expected  to  arrive  in  London  about  February  3rd,  after  a  com- 
bined pleasure  and  business  trip  to  America. 

Mr  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Boam,  of  the  Ealing  Cinematograph 
Theatre,  have  been  presented  with  a  handsome  silver  clock  and 
brass  inkstand  by  the  staff  of  the  Theatre. 

The  Exmouth  Public  Hall  staff  have  presented  the  Manager. 
Mr.  Horace  Mitchell,  with  a  case  of  pipes  and  a  tobacco  pouch  as 
a  birthday  present. 

Mr.  Charles  Wright,  at  his  picture  show  in  the  Shoreditch  Public 
Baths,  recently  entertained  3,000  Hoxton  children,  giving  them  a 
capital  tea  first. 

Mr.  Arthur  Andrews  was  recently  presented  with  a  handsome 
Mask  by  the  staff  of  the  Victoria  Hall,  Southsea,  whilst  Mr.  Levey, 
of  the  Shaftesbury  Hall,  presented  Mr.  Andrews  with  a  pair  of 
Satsuma  vases. 

On  resigning  the  position  oi  Manager  of  the  Paragon  Theatre, 
Calton,  Glasgow  .  Mr.  Harry  Bruce  was  the  recipient  of  a  silver- 
mounted  dressing  case  and  Mrs.  Bruce  a  silver-mounted  hand  bag, 
containing  a  purse  of  money,  from  the  staff. 

Mr.  E.  C.  Reed,  chief  publicity  writer  to  the  Westinghotise 
Companies  Publishing  Department,  has  been  appointed  sales 
manager  to  Messrs.  Miles  Sykes  &  Sons,  of  Calder  Works, 
Sowerby  Bridge 

The  Mayor  of  Hackney,  in  opening  the  Kingsland  Imperial 
Picture  Palace  recently,  testified  to  the  power  of  the  cinematograph 
as  an  educational  medium,  as  well  as  a  means  of  entertainment. 
The  Kingsland  Picture  Palace  has  accommodation  for  1,000  people. 


The 

Camera  Man's 

Chances 

IN    FEBRUARY. 

The  Royal  Return.  -The  return  of  the  King  and  Queen  from 
India  and  their  reception  on  landing  by  the  civic  authorities  of 
Portsmouth  will  be  one  of  the  most  important  topical  events  of  the 
month  and  will  complete  the  marvellously  effective  cinemato- 
graph chronicle  of  the  Royal  journey.  There  should  also  be 
chances  of  obtaining  some  good  pictures  in  London  unless  the  death 
of  the  Duke  of  Fife  should  necessitate  an  alteration  of   programme. 

-»« 

Following  closely  upon  the  Royal  arrival,  will  be  the  important 
ceremonial  Thanksgiving  Service  in  St.  Paul's  Cathedral,  where  a 
notable  gathering  of  Church  and  State  dignitaries  will   be  present. 

Orangemen  and  Trouble.  The  Lister  meeting  ought  to  prove 
capable  of  good  films,  but  the  assignment  will  be  a  somewhat 
perilous  one  if  all  that  is  threatened  actually  takes  place.  Besides 
topical  and  transient  interest  the  films  will  later  on  be  capable  of 
possible  political  application. 

The  Opening  of  Parliament  — Again  wehaveaKoyal  Pageant. 
The  opening  of  Parliament  by  the  King  and  the  ever-present  chance 
of  disturbance  by  Suffragists,  lor  it  is  rumoured  that  the  occasion 
is  g"ing  to  be  made  a  pretext  for  more  'protests,'  and  as  the 
violence  of  these  demonstrations  is  considerably  on  the  increase, 
some  very  amusing  struggles  between  the  forces  of  the  law  and 
peccant   temales  may  be  recorded. 

The  Riviera  and  the  South  of  France.  Nice  and  Cannes 
are  this  month  given  over  to  the  spirit  of  Carnival  and  battles  of 
flowers,  besides  which  a  number  of  important  sporting  events  of 
International  interest  are  scheduled.  There  is  a  Tir  au  Pigeon 
which  usually  attracts  many  well-known  English  sportsmen,  and 
later  on  the  International  Polo  Cup  at  Cannes. 


The  Dog-lovers  Films.  -February  is  phenomenal  tor  the 
important  events  in  the  canine  world.  The  first  is  Cruft's  Dog 
Show  at  Islington,  and  when  one  considers  the  enormous  number 
of  canine  enthusiasts  in  the  North  of  England,  one  can  be  certain 
of  a  good  reception  for  views  of  this  notable  event.  The  Waterloo 
Chip  is  the  second  event,  and  is  sure  to  arouse  much  enthusiasm  in 
sporting  circles,  besides  having  an  ever-present  interest  for  the 
public. 

Tossing  the  Pancake. — On  Shrove  Tuesday  we  have  several 
old  ceremoives  of  which  probably  the  distribution  of  Maundy 
Monev  and  the  mediaeval  survival  of  Tossing  the  Pancake  at 
Westminster  School,  are  the  most  important.  The  Pancake  Greese 
as  it  is  called  is  one  of  the  oldest  public  school  customs  in  England, 
and  takes  place  under  the  patronage  of  the  Dean  of  Westminser, 
who  has  to  reward  the  victor  in  the  struggle,  with  a  guinea. 

^# 

Duke  of  Fife  s  Funeral.  -The  Funeral  ceremonies  of  the  late 
Duke  of  Fife  will  doubtless  provide  films  of  unusual,  though 
mournful,  interest;  and  it  is  probable  that  the  arrival  of  the 
remains  on  board  a  British  warship  and  the  Memorial  Service  in 
the  Royal  Chapel  will  give  opportunities  for  securing  a  film  that 
might  run  concurrently  with  those  showing  the  illfated  liner  Delhi, 
whose  stranding  was  the  first  incident  of  the  tragic  voyage. 

MEETING  OF  THE  EXHIBITORS'  ASSOCIATION. 
A  meeting  was  called  by  Mr.  F.  Ogden  Smith,  at  the  Holborn 
Restaurant  last  week,  with  the  object  of  forming  a  Cinematograph 
Exhibitors'  Association.  Mr.  Barker  was  elecled  chairman  and 
the  meeting  opened  with  a  brief  discussion  of  the  aims  of  the 
proposed  Association.  The  point  particularly  discussed  was 
whether  the  Association  should  be  limited  to  showmen,  or  should 
include  film  hirers  and  manufacturers.  Mr.  Forsyth,  who  is 
figuring  prominently  in  the  non-flam  prosecution,  suggested  thai 
the}'  needed  a  defence  league  of  their  own,  run  entirely  in  the 
interests  of  showmen.  Eventually  it  was  put  to  the  vote  that  an 
Association  of  Exhibitors  should  be  formed  and  a  committee 
appointed  to  consider  the  advisability  of  admitting  other  branches 
oi  the  trade.  A  pr  ivisional  committee,  consisting  of  Messrs.  L. 
Schlentheim,  \.  J.  Oale,  E.  M.  Barker.  R.  T.  Jupp.  P.  M.  Beck, 
Colin  Bishop  and  Mr.  Mason,  was  formed,  the  subscription  settled 
at  f\  is.  per  hall,  and  Mr.  J.  E.  Muddle  was  elected  secretary, 
pro  tern. 


2N 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


-YOU     SAVE     MONEY- 


ON     PICTURE     THEATRE     EQUIPMENT 

and    Reduction  in    Electricity   Accounts 

Bl     I     INSULTING 

Mr.   JAMES   W.   BARBER,    A.M.IE.E., 

Independent  Consulting  Electrical  and  Cinematograph   Engineer 

(Auth i      Mm    B pi    Elect)  ician's  I  landbook," 

•■  Alternating   Currents,"  etc.,  etc.) 

Schemes  prepat  d  and  advki  given  on  all  Pictun  Fheatrt  Equipment. 

Inspet  tionsand Insuran  trical  I  'him  against  Hmtkdtttrn, «  U  . 

A !Ess     ARUYLE    CHAMBERS, 

106,     CHARINti     CROSS    ROAD,     LONDON.     W.C. 


Every  operator  should  possess  a  copy  of  "The  Bioscope  Elec- 
trician's Handbook."  "The  Operator's  ViuU  \h,iim"  (vide  Press), 
1-  post  free  from  the  above  Al-u  "  Alternating  Currents -Their 
Nature  and  Their  Uses."  A  Practical  Manual  for  tin  Bioscope 
Operator,  6^d.  post  free.  Tel.  12598  Central. 


•  * 


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ARE 

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RENTED    TO 

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and  the  more  it  complies  with  the 
demand  of  the  people  for  sensational 
subjects,  the  greater  will  be  it's  success. 
\V<  .in  handling  .1  number  of  these 
"  Winning  Exclusives  '  and  will  be  glad 
of  the  opportunity  to  semi  full  particulars. 
Please  remember  that  all  our  films  are 
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TELEPHONE    9421     CITY. 


February,    1912. 


THE    CINEMA. 


29 


TRIUMPH   OF  THE  TOPICAL  FILM. 


HOW   THE    DURBAR    PICTURES   CAME   TO    HAND. 


N 


O  recent  event — the  Coronation  not  excepted — 
has  aroused  such  general  interest  in  the  cinema- 
tograph world  as  the  Delhi  Durbar,  and  it  is 
hard  to  imagine  anything  that  could  prove  a 


greater  draw  to  the  public. 

Everything   was   in    the   operator' 


favour  ;    splend 


light,  good  points  of  view,  a  magnificent  pageant  to 
register,  and,  as  an  extra  boon  -the  public  indescrelions 
of  a  gentleman  of  colour,  who,  it  has  been  recently 
decided  —is  a  ruling  prince  ! 

"Oh  you     Gaekwar  !  " 

As  our  American  cousins  would  put  it,  "  It's  an  ill 
wind  that  blows  nobody  any  good."  and  it  is  doubtful  if 
a  special  film  of  a  member  of  the  Cabinet  dancing  the 
cachuca  in  his  Coronation  robes  would  have  evoked  such 
enthusiastic  reprobation  on  the  part  of  the  "reat  British 
public. 

Have  you  seen    the  Gaekwar  bob? 

This  was  the  universal  query,  and  the  public  came  in 
droyes  and  put  down  its  money  to  see  the  Delhi  Durbar 
films.  The  influence  was  splendid.  Many  people  who 
had  never  entered  a  cinema  hall  before,  made  up  their 
minds  and  took  the  plunge — just  to  see  Baroda  bob  ! 
And  having  broken  the  ice, they  probably  got  the  cinema 
habit  and  will  become  good  patrons  of  the  evanescent 
him. 

More  haste — less  speed. 

In  spite  of  the  enormous  expenditure  of  energy  and 
money,  and  the  great  enterprise  shown  by  many  firms  in 
hustling  the  films  of  the  Durbar  right  back  to  London 
before  the  peopD  of  Delhi  had  had  time  to  gossip — the 
first   real   news   and    the   first    pictures  arrived  together  ! 


ll  seems  rather  a  pitj  that  more  care  was  not  taken  over 
some  of  the  production  work'.  In  the  hurry  and  rush. 
coincident  with  the  effort  to  be  right  on  the  spot  with 
the  goods,  at  tlie  earliest  possible  moment,  it  is  inevitable 
that  the  pictures  should  suffer. 

As  it  is,  nothing  could  demonstrate  m  jre  effectually 
the  enterprise  and  energy  of  the  trade,  than  the  gratifi- 
cation of  public  interest  in  a  epoch  making  event,  within 
the  shortest  possible  lime. 

Buried   in  the  Sand. 

Mr.  Charles  Urban,  who  returned  to  London,  a  few 
days  ago,  brought  with  him  <>_l. o  ><>  feet  of  Kinemacolor 
films  of  the  Durbar. 

•'  We  were  able  to  take  a  partli  uhirly  good  picture  of 
the  Gaekwar's  discourteous  behaviour,  as  after  bowing 
stiffly  to  the  King  he  wheeled  about  and  marched  away, 
passing  our  machine  as  he  went."  said  Mr.  Urban  lo  an 
interviewer.  "The  picture  is  so  clear  that  I  do  not 
intend  to  exhibit  it." 

Mr.  Urban  was  so  scared  that  he  might  lose  all  his 
pictures  by  fire  that  he  adopted  a  novel  method  of  pre- 
serving them.  "  I  had  a  larj^e  hole  dug  inside  our  tent, 
and  a  big  chest  lowered  down,  and  in  this  1  deposited  all 
my  films  in  tin  boxes.  When  the  chest  was  shut  I  had 
it  covered  up  by  a  couple  of  feet  of  sand,  and  this  con- 
stituted a  fireproof  room.  After  each  scene  was  taken 
the  carpet  inside  my  tent  was  removed,  the  sand 
shovelled  away,  and  the  film  put  in  the  chest." 

•■  We  found  the  light  extraordinarily  good  ;  it  was 
similar  to  the  brightest  light  that  we  get  on  a  clear  day 
in  September  in  England.  Tin's  enabled  us  to  take  some 
wonderful  pictures.  For  instance,  we  took  the  great 
cavalry  charge  at  an  extraordinary  rate — fifty-five 
pictures  through  a  coloured  screen  per  second." 


QORRESPONDENICE 

' »gM        ■      JllllBJJUi 


LETTERS    FROM     READERS    ON     TOPICS    OF     INTEREST     WILL    ALWAYS     BE     WELCOMED, 

But  all  Correspondence  submitted  or  publication  in  The  Cinema  hum  bi  accompanied  bj  ihe  lull  name  and  address  of  the  writer,  nut  necessarily  for 
publication,  but  as  evidence  of  good  f*ith.  No  notice  will  be  taken  of  anonymous  communications.  I  etters,  which  must  In- written  upon  one  sid< 
of  the  paper  only,  should  be  brief  and  10  the  point,  and  should  reach  the  Editor  not  later  than  the  20th  oi  the  m. .nth.  All  communications  should  be 
addressed  to  the  Editor.   Thf  Cinema,  21,  North   Audlev  Street.  Oxford  Street.  W. 


APPROPRIATE    MUSIC. 

To  the  Editor  of  The  Cinema. 

Sir, — Is  it  not  possible  that  the  film  manufacturers  in  sending 
out  their  films  should  at  the  same  time  send  with  it  a  set  of  musical 
directions  as  to  '  time  '  and  variety  of  music  appropiiate  ? 

I  find  nothing  more  irritating  than  to  have  to  listen  to  variations 
on  "  Ginger,  you're  balmy,"  when  the  operator  is  show  ing  a  serious 
dramatic  film.  Readily  do  1  acknowledge  that  first-class  music  is 
not  expected,  or  likel;  to  be  appreciated  by  the  majority  ol  patrons 
of  the  picture  theatre,  but  surely  it  is  a  mistake  to  promote  an 
efficient  typist  to  that  more  complicated  instrument,  the  piano,  md 
expect  her  to  gratify  the  ear  of  the  audience. 

I  have  entered  picture  palaces  upon  which  enormous  sums  of 
money  have  been  spent  upon  the  comfort  of  the  audience,  and 
found  my  enjoyment  of  the  display  completely  ruined  by  the  dread- 


ful cacophony  of  the  accompanist.     London  is  a  particular  offender 

in  this  respect  The  more  musical  North  Countrymen  would  not 
stand  it  lor  a  minute,  and  surely  if  little  provincial  halls  can  provide 
fairly  good  and  apppopriate  music,  the  Londoner  could  afford  to 
follow  suit  '' 

Yours,  etc.. 

The  Primrose  Club.  VALENTINE   PULLIN. 


"The   Picture    Palace  is  a   verv    greal    source   of    pleasure  and 
amusement,  and  it  is  also  one  ol  the  verj   best  places  of  instruction. 

To  the  child  it  is  better  than  many  lesson-books.  These  shows 
will  go  a  long  way  to  create  a  more  temperate  state  of  society,  and 
the  money  which  is  spent  in  them  is  better  spent  there  than  in  the 
public-house."  —Sir  Robert  Cranston,  at  Edinburgh, 


M 


THE   CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


LONDON  4*  PROVINCIAL  THEATRES  dc  SITES 
T0BE-LET0R.-S0LD. 


Applicants  requiring  further  particulars  ami  orders  to  view  any  of  the  properties  mentioned  in  the  subjoined  list  For    Scale    of  Charges   for    Advertisements 

are  requested  to  quote  the  folio  number  attached,  and  be  precise  in  the  information  they  seek.     Applicants  not  under  this  Heading,  apply  to  The  Manager, 

finding  their  requirements  in   this  list,  are  invited  to  forward  a  description  of  the  investment  they  are  seeking,  THE  CINEMA  NEWS  &  PROPERTY  GAZETTE, 

and  particulars  of  anything  suitable  will  be  forwarded  from  time  to  time  without  charge  by  the  respective  agents.  LTD.,    21,     NORTH     AUDLEY     STREET,    W. 


selection  oh   properties  from  the  registers  oh 

Messrs.  Harris  &  Gili.ow,  Cinematograph  Property  Experts 

151a,  Oxforh  Street,  Lonhos,  \Y. 


LONDON    THEATRES. 


LONDON.  W. — A  handsome  building,  70-ft.  frontage,  with  a  depth  of  170-ft. 
Lately  used  as  a  Skating  Rink,  built  Xmas,  1908.  Music  and  Dancing  Licenses 
in  order.  Rent  £300  per  annum  on  lease,  or  price  £2,500  for  a  lease  of  99  years, 
at  a  ground  rent  of  £76  per  annum.     Fo.  317a 


LONDON.  E.— Frontage  20-ft..  depth  80-ft.  Hold  about  300.  Established 
Xmas,  1910.  A  going  concern  with  a  lease  of  10  years,  at  the  low  inclusive  rent 
of  £60  per  annum.     Price  inclusive  £425.     Fo.  518a 

LONDON.  W. — A  very  good  Theatre  in  the  main  road  of  a  crowded  district, 
opened  February,  igoy.^an'd  making  a  net  profit  of  about  £500  per  annum.  Price 
£1,000  inclusive,  lease  21  years.     Fo.  527b 

LONDON.  NORTH.— A  handsome  Theatre,  opened  about  a  year  ago  and 
making  a  net  profit  of  about  £2,500  per  annum.  Seating  capacity  about  900. 
["he  takings  average  about  £100  per  week.  £3,000  down,  balance  by  instalments, 
will  purchase  freehold.     Fo,  728b 

LONDON,  NORTH.— A  pretty  little  Theatre  with  a  frontage  of  36-ft.  and  a 
depth  of  50-ft.,  with  a  holding  capacity  of  250.  Established  about  18  months. 
Price  £390  inclusive.     Lease  3,  7,  14  or  21  years.     Fo.  536b 


LONDON.  S.W.— A  smart  little  Theatre  seating  about  300.  Price  inclusive 
of  everything  £600.     Fo.  751b __ 

LONDON,  N.— A  snug  little  Theatre  built  about  a  year  ago  at  a  cost  of  about 
£3,500.  Lease  80  years.  Ground  Rent  £85  per  annum.  Hold  about  650.  Price 
including  everything,  £2,000,  £1,000  of  which  can  remain.     Fo.  684V 

"  LONDON  SUBURB,  N.W.— Public  Hall  built  about  4$  years  ago,  31-ft.  6-in. 
frontage,  110-ft.  deep,  holding  about  650.  Price  freehold,  inclusive  of  all  fixtures 
and   fittings.  £3.400  (a  part  might  remain).     First  floor  let  off  at  £100  per  annum. 

Fo.  653b 

LONDON,  S.E.— A  good  Theatre,  at  present  seating  about  360  and  making  a 
net  profit  of  about  £300  per  annum,  which  can  be  considerably  increased.  Estab- 
lished nearly  two~years.  Adjacent  land  has  been  acquired  with  the  object  of 
enlarging  the  Hall  to  seat  over  1,000.     Rent  £200  per  annum,  premium  £500. 

Fo.  664b 

LONDON  SUBURB,  S.W.— One  of  the  finest  Halls,  accommodating  1,250, 
with  Music,  Dancing,  Cinematograph  and  Stage  Play  Licenses.  No  opposition. 
Would  be  let  (including  major  and  minor  halls,  the  latter  of  which  could  easily 
be  let  off  for  dances,  meetings.  &c,  at  £150  per  annum)  at  £295  per  annum  ;  or 
Hall  and  Five  Shops  and  Offices  (all  let),  the  whole  producing  over  £500  per 
annum,  would  be  sold  for  £5,950,  £5,300  of  which  could  remain  on  mortgage  at 
5  per  cent.,  leaving  only  £650  cash  to  provide.  Premises  cost  about  £9,000  to 
build.    The  whole  woufd  be  let  for  £450  per  annum.    Fo.  763)- 

LONDON,  S.E.— Cinema  Theatre  seating  400.  Established  over  two  years. 
Books  are  kept  and  open  to  inspection.  Average  takings  £21  per  week.  Rent 
£150  per  annum.     Lease  five  years.     Price  £350.     Well  fitted.     Fo.  586V 

LONDON,  N.— Theatre  seating  450,  with  standing  room  for  200  in  gallery. 
Lease  80  years.  Price  £1,000  cash,  and  £1,000  on  mortgage.  Ground  Rent  £85. 
The  Theatre  cost  £3,500  to  build.     Fo.  584y         

LONDON,  N.— Well-built  Hall  seating  430,  fully  equipped  and  licensed. 
Rent  £200  per  annum.  Price  £1,000,  including  generating  plant.  Lease  five 
years.     Takings  average  £2,000  per  annum.     Fo.  884b 

LONDON,  N.— Fine  Music  Hall  seating  1,400,  and  standing  room.  The  sum 
of  £3,000,  with  balance  by  instalments,  will  purchase  the  freehold  and  everything 
as  it  stands  A  remarkable  opportunity  to  obtain  possession  and  a  profitable 
undertaking  for  a  small  figure.     Portion  let  oft  at  £70  per  annum.     Fo.  688b 

LONDON.  W.— One  of  the  oldest  established  Theatres  in  the  West  End, 
making  a  nett  profit  of  over  £1,000  per  annum.  Vary  high  class.  Capacity 
about  200.     Price  including  everything,  £1,500, 


LONDON,  S.W. — A  good  Theatre  erected  at  great  expense,  holding  about  600, 
and  making  a  nett  profit  of  over  £1,200  per  annum.  It  is  fitted  with  everything 
of  the  best  and  capable  of  making  much  larger  profits.  Ground  Rent  £240  pet- 
annum.  Price  inclusive  £4,500.  half  of  which  can  probably  be  allowed  to  remain 
on  mortgage. 

LONDON.  W.— Coliseum,  holding  about  700.  Established  June,  1910.  Net 
profits  £500  per  annum.  Price  £2,000  inclusive.  Everything  of  the  latest  and 
best.     Rent  £300.     Long  lease.     Freehold  can  be  bought.     Fo.  690b 

LONDON,  W  — Cinema  Palace,  holding  capacity  400  Average  takings  £54  per 
week.  Expenses  about  £30.  Rent  £200,  Price  £2,000  (which  was  the  cost  of 
the  building  alonel,  includes  all  fixtures  and  fittings.  2  pianos,  organ. 
Gaumont  machines,  etc.     A  bargain.     Fo.  89iy. 

LONDON,  WEST-END.— One  of  the  highest-class  small  Theatres  in  one  of  the 
best  main  streets  in  the  West  end  of  London'  Although  only  holding  about  200, 
the  net  profit  is  over  £1,000  per  annum.  Price  for  the  whole  place  as  a  going 
concern,  £1,250.     A  bargain.     Fo.  992y. 

LONDON,  S.W.— A  newly-built  Theatre,  costing  over  £5,000.  Capacity  nearly 
600.  Takings  last  month,  £220.  £2,000  cash  and  balance  on  mortgage  includes 
going  concern  and  everything  of  the  best.  Long  lease.  Ground  rent  £250  per 
annum.     Fo.  793)'. 


LONDON    SITES. 


LONDON,  W. — A  very  important  site  in  a  main  West  End  shopping  street, 
suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  where,  without  doubt,  a 
very  large  and  profitable  business  could  be  done.  Lease  65  years.  Ground  .vent 
£575  per  annum.    Premium  £3,000.    Really  a  most  unusual  opportunity.  Fo.  557b 

LONDON,  W. — Crowded  West  End  thoroughfare,  a  Site  capable  of  accom- 
modating a  very  large  Cinematograph  Theatre  to  seat  about  2,000,  together  with 
room  for  building  about  ten  Shops  and  an  Upper  Part  comprising  Showrooms 
and  Offices.  It  is  computed  that  £8,000  per  annum  net  profit  will  be  made  from 
the  rentals  to  be  derived  from  the  building,  and  £8,000  net  profit  from  the 
Cinematograph  Theatre.     The  Ground  Rent  is  £5,000  per  annum.     Fo.  6ny 


LONDON,  W. — Main  thoroughfare  in  the  midst  of  Theatre  Land.  A  Cine- 
matograph Theatre  capable  of  seating  about  1,500  can  be  built  together  with  shop 
property,  offices,  etc.  A  net  profit  of  £12,000  per  annum  should  easily  be 
obtained.  Ground  Rent  £4,500  per  annum.  Estimated  cost  ot  building  £45,000. 
Fo.  762b 

LONDON,  W. — A  Building  Site  about  40-ft.  by  107-ft.  at  present  comprising 
two  shops  and  upper  parts  in  about  the  only  crowded  populous  neighbourhood 
in  London  where  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  does  not  at  present  exist.  It  would 
cost  about  £1,500  to  adapt  the  present  property  or  about  £3,000  to  build  a  new- 
Theatre.  Ground  Rent  £300  per  annum.  No  premium.  Really  an  unusual 
opportunity.     Fo.  757b 

LONDON,  W. — In  what  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  very  finest  positions  for  a 
Cinematograph  Theatre.  A  Building  Site,  90-ft.  by  100-ft.,  with  an  entrance  from 
the  main  road,  25-ft.  by  70-ft.,  which  would  form  a  Lounge  and  Tea  Room.  All 
necessary  exits  can  be  arranged,  and  a  net  profit  of  about  £7,000  a  year  should 
easily  be  made  from  the  Theatre.  Ground  Rent  £600  per  annum.  Premium 
£7.500,  £3,000  of  which  can  be  payable  on  completion,  and  £4,500  in  instalments 
spread  over  a  period  of  seven  years.     Fo.  657b 

ISLINGTON. — Near  the  "Angel"  and  on  the  same  side,  having  a  frontage 
of  about  40-ft.  and  a  depth  of  130-ft.,  offering  a  grand  opportunity  for  the  erection 
of  a  handsome  Theatre  in  which  a  very  large  and  remunerative  business  could 
be  done.  Part  freehold  and  part  leasehold  for  70  years,  the  Ground  Rent  of 
which  is  £200  per  annum.     Price  £7,000.     Fo.  613a 

CAMDF^N  TOWN. — Main  street,  a  good  Site  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a 
Theatre  can  be  obtained  in  one  of  the  best  positions,  on  a  building  lease  for  99 
years  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £100  per  annum.     Premium  £400.     Fo.  713b 

STREATHAM—  Main  road,  very  fine  Site  with  a  frontage  of  162-ft.  and 
a  return  frontage  of  of  232-ft.  Premises  are  already  built  upon  the  property  and 
are  let  to  one  of  the  chief  Banks  at  £250  per  annum,  who  can  be  retained.  A 
Cinematograph  Theatre  could  be  arranged  on  the  other  portion  of  the  land,  and 
being  in  such  a  populous  neighbourhood,  a  very  large  business  can  be  done. 
Will  he  let  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £400  per  annum  or  Freehold  £10,000.     Fo.  505a 


February,    1912. 


THE    CINEMA. 


SI 


CAMDEN  TOWN.— An  excellent  Building  Site  with  about  40-ft.  frontage  can 
lie  had  in  the  High  Street,  on  lease  for  90  years,  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £130  per 
annum.     Premium  £1,200.     Fo.  Si3y 


HACKNEY— In  a  very  fine  position  at  the  junction  of  two  main  streets,  an 
1  xcellent  Site  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  over  1,000.  Ground  Rent 
£350  per  annum,  lease  99  years.     Fo.  814a 

KING'S  CROSS.  — In  the  main  road,  a  good  Situ  with  a  frontage  of  32-ft. 
widening  to  70-ft..  with  a  depth  of  127-ft.     Ground  Rent  £'380  per  annum. 

Fo.  614) 

STRATFORD,  High  Street.— An  excellent  Site  in  this  populous  neighbour- 
hood, capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  1,500.  Lease  expires  1963.  Ground 
Kent  £70  per  annum.     Price  £2,000.     Fo.  519b 

BOROUGH  HIGH  STREET— A  Freehold  Site,  capable  of  erecting  a 
Theatre  to  seat  about  1,000.  Frontage  60-ft.,  depth  110-ft.  Price  £3,250.  Extra 
land  at  the  side  can  be  added  totaling  8,000  square  feet.     Fo.  721b 

HAMPSTEAD,  High  Street.— A  Site,  50-ft-  by  50-ft.  to  be  let,  in  the  main 
street.     Ground  Rent  £150  per  annum.     Fo.  625b 

CLAPHAM  JUNCTION.— In  the  main  street.  Fine  Site,  50-ft.  by  100-ft. 
Price  Freehold  £3,000,  might  be  let  on  a  building  lease.     Fo.  825V 

CLAPHAM,  High  Street. — A  noble  corner  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre  or 
Music  Hall,  being  over  one  acre  in  extent.  Buildings  are  now  erected  on  it, 
portion  of  which  could  be  utilised  or  let  oft.  Ground  Rent  £1,000.  Lease  99 
years.     The  freehold  will  be  sold.     Fo.  530b 

BRIXTON. — 111  the  best  position.  An  exceedingly  good  Site,  suitable  for  a 
Theatre  seating  about  1,500.     Ground  Rent  £450  per  annum.     Lease  60  years. 

Fo.  731b 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  N. — A  fine  property  suitable  for  Theatre,  capable  of 
seating  about  1,000,  with  room  to  build  two  shops  in  addition.  Ground  Rent 
£150.     Lease  99  years.     Fo.  645b 

EUSTON  ROAD.— In  the  best  position,  fine  property  capable  of  erecting  a 
Theatre  with  alterations  only,  existing  property  being  easily  adapted.  A  Theatre 
can  be  arranged  capable  of  seating  about  750.     Rent  £450  per  annum.     Fo.  546b 

HOLLOWAY  ROAD. — In  the  very  best  position,  a  fine  Corner  Site,  30-ft.  by 
93-ft.,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  seating  about  650.  A  very  large 
business  can  be  done  in  this  important  position.     Rent  £600.     Fo.  848b 

PRAED  STREET. — Fine  Site  for  a  Theatre  capable  of  seating  about  600. 
Rent  £450.     Lease  46  years.     Fo.  448y 

BRENTFORD,  High  Road.— A  fine  Site,  suitable  fora  Theatre,  frontage  80-ft. 
depth  250-ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,500.     Fo.  650b 

ACTON.— In  the  main  street,  a  very  excellent  Site,  frontage  42-ft.  6-in..  depth 
100-ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000.     Fo.  650b 

LONDON,  N.W.— In  a  very  fine  position  for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  A 
Site  capable  of  a  building  to  seat  800  to  1,000,  and  having  two  very  excellent 
frontages  to  the  most  important  roads  in  the  district.  Ground  Rent  £250. 
Premium  £1,600.  A  higher  Ground  Rent  without  a  premium  might  be  arranged. 
Fo.  563b 

WESTMINSTER.—  In  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Houses  of  Parliament.  A 
grand  Site  next  door  to  important  Banking  premises,  and  having  a  frontage  of 
1 40-ft.,  comprising  four  separate  properties  which  can  be  adapted  for  the  purpose 
of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre,  or  a  new  building  could  be  erected.  This  being 
situated  in  a  very  thickly  populated  district  offers  an  unusually  good  opportunity 
for  the  erection  of  a  good  going  concern.     Fo.  665b 

LONDON  N.— Site  about  74-ft.  by85-ft.it!  populous  district.  Price  for  the 
freehold,  £2,000,  or  might  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  568b 


NOTTING  HILL  GATE.— Site  35-ft.  by  75-ft.  Lease  7,  14  or  21  vears. 
Ground  Rent  £350.     Close  to  Notting  Hill  Gate  Station.     Fo.  576V 

BROMLEY.— Site  in  an  excellent  position,  15-ft.  3-in.  by  106-ft.  Price  £2,500. 
Fo.  676b 

WANDSWORTH.— Excellent  Building   Site   in   a   very  fine  position.     The 
freehold  can  be  obtained  for  £4,500,  the  major  part  of  which  can  remain. 
F'o.  879b 

SOUTH  NORWOOD.— Workshop,  25-ft.  by  100-ft.,  suitable  for  conversion 
into  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  56  years.  Ground  Rent  £4  10s.  Low 
price.     Would  be  let  for  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  678b. 

TOTTENHAM.— Site  25-ft.  6-in.  by  131-ft.  Lease  93  years.  Price  £1,650. 
A  very  fineaosition.     Fo.  6775* 

WEST  HAM.— Site  having  an  area  of  about  10,100  sq.ft.  Lease  80  years. 
Ground  Rent  £65  per  annum.  Price,  freehold.  £1.000.  Part  let  off  for  .f  40  per 
annum.     Fo.  777b 

BRENTFORD.— Site  t8-ft.  by  259-ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,500.     Fo.  683y 

MORTLAKE. — Freehold  Site  in  a  very  good  position  where  a  large  business 
could  be  done.     Price  £5,500.     Fo.  5S2}' 

SHEPHERDS  BUSH.— Site  34-ft.  by  75-ft.  Lease  about  18  years.  Rent 
£180.     Price  £1,500.     Fo.  88oy 

PLAISTOW.— Site  50  yards  from  station,  36-ft.  by  90-ft.  Good  position  for 
a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  99  years.  Ground  Rent  £75  per  annum,  or 
price,  freehold,  £1,500,  part  on  mortgage.     Fo.  780b 


PADDINGTON. — A  very  fine  Site  of  i,6oo-ft.  At  present  occupied  by  an 
excellent  building  which  could  easily  be  converted.  Will  be  let  at  a  Groninl 
Rent  of  £700  a  year  with  a  premium,  or  the  freehold  would  be  sold.     Fo.  779}- 

BOW.  h.. — In  the  main  road,  trams  pass  the  door.  A  very  good  Site  in  the 
busiest  spot,  42-ft.  frontage  by  112-ft.  6-in.  deep.  Price,  freehold,  £600.  A 
successful  Theatre  could  be  built  for  about  £'2,000,  and  a  mortgage  could  be 
arranged  for  £1,500.  There  is  only  one  other  small  Theatre  in  the  neighbourhood, 
thus  offering  an  excellent  opportunity.     Fo.  673b 

ACTON. — A  fine  Site,  50-ft.  by  120-ft..  in  a  grand  position,  surrounded  by 
works  and  factories  and  in  midst  of  a  densely  populated  district.  Ground  Rent 
only  £150  per  annum.     No  premium. 


HOME  COUNTIES. 


BEDFORDSHIRE.— A  well-built  property,  heretofore  used  as  a  Rink,  suitable 
for  conversion  to  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  with  small  expense.  Large  seating 
capacity.  Population  50,000.  Rent  £300  per  annum,  or  the  freehold  will  be  sold 
for  4,500.     Fo.  626b 

SURREY.— A  very  good  Theatre,  seating  750.  Takings  for  the  last  year  over 
£2,500,  net  profits  over  £t,ooo  a  year.  Price  for  the  whole  as  a  going  concern, 
including  everything,  £1,000.     A  bargain.     Fo.  826)' 

SURREY.— Snug  little  Hall  seating  400.  Average  takings  £35  per  week. 
Making  a  net  profit  of  £600  per  annum.  Rent  £250  per  annum.  Moderate 
premium  to  include  everything.     Fo.  528b 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,  High  Wycombe.— A  Building  Site  at  present  com- 
prising four  cottages  in  the  main  street,  with  a  large  factory  in  the  rear,  having 
a  frontage  to  another  street ;  the  whole  of  the  property  is  now  let  and  producing 
about  £125  per  annum.  Has  a  frontage  of  50-ft.  and  a  depth  of  50-ft.  Price, 
freehold,  £2,000,  two-thirds  of  which  can  remain  on  mortgage.     Fo.  438b 

SURREY.— Cinematograph  Theatre  in  the  High  Street,  80-ft.  by  85-ft.,  with 
seating  capacity  at  present  of  only  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £600.  Rent  £160  per 
annum,  lease  21  years.     Fo.  742b 

SURREY.  — A  fine  building,  having  a  frontage  of  30-fi.  and  a  depth  of  155-ft.. 
with  a  seating  capacity  of  about  700.  The  building  includes  a  residential  upper 
part  and  also  stabling,  which  could  be  easily  let  off.  Lease  50  years.  Ground 
Rent  £35.     Price  £i,5co,  £8  >o  of  which  could  remain  on  mortage.     Fo.  544b 

BERKSHIRE.— Important  Town,  a  good  Theatre,  seating  about  700.  Lease 
tg  years.  Rent  £300  per  annum.  A  sound  concern  able  to  do  a  very  large  busi- 
ness.    Price,  including  electric  light  plant,  £1,50. .     Fo.  651b 

BERKSHIRE. — Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  350.  Rent  £100  per  annum. 
Lease  14  years,  which  includes  a  large  Hall  at  the  back,  let  at  £6  per  week. 
Price,  inclusive,  £700.     Fo.  752b 

OXFORDSHIRE.— A  fine  Building  Site  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre 
to  seat  about  600.     There  is  a  splendid  opening,  and  a  large  business  can  be 
done.     Price  for  the  lease  and  vacant  possession  £200.     Ground  Rent  £125. 
Fo.  552)' 

ESSEX. — A  freehold  Theatre  or  Music  Hall,  newly  built  and  requiring  a  sum 
of  £1,000  to  complete  it.  There  is  no  doubt  that  a  very  large  business  will  be 
done,  and  it  should  prove  a  profitable  concern.  Rent  £750  per  annum,  long  lease. 
Fo.  656b 

SURREY,  Croydon.— A  good  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  just  a  few  doors 
from  the  best  and  busiest  shopping  part,  4S-ft.  by  170-ft.  A  remarkably  good 
opportunity  to  get  one  of  the  best  positions  in  this  important  town.  Price,  free- 
hold, £3,000,  or  £,2000  for  the  999  years  lease,  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £50  per 
annum.     Might  be  let  without  a  premium.     Fo.  7657 

HERTS. — In  a  first-class  Town.  Population  50,000.  An  excellent  site  in  the 
very  best  position,  close  to  the  junction  of  four  main  roads,  43-ft.  wide  by  100-ft. 
deep.  A  Theatre  can  be  erected  for  about  £1,500,  and  there  is  no  doubt  that  a 
very  steady  and  satisfactory  business  could  be  done.  Ground  Rent  £150  (no 
premium).     Fo.  5566b  

SURREY. — With  a  shopping  population  of  between  40,000  and  45,000.  Very 
excellent  Hall,  seating  about  650,  with  stage  and  every  convenience  for  running 
a  Cinematograph  Theatre  with  Turns  if  desired.  Completely  fitted  with  seating 
and  everything  necessary.  The  property  includes  a  residence  and  a  handsome 
building  which  could  be  utilised  as  a  Club.  Dancing  Academy  or  any  other  busi- 
ness wherea  handsome  building  is  required  with  a  number  of  fine  rooms.  Replete 
with  every  convenience,  including  large  tennis  lawn.  Price  £8,000.  Might  be 
let  at  £500  per  annum.     Fo.  6647 

HERTS.,  St.  Albans.— Freehold  Land  and  Buildings  in  the  heart  of  the  City, 
50-ft.  frontage  by  300-ft  deep,  comprising  Two  Large  Dwelling  Houses  with 
Shops  and  Stores.     Gardens  and  yards  at  rear.     Price  £2,750.     Fo.  766y 

KENT. — Very  good  Hall,  seating  300,  fitted  tip-up  seats,  &c.  Established 
three  years.  Takings  average  £20  per  week.  Lease  14  years.  Rent  £275  per 
annum.     Low  price  to  include  everything.     Fo   781b 

KENT.— A  good  Hall  seating  300,  established  1909.  Fitted  tip-up  seats. 
Takings  £35  per  week.  Rent  £200  per  annum.  Price  £1,250,  to  include  every- 
thing. _Fa88iy. 


OXFORDSHIRE. — Cinematograph  Theatre  seating  1,000,  splendidly  fitted, 
tip-up  seats,  &c.  Licenses  in  order.  There  is  no  opposition.  Price  £4,500 
freehold.     Fo.  874 y 

CROYDON. — Site  45-ft.  by  105-ft.  Lease  74  years.  Ground  Rent  £124  per 
annum.     Price  for  the  freehold,  £5,500.     Fo.  785b 

CROYDON.— Corner  Site  37-ft.  6-in.  by  87-tt.  10-in.  Price,  freehold,  £1,000. 
No  theatres  in  the  vicinity.     A  good  spot  for  business.     Fo.  685)- 


w. 


LEACH,  high-class  IRcstorations,  2>ecoratino  &  Sanitary  Morfe. 

DRAWINGS     AND     ESTIMATES     SUBMITTED     FREE. 


'Phone : 
Gerrard  49W 


57,  New  Compton  Street,  Charing  Cross,  W. 


Works : 
Star  Court,  Soho  Square,  \V, 


;S2 


THE    CINEMA. 


February,    1912. 


MIDLANDS. 


DERBYSHIRE.-  Skating  Rink,  frontage  (vtt..  depth  128-ft.,  seating  capacitj 
about  1,000      Established  November,  1909.     Low  price.     Fo.  639b 


\(>l  riNGHAMSHIRE.— Large  mining  district.  Iron  and  timber  built 
riieatre,  fitted  tip-up  sens.  Prices  6d.,  91I..  1  -  and  1  6.  Electric  light,  own 
plant.  Scat  t.ooo.  Built  about  six  years  ago  but  not  yet  opened  as  Picture 
I  neatre.  Unusual  opportunity.  Price  £1,200  as  it  stands,  including  everything. 
Might  be  lei  for  £350  per  annum.     Freehold  can  be  acquired.     Fo.  9903 


V\  VRWICKSHIRE.  A  substantially-built  Theatre,  in  a  prominent  position, 
having  a  frontage  of  164-ft.  Includes  two  lock-up  Shops.  Part  let  oft  at  £100 
per  annum  Fitted  with  ever)  convenience.  I  ease  87  years.  Ground  Rent 
','93  pet"  annum.     Price   £'11,000.  half  of  which  can  remain  on   mortgage.     The 

profits  are  estimated  at  between      i.sooand  •  ;. perannum.    There  is  no  other 

hall  within  two  miles.     Fo.  7753 

LIVERPOOL.— A  large  Hall  seating  joo,  in  a  fine  residental  part  of  the  town. 
including  dwelling  house.  Can  be  had  for  £50  per  annum  and  a  small  premium 
A  fine  opportunit}  for  a  beginner,     bo.  788y 

N.    OF    ENGLAND. 

LANCASHIRE.  -Cinematograph  Theatre,  frontage  jS-ft..  depth  6S-ft. 
seating  about  450.  Price  inclusive  £1,000,  including  generating  plant.  Opened 
January,  191 1.     Fo.  502a 

LANCASHIRE.-  The  Market  Hall  in  an  important  town,  seating  about 
1,000.  At  present  taking  nearly  £40  per  week.  An  old  established  going 
concern.  Rent  £525  per  annum.  A  sum  of  Aoo  will  be  accepted  from  an 
immediate  purchaser.     Fo.  .Siob 


S(  ARBOROUGH.— A  good   Site   for  the  erection  of  a   Theatre   capable  ,,f 
-eating  about  600,  price  freehold  £4,600,     Would  be  let.     Fo.  732b 

LANCASHIRE.     Largi      town,    Theatre   established   two-and-a-half   years, 

making  a  net  profit  of  £10  to  £12  per  week.     Lease  1 years,  at  a   Ground'  Rent 

of£23  Per  annum,  price  £2.500  inclusive.     Fo.  040b 


YORKSHIRE.— Large    Town,    very   tine    building,     previously    used    as  a 
Skating  rink,  which  could  be  converted  into  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  at  a  cost 
of  about  £490,  the  est  ,.l    which   would  be  advanced  at   a  low  rate  of  interest 
Price  as  it  stands  £2,000.     Ground  Rent  £180.     Seating  capacity  about  1,000. 
Fo.  843b 

YORKSHIRE.—  A  Music  Hall  seating  1,400.  in  large  manufacturing  Town 
with  population  of  over  100,000.  Price  freehold,  including  seating  and  all  fittings 
£2,750;  a  mortgage  can  be  arranged  for  £2,400.  The  alterations  to  comply  with 
Borough  requirements  will  cost  about  /'.Son.  Fully  licensed,  including  spirits 
beer,  &c, Fo.  658b 

DURHAM.— A  fine  Theatre  seating  1,500.  Newly  built.  September,  ion.. 
1  lie  freehold  would  be  sold  or  would  be  let  at  £520  per  annum  with  a  premium 
ot  £500.     The  only  place  of  amusement  in  the  Town.     Fo.  859b 


SOUTH    OF    ENGLAND. 


,,.  'U-N,V  -The  newly-built  property  35-ft.  by  100-ft.  Now  used  as  a  Skating 
Kink,  will  cost  an  extremely  small  sum  to  convert  to  a  Cinematograph  Theatre 
Rent  £300,  leas,  7,  i|,  21  years.  No  premium.  If  desired,  the  Skating  Rink  can 
still  be  carried  on,  leaving  a  hall  79-ft.  by  ;s-ft..  which  could  be  used  for  Cine- 
matograph purposes.     Fo.  508a 


KENT.-  Large  sea-side  resort.  In  important  property  having  a  frontage  of 
650-ft.  to  the  sea  with  a  private  Promenade.  Capable  of  accommodating  in 
addition  to  the  Cinematograph  Theatre,  various  other  properties  for  amuse- 
ments, together  with  shops,  etc.  \lthough  a  sum  of  /  4o,,,oo  has  been  expended 
on  the  property,  the  freehold  will  be  sold  for  /  if.  on,,.  '  Fo   722b 


HAMPSHIRE.     Aim,    I, til,    Hall,  fitted  with  elect™    light  plant    doing  a 
large    business    with    the     Military,    being    close    to    the    Camps.         Price    f%w 

inclusive.    Rent  £64  per  annum,      10.523b 


KENT.— Cinematograph  Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  550    in  a  laree 
li    resort    requiring  £250  for  furnishing.     Rent  £200  per  annum,  price  f2<fo 
Fully  licensed,  ready  for  opening  except  furnishing.     Fo  44^1 


WORTHING.  A  Freehold  Site  situated  in  a  most  prominent  position  and 
having  entrances  in  three  thoroughfares,  at  present  consisting  of  four  shops  and 
two  private  houses.     Easily  convertible.     Would  be  let  or  sold.     Fo   744b 


SOI  TH  COAST.— Large  rown  and  well  patronised  pleasure  resort  Cine- 
mat  igraph  Theatre  now  in  course  of  erection.  Corner  premises  with  handsome 
entrance.     Seating  capacity  500.     Price,  freehold  £6,000  (open  to  offer).     Fo.  667V 

E.    OF    ENGLAND. 


SI  FFOLK.-  Large  fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  Frontage  iS4-ft  depth 
75-ft.  Licensed  to  seat  2.000.  Built  two  years  ago  and  heretofore  used  as  1 
skating  Rink.  Price,  freehold,  £4,200,  Might  be  let.  A  realh  well-buih 
propi  rh  and  easil}  convertible.     Fo.  711b 


NORFOLK.     Fishing  and  pleasure  resort.     A   cinematograph  Theatre    etc 
making  net   profit   of  about    £60.1    perannum.      Price,   inclusive,  /'i  000      'l  one 
lease.     Fo.  641b  "  ■-""*. 


FiAST     COAST.— Well-known    Seaside  Town.       Large  building,  splendidly 
adapted  for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.     No  amusements   whatevei   al   p 

Part  can  remain  on  mortgage  if  required.     Fo.  567!, 


Price  £1,100. 


WEST    OF    ENGLAND    &    WALES. 

CORNWALL.— Holding  about  200,  snug  little  Hall,  making  al 1  £5    1  pel 

annum.     Io  be  let  at  a  rental  of  £150.     Low  price  to  immediate  pun  hasei 
. Fo.  10 


CHESHIRE;. — Important  seaside  town  with  very  large  population.  Splen- 
did Site  in  a  good  position,  31-ft.  by  100-ft.  Price,  £1,600.  Freehold  portion  can 
remain.     F'o.  619a 

SHROPSHIRE.— Good  Hall  with  a  seating  capacity  of  over  400.  Price, 
freehold,  £1,500.     Offers  to  rent  will  be  submitted.     Fo.  s'ny 

SHROPSHIRE.— An  exceedingly  suitable  Properly,  easil}  convertible 
adjoining  Bank  premises,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatri 
about  40-ft.  by  No-ft.     Price,  freehold.  £1,500;    or  would  be  let.     Fo.  512b 


GLAMORGAN . — Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  about  750  with  a  balcony 
Rent,  £250.     Price,  inclusive  of  everything,  £400.     F'o.  732V 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— A  very  good  Theatre  in  a  fine  position,  60-ft.  by 
112-ft.,  seating  900.  Rental,  £650:  leas,  14  years.  Price,  including  everything, 
£800.     Fo.  634b 


WALES.  -A  Cinematograph  Theatre  doing  a  good  business  and  in  perfect 
order.  Price  for  the  freehold,  including  all  fittings.  /2.500.  A  partnership 
would  be  entertained.     Fo.  438b 

GLAMORGAN.— Moderate  sized  Hall,  seating  about  350.  Making  a  net 
profit  of  about  £200  per  annum.  A  profit  rental  of  £65  per  annum  would  be 
accepted  without  a  premium.  On  the  property  is  an  electric  light  generating 
plant.     Fo.  840b 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.  Large  manufacturing  town.  A  property  situate  in 
the  best  position,  comprising  two  good  Shops  and  Hall  at  rear  with  entrance 
between  the  shops.  Can  be  extended  to  seat  750  to  800.  Lease  21  years.  Rent 
£350  rising  to  £450  per  annum.     Price  for  the  freehold,  £6,300.     Fo.  886b 

RHONDDA  VALLEY.— Large  town.  Substantially-built  Skating  Rink,  175-ff 
by  65-ft.,  could  be  readily  adapted  into  a  Picture  Palace.  Within  half-a-niinute 
of  the  main  tram  route.     Will  be  let  or  sold.     Fo.  672b 


IRELAND. 


ONE  OF  THE  LARGE  TOWNS.  Cinematograph  Theatre  averaging  £35 
per  week.  Price  for  the  freehold  going  concern,  £6,000.  Seating  475.  The 
property  before  being  converted  was  let  at  £350  per  annum.  The  owner  might 
let  at  a  rental  with  a  small  premium.     Fo.  810b. 


SCOTLAND. 


GLASGOW. — Handsome  Theatre,  80-ft.  by  130-ft.  Seating  1,700,  taking 
nearly  £50  per  week.     Price  inclusive  for  this  valuable  going  concern,  £600. 

Fo.   1   .,li 

GLASGOW. — Cinematograph  Theatre.  Frontage  45-ft.,  depth  90-ft.  At 
present  seating  only  550.  Taking  about  £25  per  week,  under  management. 
Expenses  about  £18  per  week.  Price  £850  for  everything,  which  includes  the 
reside  nee  on  the  property.     Fo.  533b 

EDINBURGH.— Hall  with  seating  capacity  of  350.  fitted  complete.  Books 
can  be  inspected.  No  opposition  in  the  district.  Rent  fioo  per  annum.  Price 
£230  to  include  everything.     Fo.  787b 

FINANCE    81    INVESTMENTS. 

FINANCE  WANTED  to  build  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  in  London  Suburbs, 
Freehold  obtained  and  will  be  given  as  security.  Grand  opening.  Thickly 
populated  district.     Apply  J.  V.  Elliott,  887,  Fulham  Road,  S.W. 


A  CINEMATOGRAPH  THEATRE  wanted  in  London,  Suburbs  or  Home 
Counties.  Not  to  exceed  £3.000.  Must  be  a  good  paying  concern  and  bear 
investigation.  Principals  only  send  particulars  in  confidence  to  E.  Croydon, 
Station  Road,  Hampton-on-Thames. 

THREE  HALLS  WANTED  either  vacant  or  going  concerns,  for  Company 
with  (ash  ready  to  put  down.  Must  have  a  seating  capacity  of  over  500  and  be  in 
London  or  large  Provincial  Town.  Apply  to  A.  W.  Webster,  138,  Lillington 
Street,  S.W. 

1  CASH  READY  for  the  purpose  of  financing  responsible  people  for  building 
Cinematograph  Theatres.  £iS. 000  at  once  available.  Must  be  in  Rood  positions 
and  bear  closest  investigation.  Apply  Messrs.  Robert  Wright  &  Co  .  Chartered 
Accountants,  9  iy  10,  Pancras  Lane.  E.C,     Marked  (Theatres). 


SEATS.— A  quantity  of  seating  for  sale.  Advertiser  just  bought  Hall,  is 
re-fitting  and  has  450  tip-up  seats  in  plush,  in  excellent  condition  to  be  sold  at  a 
very  low  price.     G.  B.,  Box  33,  "  The  Cinema,"  21,  North  Audley  Street,  W. 


Printed  by  Ward  8t  Foxi.ow,  Church  Street,  Marylebone,  N.W.,  and  published  by  the  Proprietors,  the  Cinfma  News  &  Property  Gazette,  Ltd,, 

21,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford. Street,  W. 


March,  1912.  THE     CINEMA. 


ERNEMANNS 

==_=  IMPERATOR.  _=^= 


THE  WORLD'S  BEST  PROJECTOR. 


LONDON— 23,   Cecil    Court, 

w.c. 

Provincial  Agents:-  LIVERPOOL— 18-20,     Man- 

chester Street. 


FILMS 
LTD., 


CARDIFF— 8,  Wyndham 
Arcade,  St.  Mary  Street. 

NEWCASTLE— Midland 

Chambers,  17,  Westgate 
Road. 

BELFAST— 35,   High   Street. 


THE  FILM-RENTING  EXPERTS. 

Originators   of  the 

PREMIER  &  EUREKA  SERVICES. 

First  in  1906.     Still  Leading,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   191 2. 


It  Does  Not  Matter 


\Yhat    your    requirements    are    for    the    thorough    equipment    of    an      Up-to-date    Picture    Theatre,    we 
can    supply    every    want. 

Jury's  Imperial  Projector  (Model  A),   price    £35 
Jury's  Imperial  Projector   (Model  B),   price    £50 

The    two    latest    All-British    Projectors,    containing    more    improvements    than    any    machine    yet    pro- 
duced.     The   outcome   of   years   of   practical    experience. 

Arc     Lamps,    Rh  ostats,    Tip-up     Seats,     Screens,     Rewinders,    Carbons,     Stereopticon 
Lantern,    Mot:r    Generators,    Pehol    Engine    Sets,    &c. 

Don't    forget    you    can    obtain    everything   of    the    Best    from 

JURY'S  KINE  SUPPLIES,  Limited, 

-W.  DAY,  Director  and  Manager, . 

7a,  Upper  St.  Martin's  Lane,  W.C. 

Telephone:    8914  Gerrard.  Telegrams:    "  Jukinsup,  London." 


TELEPHONE:    1280  HOLBORN. 


E.P.AUam&Co., 

ELECTRICAL    ENGINEERS, 

28,  GRAY'S  INN  ROAD,  HOLBORN,  W.C. 

(Established    21  Years.) 


Specialists   in  Arc   and   Incandescent 
Lighting  for  Cinematograph  Theatres* 

HEATING,  VENTILATING, 

SIGNS,    MOTORS,    and 

GENERATORS. 


SOLE  PROPRIETORS  OF  THE 


METAL     LAMP. 

British  made  and  most  durable  filaments. 


Special    Prices     Quoted    on     Application. 


Write  for  our  quotation  and  designs  for  the  most  effective  and 
economical  method  of  lighting  your  premises. 


"EXCLUSIVE"  FILMS .  . 

ARE 

"FEATURE"  FILMS  .  . 


RENTED    TO 


ONE  HALL  PER  TOWN. 


<> 


To  "Star"  an  Exclusive  Feature  Film 
is  the  ideal  method  of  attracting  the 
public  to  p  cture  theatres  —  to  your 
p.cture  theatre— and  the  better  the" film 
and  the  more  it  complies  with  the 
demand  of  the  people  for  sensational 
subjects,  1  he  greater  will  be  its  success. 
We  are  handling  a  number  of  these 
"  Winning  Exclusives,"  and  will  be  glad 
o'lheopportunity  tosendfull  particulars. 
Please  remember  that  all  our  films  are 
rented  on  the  "One  Hall  per  Town" 
principle  and  therefore  cannot  be 
duplicated  by  your  competitors. 


M0N0P0L  FILM  GO.  of  GREAT  BRITAIN 

CINE  HOUSE,  GREEK  STREET,  LONDON,  W. 


Genera!  Manager: 
FREDERICK  MARTIN'. 


Wires: 

"SISTERHOOD,  LONDON. 


THE    CINEMA    NEWS    AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE,    MARCH,    IQ12. 


MR.  GEO.  R.  SIMS  AND  MR.  COULSON  KERNAHAN  ON  THE 
QUESTION  OF  SUNDAY  OPENING. 

(See  Page  8.) 


NEWS    AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE. 

A  MONTHLY  MAGAZINE  OF  IMPORTANCE  TO  ALL  INTERESTED  IN  THE  CINEMATOGRAPH  WORLD. 

Edited    bv    Low    Warren. 


No.  2.     Vol.  I. 


MARCH,    1912. 


Registered. 


Price  One  Penny. 
By  Post,  2d. 


EDITORIAL    AND    BUSINESS   NOTICES. 

THE  CINEMA  News  and  Property  Gazette  is  published  on  the  first  or  each 
month.  Copies  can  be  obtained  through  any  Newsagent  or  Railway  Bookstall 
in  Town  or  Country,  or  will  be  sent  direct  from  the  Office  for  2s.  per  annum, 
post  free. 

News  items  of  interest  to  thise  engaged  in  the  Cinematograph  Industry  will 
be  welcomed,  and  communications  shou'd  reach  the  Office  not  later  than  the 
26th  of  the  month,  it  intended  for  publication  in  the  following  montD's  issue. 

Articles,  photographs,  or  drawings  intended  for  publication  must  be  accom- 
panied by  a  stamped,  addressed  envelope,  in  case  of  return,  but  the  Editor  will 
not  be  responsible  for  the  safe  return  of  rejected  MS.,  photographs,  or  drawings, 
though  every  care  will  be  taken  of  them. 

Editorial  communications,  which  should  always  be  accompanied  by  the  njme 
and  address  of  the  sender,  should  be  addressed  to  the  Editor. 


All  enquirie;   respecting    Advjrti«e  nents  and   business   matters    should    be 
addressed  to  the  Manager,  at  the  Office ;  of  The  Cinema, 

21,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford  Street,  W. 

Wires  :  "Faddist,  London."  'Phones:  Gerrard  7676  &  8798. 

TO  BE— OR  NOT  TO  BE  ? 


TO  be — or  not  to  be? — that  is  the  question  which 
has  been  agitating  the  minds  of  all  interested  in 
the  cinematograph  industry  ever  since  the  ap- 
pearance of  an  obscure  paragraph  in  the  papers 
announcing  that  a  deputation  had  waited  upon 
the  Home  Secretary  with  a  view  to  urging  the 
necessity  of  appointing  a  censor,  whose  duty  it  would  be  to 
license  all  cinematograph  films  intended  for  exhibition  in  this 
country. 

About  the  necessity  or  the  expediency  of  making  such  an  ap- 
pointment there  can  be  no  two  opinions.  There  has  been  too 
much  talk  of  censors  and  censorship  in  the  theatrical  world 
recently,  and  we  can  see  for  ourselves  what  it  has  done  for  the 
theatrical  and  music  hall  proprietor.  Presumably  this  talk  of  a 
film  censor  is  the  natural  outcome  of  that  agitation  ;  perhaps  it 
is  not.  Whatever  control  may  be  necessary  in  the  future,  we 
can  say  without  hesitation  that  at  present  a  cinema  censor  is  not 
only  entirely  unnecessary,  but  that  such  an  appointment  would 
inflict  an  undeserved  hardship,  and  cast  a  perhaps  unintentional 
aspersion  upon  the  cinematograph  industry  as  a  whole. 

The  deputation  referred  to  included  the  representatives  of 
several  well-known  firms  of  manufacturers,  and  it  is  somewhat 
surprising  to  learn  that  a  certain  section  of  the  Trade  not  only 
desire  but  will  welcome  the  appointment  of  a  Film  Censor,  on  the 
grounds  that  "  there  have  been  complaints  against  the  British 
Trade  as  to  the  undesirable  nature  of  some  of  the  pictures 
shown  in  what  might  be  called  irresponsible  theatres."  To 
ask  for  so  radical  a  change  on  these  grounds  is  surprising. 
Are  we  so  powerless  as  a  Trade  that  we  cannot  take  steps  to 
prevent    the    dissemination    of    an    undesirable    class    of    fiim? 


Surely  not.  Our  advice  to  the  Trade  as  a  whole  is  to  leave 
the  question  of  the  appointment  of  a  Film  Censor  severely 
alone  for  the  present,  otherwise  it  will  recoil  upon  their  own 
heads  in  a  way  which  is  plain  to  see. 

In  saying  this  we  are  fully  aware  of  the  fact  that  both  in 
America  and  Germany  there  is  a  systematic  inspection  of  all 
films  befure  they  are  licensed  for  release  to  the  exhibitor.  But 
such  a  system  is  open  to  very  grave  abuse.  In  America  we  be- 
lieve it  works  fairly  satisfactorily,  but  in  Germany  quite  the  re- 
verse is  the  case.  There,  officialdom  is  chiefly  concerned  in 
keeping  a  look-out  for  films  which  in  any  way  encourage  the  in- 
dustrial classes  to  strike,  or  whi;h  reflect,  however  remotely, 
upon  the  laws  of  the  country.  From  a  moral  standpoint  there 
are  scores  of  films  released  in  Germany  which  no  self-respecting 
picture  theatre  proprietor  would  for  one  moment  think  of  ex- 
hibiting in  this  country. 

We  mention  this  fact  as  showing  the  abuses  to  which  the 
system  is  subject  in  other  lands.  We  do  not  say  that  ultimately  it 
may  not  be  necessary  to  appoint  a  Film  Censor  in  England.  What 
we  do  say  is  that  such  an  appointment  would  be  most  inoppor- 
tune and  unnecessary  at  present.  Later  on,  as  the  trade  grows 
in  size  and  importance,  and  as  the  number  of  manufacturers  and 
agents  increases,  it  may  be  necessary,  and  desiraDle,  as  much  in 
the  interest  of  the  Trade  as  the  public,  to  make  such  an  ap- 
pointment. But  the  time  is  not  yet.  Those  who  maintain  that 
it  is,  evidently  lose  sight  of  the  fact  that  public  opinion  is  after 
all  the  best  censor  in  these  matters.  So  far  we  have  seen  very 
few  films  that  required  blue  pencilling.  Some  may  not  have 
been  altogether  happily  conceived,  but  the  worst  that  could  be 
said  of  them  was  that  they  offended  more  or  less  against  the 
canons  of  good  taste. 

Those  who  have  tried  to  set  up  a  Censorship  of  Films  have 
had  a  nasty  rebuff  within  the  last  few  days  in  a  place  where 
it  might  be  least  expected— the  Theatres  and  Music-Halls  Com- 
mittee of  the  L.C.C.  The  Fulham  Borough  Council  suggested 
that  the  L.C.C.  should  appoint  a  Censor,  and  that  body  replied 
that,  in  their  opinion,  "the  entertainments  in  cinematograph 
halls  are  best  treated  in  the  same  way  as  in  music-halls  and 
other  places  under  its  control."  Which  is  a  nice  way  of  telling 
this  meddlesome  local  authority  to  mind  its  own  business, 
advice  which,  we  trust,  will  not  be  lost  upon  it  and  others 
similarly   inclined. 

The  cinematograph  theatre  has  come  to  stay,  and  it  will  con- 
tinue to  thrive  and  grow  in  public  esteem,  despite  the  senseless 
efforts  of  a  few  maniacs  and  intolerant  bigots  to  put  it  down.  The 
average  picture  theatre  proprietor  strives  lb  put  on  a  clean  show, 
and  his  efforts  to  please  his  public  are  attested  by  crowded  audi- 
ences, which  would  be  the  first  to  resent  anything  in  the  nature 
of  suggestiveness.  We  may  therefore  safely  leave  the  censoring 
of  films  for  the  time  beine  to  the  public,  for  whose  amusement 
after  all,  the  films  are  produced. 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,    1912 


THE    NEWS    OF    THE     MONTH 


AT     A     GLANCE. 


NEW  picture  theatre,   the  Villiers,  has  been  opened 

A        at      Sunderland.       Seating      accommodation,       1,000 
persons. 

The  Inverkeithing  Uean  of  Guild   Court  have  re- 
cently passed  the  plans  for  a  picture  theatre  costing 
£2.000,    to   be     erected    by    the    Scottish     Electric- 
Theatres  Company. 

Sidmouth  has  another  picture  theatre,  the  property  of  a 
local   gentleman. 

The  proprietors  of  the  Roscoe  Picture  Palace,  Sheffield,  hive 
been  fined  £5  for  overcrowding. 

St.  John's-lane,  Bristol,  is  to  have  a  new  electric  theatre. 
This  makes  27  theatres  in  Bristol. 

A  cinema  theatre  will  shortly  be  erected  in  Church-street, 
Heywood,  Lanes,  at  a  cost  of  ,£3,000. 

To  attract  Saturday  crowds,  the  Clapton  Rink  Cinema 
illuminates   its  front  with  another  250  lights. 

Eastbourne  has  acquired  a  new  picturedrome,  with  a  seating 
capacity    of    400.     Manager,    Mr.    Marcus    Perry. 

A  new  house,  known  as  the  Royal  Cinema,  has  been  opened 
at  Walthamstow,   close  to  the  Walthamstow   Palace. 

The  new  theatre  that  Mr.  Dickson  is  building  at  Bo'ness  is 
being  rapidly  completed,   and  it  is  hoped  to  open  this  month. 

Burnham,  in  Somerset,  is  to  have  a  new  electric  theatre,  in 
order  to  accommodate  the  seaside  crowds.  The  building  will 
cost    £"1,2915. 

The  New  Picture  Hall  at  Carlisle  has  just  been  opened.  The 
electrical  work  was  supervised  by  Mr.  Barber,  the  cinemato- 
graph expert. 

Oak  Park,  Illinois,  Board  of  Education  are  installing  motion 
pictures  in  their  principal  schools.  We  hope  England  will 
soon    follow  suit. 

Chief  Constable  Thomson,  of  Forfar,  believes  that  the  intro- 
duction of  cinematograph  shows  has  contributed  largely  to  the 
decrease  of  crime  in  Forfar. 

Another  picture  theatre  is  to  be  built  in  Scarborough,  and 
will  be  known  as  the  Clarence  Picture  Palace.  It  will  be  built 
on  a  site  adjoining  the  North  Riding  Hotel. 

Politics  aro  feeling  the  pinch  of  picture  theatres.  The 
"  Standard  "  complains  that  local  politicians  cannot  find  halls  for 
meetings  as  they  are  taken  by  picture  theatres. 

Paris  audiences  are  tricky  in  their  tastes,  preferring  sensa- 
tional and  cowboy  films.  Travel  films  are  not  approved  of,  and 
few  British  films  seem  to  hit  the  popular  taste. 

Hungary  cherishes  its  weird  language,  and  to  that  end  the 
Hungarian  Government  have  given  orders  that  all  film  titles 
are  to  be  in   Magyar.      More  work   for  the  showmen. 

Mr.  Beecham's  electric  theatre  in  the  High-road,  Kilburn,  is 
being  redecorated.  The  film  service  is  supplied  by  the 
Williamson  Kinematograph  Company,  and  is  giving  every 
satisfaction. 

In  addition  to  the  building  of  cinema  halls,  Messrs.  F.  Farrell  and 
Co.,  Ltd,,  of  Hampstead,  have  started  a  decorations  department, 
stocked  with  all  necessary  tackle  and  plant  for  so  doing,  without 
stopping  the  show. 

Exciting  scenes  were  witnessed  at  a  fire  at  a  Bolton  picture 
theatre,  where  a  mass  of  film  in  the  pay-box  caught  fire.  The 
lady  clerk  was  discovered  unconscious  on  the  floor  badly  burnt 
about  the  face  and  hands.  The  film  operator  was  also  badly 
burnt,  and  had  to  be  removed  to  the  infirmary. 


The  Halifax  Free  Church  Council  hired  an  electric  theatre 
to  attract  the  Sunday  evening  crowd.  When  confronted  with  a 
collection  and  no  free  films,  the  crowd  faded  away,  and  the 
experiment   proved  a  financial  failure. 

Messrs.  Pathe  Freres  Cinema,  Limited,  are  asking  their  cus- 
tomer's which  class  of  subjects  is  most  appreciated  at  their 
theatres.  Their  intention  in  seeking  this  information  is  to- 
produce  what  their  patrons  most  desire. 

A  girl  who  was  sent  to  a  reformatory  for  three  years  for 
committing  a  burglary  at  Blaenau  Festiniog,  blamed  cinemato- 
graph pictures  for  her  crime.  She  said  she  had  seen  pictures 
of  housebreaking  and  thefts,  and  they  had  such  an  Influence 
on  her  as  to  prompt  her  to  commit  burglar)'  herself. 

The  Dalbeattie  Town  Council,  having  had  the  safety  of  their 
Town  Hall  called  in  question,  and  their  attention  directed  to 
this  point  by  a  letter  from  the  Under-Secretary  for  Scotland, 
have  made  alterations  in  order  to  bring  up  the  Hall  to  the 
standard  of  security  required   by  the  Cinematograph  Act. 

The  picture  theatres  did  a  great  deal  towards  causing  the 
Chinese  revolution,  according  to  a  correspondent  of  the  "  Temps." 
His  theory  is  that  the  cinematograph  has  helped  to  break  the 
traditions  of  ages  by  bringing  very  realistically  before  the 
Chinese  the  different  life  and  manners   of  Western  civilisation. 

The  Syndicat  Professionnel  des  Auteurs  Dramatiques  is  dis- 
cussing an  important  point  with  the  cinematograph  trade. 
According  to  French  law,  authors  of  plays  which  are  publicly 
produced  must  receive  a  percentage  of  the  theatre  receipts.  The 
syndicate  claims  that  moving  picture  dramatists  have  the  same 
right,   and  that  the  picture   theatres   should   pay   tribute. 

There  are  so  many  dramas  of  1,000  feet  issued  at  present 
which  lack  even  the  semblance  of  a  plot,  and  in  which  scene 
after  scene  is  rushed  through  at  a  ridiculously  high  speed,  that 
the  Gaumont  Film  Hire  Service  is  coming  to  the  conclusion 
that  it  is  hardly  possible  to  produce  a  film  having  a  decent 
story,  well  produced  and  thought  out,  under  about  2,500  feet 
in   length. 

The  official  title  of  the  new  organisation  for  the  protection 
of  exhibitors,  the  first  meeting  of  which  was  reported  in  our 
last  issue,  is  the  Cinematograph  Exhibitors'  Association  of 
Great  Britain  and  Ireland.  Mr.  E.  J.  Muddle  is  the  secretary 
pro  tern.,  and  his  address  is  16,  Cecil-court,  Charing  Cross, 
W.C.  He  will  be  glad  to  hear  from  anyone  interested  in  the 
new  association. 

The  Empress,  Mare-street,  Hackney,  has  made  a  promising 
start.  The  hall  has  a  seating  capacity  of  650.  The  Mayor  and 
Mayoress  of  Hackney  and  members  of  the  Council  were  present 
at  a  private  reception,  held  prior  to  the  public  opening.  Mr. 
Arthur  Gilbert  is  the  manager,  and  the  seating  and  furnishing 
was  carried  out  by  Messrs.  H.  Lazarus  and  Son,  Limited,  of 
Great  Eastern-street,  E.C. 

A  very  successful  little  entertainment  was  recently  given  by 
the  management  and  staffs  of  the  Charing  Cross  and  Argyll 
Electric  Theatres  to  their  friends  and  others  interested  in  the 
cinematograph  business,  on  the  occasion  of  the  first  annual 
dinner.  Dancing  was  indulged  in  afterwards,  and  the  whole 
affair  proved  a  brilliant  success  and  a  sure  testimonial  to  the 
popularity  of  Mr.    McGaw,   the  manager. 

A  strange  audience  for  a  cinematograph  show  was  that  at 
Peterhead  Penal  Settlement,  where  an  afternoon  cinematograph 
entertainment  was  granted  to  the  convicts  by  the  kindness  of 
Provost  Leask  and  the  permission  of  the  Prison  Commissioners. 
The  prisoners  were  well  behaved,  and  greeted  the  films  with 
loud  applause.  Some  of  the  older  inmates  had  never  seen 
moving  pictures  before.  The  programme  was  varied  by  songs 
and  musical  selections  of  a  character  likely  to  appeal  to  the 
men. 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


The  Brighton  Corporation  has  recently  been  advocating  its 
scheme  for  trackless  traction  by  giving  a  series  of  cinemato- 
graph films  showing  the  working  of  tb.e  trolley  system  in  other 
towns. 

The  Newcastle  Town  Improvement  Committee  have  decided 
in  future  to  insert  a  clause  in  all  new  licences  for  picture 
theatres  that  any  variety  entertainment  on  the  premises  is  not 
to  exceed  20  minutes  in  all,  should  be  confined  to  singing  and 
music,  and  should  not  involve  the  use  of  scenery  or  stage 
accessories  other  than  a  curtain,  and  that  no  dangerous  lighting 
apparatus  or  inflammable  costume  be  allowed  behind  the 
proscenium. 

At  the  King's  Picture  Playhouse,  King's-road,  Chelsea,  a 
special  matinee  was  given  last  week  in  aid  of  the  Kensington 
and  Chelsea  Benevolent  Society.  The  performance  was  attended 
by  a  number  of  well-known  local  people,  including  the  Mayor 
of  Chelsea,  and  an  interesting  feature  was  the  film  of  "  L'Enfant 
Prodigue.''  This  piece  was  produced  as  a  wordless  play  at  the 
Prince  of  Wales'  Theatre,  London,  in  1891,  and  has  just  been 
filmed   in   Paris  with   the  original  cast. 

Recently  I  drew  attention  to  the  fact  that  English  films  were 
forging  ahead,  despite  the  long  row  in  front  of  them,  says  a  writer 
in  the  Evening  News  A  few  nights  ago  I  saw  a  series  of  films  by 
the  Hepworth  Company — English  in  everything,  including  artists 
and  scenery — which  gave  convincing  proof  that,  although,  as 
usual,  a  little  behind  in  the  start,  an  English  firm,  when  it  sets 
itself  to  accomplish  a  certain  end,  can  do  it  by  the  motive  force  of 
that  perseverance  which  never  knows  defeat. 

At  the  Bradford  licensing  sessions  it  was  stated  that  there 
were  sixteen  places  holding  cinematograph  licences,  of  which 
four  had  annual  music  licences,  and  five  dramatic  licences,  the 
remaining  seven  being  occasionally  licensed  for  music.  The 
Chief  Constable  said  that  it   would  be  more   satisfactory  if  all 


such  places  were  under  one  kind  of  licence,  and  were  all  purely 
and  simply  "  picture  halls,"  and  not  music-halls  or  theatres. 
At  the  same  time,  they  were,  without  exception,  well  con- 
ducted, and  the  conduct  of  the  people  frequenting  them  was 
in  every  way  satisfactory.  Music  licences  only  were  granted  to 
Queen's  Hall,  Tower's  Hall,  and  the  Idle  Picture  Palace,  on 
the  condition  that  music  was  to  be  solely  an  accompaniment 
to  the  pictures.     The  other   applications  were   refused. 

At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  National  Association  of  Cine- 
matograph Operators,  held  at  the  Bedford  Head  Hotel,  Maiden- 
lane,  Mr.  Mason  (president)  took  the  chair,  while  a  very  satis- 
factory report  of  the  year's  progress  was  presented.  The  rules 
of  the  association  were  altered  in  order  to  permit  of  the 
admission  of  all  ranks  of  operators,  and  reference  was  made  to 
the  publication  of  the  proposed  li  Operators  Licensing  Bill," 
which  is  shortly  to  be  reissued  in  an  improved  form,  and 
efforts  made  tp  introduce  it  into  Parliament  as  soon  as  possible. 
The  1912  officers  and  committee  are  as  follows: — President, 
Mr.  Edward  H.  Mason  ;  vice-president,  Mr.  J.  Hutchins  ;  hon. 
treasurer,  Mr.  W.  Johnson ;  and,  temporarily,  as  hon.  secre- 
tary, Mr.  Mason ;  committee,  Messrs.  Catlin,  Green,  Sayers, 
Watson,  Malcolm,  and  McDonnell. 


The  newly  built  Bishop's  Stortford  Cinema  is  to  be  managed 
by  Mr.  Alfred  J.  Hatrick,  who  was  for  two  years  manager  of 
the    Premier    Electric    Theatre,    Leytonstone. 

The  staff  of  the  Olympia  Picture  Theatre,  Cardiff,  have  pre- 
sented their  late  manager,  Mr.  W.  O'Keefe,  with  a  valuable 
dressing-case. 

The  directors  of  the  Irish  Provincial  Electric  Theatres, 
Limited,  give  the  employees  of  the  Electric  Picture  Palace, 
Newry,  two  weeks'  wages  as  a  Christmas  gift,  and  to  show 
their  appreciation  of  Mr.  Gun-Cooke,  the  manager,  gave  him 
a  clear    benefit    of  two  house:;. 


"C.  &  G." 
CINEMA     AND     GENERAL    SUPPLY     CO., 

49,  Whyteville  Road,  Forest  Gate,  London,  E. 

Telegrams-"  CINESUPPLY,  LONDON."  Telephone:  CITY  7719. 

Night  and  Sunday :  Stratford  459. 

THE     BEST    ADVERTISEMENTS     ARE     SATISFIED      CUSTOMERS.       HERE     ARI 

*  SOME: — "Well   pleased  with  this  week's  program.     Kindly  include 

similar  pictures   in   all   future   programs."     "Never   any   cause   for 

complaint.    Shall  always  recommend  yours  as  the  finest  service  I  have 

had  during  six  years'  experience." 

7IG0MAR    v.    NICK     CARTER,    released    March    24,  3,600  ft.      Free  April  29. 
™  IN     THE     GRIP     OF    ALCOHOL,    2,600    ft.        LADY     MARY'S     LOVE, 

2,300  ft.  Three  days  20s.,  week  40'.  each.  PATHE  GAZETTES, 
GRAPHICS,  BUDGETS,  200  to  300  ft.,  3s.  each,  or  hire  cheap. 

INSCRIPTIVE      STICKERS,     six     varieties,    printed     "Drama,"     "Comedy," 
-"**  "Comic,"    "Travel,"    "Interest,"    "Coloured,"    6d.    100    assorted. 

Specimens  free. 

IWIANAGERS'    AND  OPERATORS'    TABLETS     (washable)   6d.   each.       Specimen 
"■  free  to  any  manager.     "  C.  and  G."  FOUNTAIN  PENS,  i4Ct.  gold  nib,  2/6, 

with  patent  clip  or  leather  safety  pocket. 

CIRST    WEEK'S    HIRE   AT  HALF    PRICE.— State    requirements    and   send    for 
■  Specimen  Program   at   10s.    per    1000.     List    A,     including   Zululand, 

Queen  Nineveh.  Castaways,  Price  Beauty,  Temptations  Great  City, 
Courier  Lyons,  Faust,  S-miramis,  Robinson  Crusoe,  Pirates  cf  1920, 
David  and  Goliath.  Telephone,  Nero,  Dancer  of  Siva,  Grenadier 
Roland,  Tale  Two  Cities,  Back  Primitive,  Still  Alarm,  Law  of  Mercy, 
Resurrection,  Enoch  Arden,  Fighting  Blood.  Range  Pals,  Star- 
Spangled  Banner,  Foe  to  Richelieu,  Louisa  Millar,  and  all  the  best 
comedies,  comics,  etc. 

IRE  CHEAP— TOP-LINE  DRAMAS,  ALSO  COMPLETE  PROGRAMS.-5.00O 
feet  (two  changes  £4,  including  at  least  one  of  List  B:—  Queen 
Criminals,  Last  Drop  Water,  In  Grip  Alcohol,  Railroad  Raiders, 
Gambling  Mania,  Captain  Kat=.  Reign  of  Terror,  Quaker  Mother, 
Battle  Hymn  Republic,  Notre  Dame,  Lady  Marv's  Love,  Salambo, 
Tristan  Isolde,  Battle  Trafalgar,  Quality  Mercy,  Rory  O'More,  Power 
of  Fate,  St.  Hel°na,  Rob  Roy,  Aerial  Anarchists  ,  Dead  Man's  Child, 
Robert  Bruce,  Siege  Calais,  Brutus,  Lost  in  Jungle,  Opium  Smoker, 
Two  Orphans.  Henry  VIII.,  Colleen  Bawn,  Robert  Emmet,  Three 
Musketeers,  Martyrs,  Battle,  Prisoner  Mexico,  Lieut.  Daring,  Thrown 
to  Lions,  Captain  Brand's  Wife,  Four  Daredevils,  Queen's  Necklace, 
Inner  Mind.  Oliver  Cromwell,  Lady  Godiva,  Fane  Shore,  Cowboy 
Pugilist.  Lieut.  Rose  Battleship.  At  Bottom  of  Sea,  Golden  Scarf, 
Fatal  Lie,  Mystery  of  Souls,  Auld  Lang  Syne,  Arrah-na-Pogue,  Chain 
of  Oath,  Sins  of  Fathers,  Flight  to  Death,  Peep  behind  Scenes, 
Ballet  Dancer,  Ruy  Bias,  Charlie  Colms,  Absolom,  Ladv  Camelias, 
Arson  at  Sea,  and  all  other  top-liners,  from  15/-  per  1,000  feet,  per 
week,  two  Changes.     Send  for  full  list  and  vacant  dates. 

►INEMA  AND   GENERAL   SUPPLY   CO.,  49.    Whyteville   Road,    For.st  Gate,   E. 
'  TELEGRAMS:     "Cinesupply,     London.''      TELEPHONE :  —  7719    CITY. 

Night  and  Sunday-Stratford  459. 


L.C.C.  PATTERN. 


H 


SLIDING  STENCIL  CUT  FRONT. 


For  any  llluminant. 
Opal    or    Red    Glass. 

(As  shown.) 

Emergency  Exit   -  11/- 
Exit    -----  10/- 

Without  fancy  work. 
Emergency  Exit   -  10/= 
Exit 9/- 

Any  other  signs  quoted  for. 
Discount  for  quantities. 


MANSELL,  Ltd.,  13a.  Cecil  Court, 

'Phone  8982  City  W.C. 


Scenarios  for  Cinematograph  Pictures. 

This  is  a  new  field  open  to  all  people  who  can  write  up  simple 
ideas  for  Motion  Picture  Plays.  Interesting  and  lucrative 
occupation.  Anyone  can  write  them.  No  literary  ability  needed. 
Unlimited  demand.    Good  pay. 

If  you  wish  to  increase  your  income,  let  us  teach  you  to  write 
Scenarios.  We  can  do  so  by  correspondence.  Send  stamp 
addressed  envelope  for  particulars. 

Plot-writers. 

We  have  special  facilities  for  placing  Plots  and  Scenarios  with 
the  film  producers.  Let  us  place  yours.  Our  terms  are:  Reading 
fee  1/-;  10  per  cent,  commission  when  plot  is  sold.  For  further 
particulars,  stamped  envelope  to 

International  Motion  Picture  School  &  Agency 

81=83,  SHAFTESBURY  AVENUE,  LONDON,  W. 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


!'  Popular  .  .  . 
I: Picture  Palaces 


AND    THEIR 
MANAGERS. 


/-..; 


No.    II.— THE    CAMBRIDGE    CIRCUS    CINEMA.— MR.    RICHARD   JOHNSON. 


A       YEAR  AGO  a  coach-builder's  yard ! 
To-day  what  may  be  described,  without  exaggeration, 
as  one  of  the  most  artistically  designed  and  sumptu- 
ously fitted  cinematograph  theatres  in  the  Metropolis. 
Harnessed    up    to  the   Pyke  Circuit,    the  Cambridge 
Circus     Cinematograph     Theatre     was     opened     as 
r;cently  as  September  2nd  of  last  year.     Long  enough,  however, 
to  have  won  the    support    of 
countless   patrons,   who  Lave 
developed    into    regular   and 
enthusiastic  supporters. 

Within  a  stone's  throw  of  the 
Circus  from  which  it  takes  its 
name,  this  bandscme  theatre 
forces  itself  upon  the  attention 
of  the  casual  passer  by  the 
unusually  ariisfc  appearance 
of  its  vestibule.  Unusual  it  is 
in  every  sense,  and  artistic  to 
a  degree,  and  the  handsome 
entrance  strikes  an  entirely 
new  note  in  cinematograph 
theatre  design  It  has  all  the 
appearance  of  a  fine  baronial 
hall.  This  effect  is  heightened 
by  the  armour  figure  which 
faces  one  on  entering,  the  rich 
oak  panelling  which  lines  the 
walls,  the  reproductions  of  old 
masters  which  hang  around, 
and  the  quaint,  old-fashioned 
lanterns  which  cast  a  subdued 
light  over  all.  The  scheme 
throughout  is  Jacobean,  and 
one  distinguishes  without  dif- 
ficulty the  sign  of  the  rose  and 
portcullis   upon   the   ceilings. 

But  let  us  enter.  If  the  vestibule  was  impressive,  v  hat  shall  we 
say  of  the  theatre  ?  For  the  moment  it  almost  makes  one  gasp 
with  astonishment.  A  baronial  hall  in  very  truth,  and  correct  to 
a  detail.  In  the  dim  light  one  can  discern  weapons  of  a  bygone 
age  banging  high  up  above  the  rich  oak  panelling,  and  the  decora- 
tive Jacobean  ceiling  that  would  not  disgrace  one  of  the  "  stately 
homes  of  England,"  and  yet  at  the  far  end  they  are  showing 
pictures!  It  makes  one  pause  and  think  Comparisons  are 
always  odious,  but  one  cannot  help  thinking  of  some  of  the  first 
of  the  buildings  devoted  to  the  exhibition  of  this  new  world  force 
in  the  realm  of  Art.  Truly  we  move  apace,  and  love  of  luxury 
increases  by  leaps  and  bounds.  A  cinematograph  show  in  a 
Jacobean  baronial  hall.     Incongruous  !     True  ;  but  delightful  ! 

Row  upon  row  of  softly  seductive  easy  chairs  and  tilt-up  seats  in 
red  plush,  and  a  thick  pile  carpet  of  the  same  colour  to  walk  upon. 
And  the  prices  of  admission  range  from  sixpence  to  eighteenpence. 
The  theatre  holds  450  persons,  and  the  show  is  continuous  from 
two  o'clock  till  eleven  in  the  evening.  They  believe  in  long 
programmes  here,  for  they  show  their  patrons  from  7,000  to  8,000 
teet  of  films  at  a  sitting,  and  all  of  the  very  best.  Up-to-date,  too;   for 


the  afternoon  I  looked  in  to  see  Mr.  Richard  Johnson,  the  manager 
they  were  actually  showing  the  King's  procession  to  open  Parlia 
ment  within  an  hour-and-a-half  of  the  event  taking  place. 

"  We  make  a  speciality  of  long  films  and  exclusives — when  we 
can  get  them,"  said  Mr.  Johnson.  "I  believe  in  them;  and  I 
always  try  to  get  one  good  feature  film  for  my  programme — some- 
thing out  of  the  ordinary.     We  cater  for  a  cosmopolitan  audience, 

and  we  do  not  use  more 
American  films  than  we  can 
help — except  those  depicting 
cow-boy  life.  We  make  a 
speciality  of  Italian  and  French 
films." 

The  pictures  are  perfectly 
shown ,  and  no  doubt  the  depth 
of  the  set-back,  and  the  sur- 
rounding black  velvet  con- 
tribute in  no  small  measure 
to  this  striking  clarity.  Gau- 
mont  projectors  are  used,  and 
the  throw  is  about  80  feet. 
The  operator's  room  is  un- 
usually spacious,  and  a  separ- 
ate lantern  throws  the  titling 
slides  upon  the  screen 
Apropos,  it  may  be  interesting 
to  mention  that  Mr.  Johnson 
makes  a  point  of  announcing 
once  during  each  programme 
the  special  feature  of  his 
"  change." 


*.* 


Greenwich    Time. 


CAMBRIDGE     CIRCUS     CINEMA 
THE    VESTIBULE. 


Patrons  can  watch  the  fleet- 
ing minutes  as  they  follow 
the  fortunes  of  hero  and 
heroine,  or  the  screamingly  absurd  antics  of  the  comedy  merchant, 
for  facing  them  is  an  illuminated  clock  on  the  prompt  side,  which 
is  synchronised  fn  m  Greenwich  Observatory.  The  soothing 
strains  of  a  delithtful  orchestra  add  to  the  enjoyment,  and  I 
cannot  refrain  from  paying  a  well-de<erved  compliment  to  HerrM. 
G.  Fericescu,  whose  Royal  Roumanian  Orchestra  is  quite  a 
noticeable  ieature  of  the  performance.  The  secret  of  appropriate 
music,  as  a  necessary  accompaniment  to  the  pictures,  is  fully 
understood  here,  and  when  I  had  a  chat  with  the  leader  of  this 
clever  Iitt'e  orchestra  of  six  (two  violins,  a  piano,  Mustel  organ, 
'cello  and  bass)  I  appreciated  the  reason.  They  have  a  highly- 
gifted  leader,  and  nearly  a  thousand  pieces  of  music  to  select  from 
in  the  theatre  library.'  Mr.  Johnson  and  Herr  Fericescu,  run 
over  every  programme,  and  decide  what  the  selection  shall  be,  and 
then  put  it  on  without  rehearsal 

The    Manager. 

And  what  manner  of  man  is  the  manager  of  the  Cambridge 
Circus  Cinema  ?  Out  of  the  ordinary  ?  Yes  ;  though  he  has  been 
connected  with  the  theatrical  business  all  his  life.     Mr.   Richard 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


THE    CINEMA    MAN    IN    UNKNOWN 
AUSTRALIA. 


INTERIOR    OF     THE     THEATRE. 

Johnson  has  been  with  the  Pyke  Circuit  for  two  years,  and  prior 
to  taking  the  management  here  was  in  charge  of  the  same  firm's 
theatre  in  Piccadilly  Circus.  Before  that  he  was  associa'ed  with 
the  managerial  staffs  of  well-known  West  End  theatres.  He  is  a 
rmn  who  takes  his  work  seriously.  His  theatre  is  his  hobby,  and 
he  has  a  theatre  of  which  he  mav  well  fe°l  proud.  He  is  always  to 
be  found  at  his  post  between  the  hours  of  10.30  a.m.  and  11  p.m. 

Assuredly  he  can  feel  he  his  done  a  good  day's  work   when  he 
goes  home  to  bed. 


It  has  occurred  to  me  that  it  temperance  films  were  in  exist- 
ence it  might  be  possible  to  arrange  with  the  picture  shows  to 
give  a  Band  of  Hope  or  Temperance  Evening  occasionally, 
which  the  local  Unions  would  gladly  advertise,  and  thus  secure 
crowded  audiences  for  them. — Band  of  Hope  Chronicle. 


THIRTY  thousand  miles  is  a  long  way  to  go  for  a 
kinematograph  film.  Add  tribes  of  savage  and 
treacherous  black  men,  an  almost  unknown  country, 
and  a  superabundance  of  venomous  reptiles,  and 
one  is  able  to  form  a  very  fair  idea  of  the  kind  of 
enterprise  cheerfully  undertaken  by  the  kinematograph 
operator  in  pursuit  of  striking  films.  The  gentleman  making  this 
particular  trip  is  Mr.  A.  L.  Haydon,  whohas  written  books  about 
various  quarters  of  the  globe,  and  is  making  a  special  study 
of  the  world's  mounted  police.  He  is  going  out  for  the  Warwick 
Trading  Company,  with  recommendations  from  Sir  George  Reid, 
High  Commissioner  for  Australia,  and  from  the  Minister  for  the 
Interior  at  Melbourne,  to  spend  two  or  three  months  up  country 
in  the  Northern  Territory  of  South  Australia  taking  kinemato- 
graph pictures. 

The  Northern  Territory  remains  to  this  day  a  geographical 
enigma.  Practically  nothing  has  been  learned  of  vast  stretches 
of  the  region  since  Burke  and  Wills  crossed  it  on  their  disastrous 
expedition  of  forty  years  ago.  Mr.  Haydon,  therefore,  should 
get   some  striking  films. 

He  hopes  to  get  a  picture  of  one  remarkable  thing  of  which 
he  has  never  seen  a  photograph,  though  drawings  hiTe  been 
done  by  naturalists.  This  is  a  snake  corroboree.  At  01  e  period 
of  the  day,  too,  the  animals  and  birds  of  the  plain  ami  forest 
troop  to  the  water  hole  to  drink.  That  is  what  Mr.  Haydon 
hopes  to  get.  Certainly  a  living  picture  of  all  ''Australia" 
parading  down  to  the  water  hole  should  be  fascinating. 

Mr.  Haydon,  who  is  starting  next  month,  will  go  first  to  Perth, 
then  northward  along  the  coast  to  Broome,  and  the  "  ninety-mile 
beach,"  the  Asiatic  corner  of  Australia,  where  he  will  take 
pictures  of  the  Japanese  and  Polynesian  pearl  fishers  at  work. 
He  will  then  go  on  to  Port  Darwin,  and  from  there  start  his 
800  mile  journey  into  the  interior.  Afterwards  he  will  go  to 
Sydney.  From  Sydney  he  will  leave  for  South  Africa,  where  he 
is  to  be  the  guest  of  the  Natal  Mounted  Police,  who  have  pro- 
mised to  show  him  all  over  Natal  and  Zululand,  showing  him 
native  life  there. — Kinematograph. 


F.  FARRELL  &  Co.,  Ltd., 


CINEMATOGRAPH  THEATRE  BUILDERS. 


STRUCTURAL  ALTERATIONS   AND   REDECORATION 

SCHEMES    CARRIED    OUT    WITHOUT    INTERFERING 

WITH    DAILY    PERFORMANCES. 


We  make  it  our  business  to  know  all  the 
new  regulations  issued  by  the  Authorities. 


Estimates  Free — 

Town,  Country,  or  Abroad. 


CORRESPONDENCE  EN   TOUTES  LANGUES. 


Farrellize,  London." 

'Phone : 
7018  P.O.  Hampstead 


9,  Fleet  Road, 
Hampstead,  N.W. 

SPECIAL    TERMS    TO    RELIABLE    FIRMS. 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


No.    l.-THE    QUESTION    OF    SUNDAY    OPENING. 

WHAT     MR.     GEO.     R.     SIMS,     MR.     COULSON     KERNAHAN, 

ARCHDEACON     SINCLAIR,     PREBENDARY     CARLILE, 

AND     OTHERS     THINK. 

The  question  of  the  Sunday  opening  of  the  cinematograph  theatre  is  a  much-vexed  one  with  many  sections  of  the  public,  and  opinion  is  even 
divided  on  the  subject  among  showmen  themselves.     Some  are  for,  some  against;  some  on  religious  grounds,  some  as  a  matter  of  policy. 

The  views  of  representative  leaders  of  public  opinion  have  been  sought  by  the  Editor  of  The  Cinema,  and  appended  are  the  individual 
opinions  of  men  eminent  in  the  Church  and  Literature.  As  a  whole,  with  a  few  reservations,  the  writers  are  in  favour  of  rational  amusement 
for  the  people,  and  see  no  harm  in  Sunday  opening  provided  the  shows  are  carefully  selected  and  properly  controlled. 


MR.  GEO.  R.  SIMS, 

than  whom  no  leader  of  public  opinion  is  better  able  to  speak 
on  the  requirements  of  the  people,  since  as  playwright, 
journalist,  and  author  his  experience  is  unrivalled,  believes  in 
a  properly  directed  Sunday  picture  show  : 

My  view  as  to  the  desirability  or  undesirability  depends 
entirely  upon  the  class  of  picture  show.  Many  of  the  pictures 
now  exhibited  are  either  educationally  or  morally  sympathetic, 
or  object-lessons  in  the  human  gospel.  To  these  there  can  be  no 
possible  objection. 

I  do  not  think,  all  things  considered,  it  is  advisable  to  turn 
Sunday  into  a  day  of  comic  entertainment  or  of  unpleasant  sug- 
gestion. Sunday  is  largely  a  day  of  family  re-union  and  rest 
from  toil,  and  to  graver  minds  a  day  of  quiet  meditation  away 
from  the  calls  and  cares  of  business.  But  there  is  a  large  class 
who  want  on  Sunday  a  certain  amount  of  distraction,  and  no 
distraction  could  be  more  peaceful  or  in  accordance  with  the 
quiet  of  Sunday  than  the  properly  directed  picture  show  with  a 
wise  selection  of  films  for  the  Sunday  entertainment. 

MR.  COULSON  KERNAHAN, 

the  famous  novelist  and  writer  of  religious  allegories ,  whose 
works  enjoy  an  immense  popularity,  and  have  been  translated 
into  fourteen  languages,  believes  enormously  in  the  cinemato- 
'  graph  theatre,  but  pleads  for  a  religious  tone  in  the  Sunday 
show : 

The  matter  is  one  on  which  so  much  can  be  said  on  both  sides, 
and  on  which  it  is  so  easy  to  hurt  susceptibilities  which — if 
sincere — I  respect,  that  I  hesitate  to  offer  an  opinion. 

The  man  or  woman,  boy  or  girl,  who  thinks  it  wrong  to 
attend  other  than  a  place  of  worship  on  Sunday  should  un- 
doubtedly keep  away.  But  since  many  see  no  harm  in  it,  and 
since  (whether  one  approve  or  disapprove)  the  opening  of  places 
of  entertainment  on  Sunday  has  come,  and  apparently  to  stay, 
I  would  at  least  urge  that  Sunday  shows  should  be  not  only 
void  of  all  vulgarity,  but  should  be  serious  and  instructive. 

Personally,  I  believe  enormously  in  the  cinema  as  a  popular 
educator.  I  believe  that  it  would  be  quite  possible  to  have  some 
sort  of  religious  service  on  Sunday — scenes  from  the  Holy  Land 
as  it  is  to-day  and  in  the  time  of  our  Lord,  scenes  illustrating 
the  Bible  (Dore's  and  Tissot's  pictures,  for  instance),  the  lives 
of  the  martyrs,  great  religious  teachers  and  workers,  with 
hymns  thrown  on  the  screen,  in  the  singing  of  which  all  could 
join,  and  with  a  few  spoken  words  from  a  suitable  speaker 
J  describing  the  pictures  and  pointing  out  the  lessons  they  teach. 
Failing  that,  let  us  at  least  have  patriotism  and  loyalty  illus- 
trated on  the  screen,  with  instruction  in  science  and  natural 
history. 

I  am  not  for  the  introduction  of  the  Continental  Sunday  into 

I  England.     I  am  for  observing  one  day  of  the  week  for  rest,  for 

I  worship,  and  for  the  consideration  of  more  serious  matters,  but 

since  not  everyone  can  be  brought  to  think  as  I  think,  and  since 

facts  must  be  faced,  I  am  not  so  blind  and  so  bigoted  as  to  deny 

that  it  is  better  for  our  young  men  and  young  women  to  spend  a 

winter  evening  at  a  respectable    and    high-class    cinema    show 

'  than  in  prowling  the  streets  or  drinking  in  a  public-house.     But 

!  I   stand   out  for  all  absence  of  vulgarity,   and   I   plead    for  an 

■entertainment  that  will  appeal  to  the  best  side  of  human  nature 


and  to  the  imagination ;  an  entertainment  that  will  set  high 
ideals  of  life,  love,  duty,  citizenship,  loyalty,  and  patriotism 
before  the  public. 

ARCHDEACON  SINCLAIR 

considers  that  cinematograph  theatre  proprietors  should  be 
content  with  six  days'  opening,  and  reserve  Sunday  as  a  day  of 
rest  : 

In  my  opinion,  the  law  against  opening  places  of  amusement 
for  gain  on  Sunday  should  be  loyally  maintained.  The  various 
ways  by  which  concert  halls  and  shows  get  round  the  law  are, 
in  my  judgment,  unfair.  I  regard  the  day  of  rest  as  an 
enormous  and  incalculable  boon  to  the  working  classes,  and  that 
such  evasions  of  the  law,  however  plausible,  are  an  infringement 
of  its  sanctions.  Cinematograph  shows  are  often  very  delightful, 
but,  like  other  institutions,  whether  for  amusement  or  instruc- 
tion, they  would  be  acting  wisely  and  patriotically  in  being  con- 
tent with  six  days  in  the  week.  The  scheme  of  working  them  for 
charities  was  an  unhappy  idea,  as  it  makes  the  charities  connive 
at  the  defeat  of  the  purpose  of  the  law. 

PREBENDARY  CARLILE, 

founder  of  the  Church  Army,  thinks  Sunday  shows  are  very 
useful,   but  qualifies  this  statement  : 

I  believe  that  I  am  the  pioneer  of  Sunday  cinematographs. 
We  have  exhibited  films  in  my  Church  of  St.  Mary-at-Hill, 
Monument,  at  the  Sunday  evening  services  for  some  years,  and 
they  have  proved  to  be  a  vast  power  for  good.  I  therefore  say 
without  hesitation  that,  in  their  right  place,  Sunday  cinemato- 
graph shows  are  not  merely  innocent,  but  are  very  useful. 

But  I  must  qualify  this  expression  of  opinion  by  saying  that, 
in  my  judgment,  the  subjects  should  be  such  as  are  not  only 
harmless,  but  positively  of  an  instructive  and  elevating 
character,  such  as  Bible  scenes,  especially  scenes  from  the  life 
of  our  Lord.  They  must  also  be  exhibited  in  connection  with  a 
religious  service,  and  under  such  circumstances  as  to  remove 
any  fear  of  irreverence.  I  am  not  in  favour  of  the  opening  of 
ordinary  cinematograph  shows  on  Sundays,  especially  as  means 
of  profit. 

I  am  no  rigid  Sabbatarian,  but  I  feel  that  operators  and 
attendants  are  as  much  entitled  to  their  Sunday  rest  as  any- 
body else,  and  that  that  day  should  be  marked  off  from  others 
by  abstaining  from  mere  amusement.  I  am  sure,  however,  thdt 
there  is  a  very  great  future  for  Sunday  cinematograph  exhibi- 
tions on  the  lines  I  have  indicated  in  churches  and  mission 
halls,  and  possibly  also  in  other  public  halls  in  connection  with 
a  mission  service.  Our  forefathers  did  their  best,  by  means  of 
stained  glass  windows  and  the  like,  to  teach  the  truths  of 
religion  by  eye  as  well  as  by  ear.  There  is  no  reason  why,  with 
our  vastly  improved  appliances,  we  should  not  do  the  same. 
Church  Army  missioners  find  the  cinematograph  of  enormous 
use  in  connection  with  their  mission  preaching. 

THE  REV.  C.  H.  GRUNDY, 

says  the  cinematograph  theatre  is  infinitely  preferable  to  the 
gin  palace  : 

The  subject  of  Sunday  cinematograph  entertainments  is  es- 
sentially one  for  individual  rather  than  for  collective  decision. 
I  think  it  is  infinitely  the  wisest  course  for  the  clergy  to  state 


March,  1912.  THE     (CINEMA. 


"MONEY   TALKS." 

SO    DOES    THE 

VIVAPHONE 


Get  the 

VIVAPHONE 

Talking  on  the 

SCREEN 

and  the 

MONEY 

will  soon  be  Talking  in  the 

PAY  BOX. 


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CINEMATOGRAPHERS, 
2,    Denman    Street,    Piccadilly    Circus. 

Telegrams — "  Heptoic,  London."  Telephone  — Gerrard  2451. 


10 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912 


"CINEMA"    SYMPOSIUMS. 


THE  QUESTION  OF  SUNDAY  OPENING. 

(Continued.) 


general  principles,  and  not  to  give  detailed  advice  unless 
asked.  In  my  own  parish  I  never  give  an  opinion  on  such  a 
matter  if  I  can  avoid  it.  A  man  asks  me  if  it  is  right  to 
play  golf  on  Sunday-  I  reply  :  "  You  have  your  personal  idea 
as  to  how  best  Sunday  should  be  spent.  Rely  on  that,  and  on 
your  own   individual    conscience." 

There  are  many  earnest  communicants  of  the  Church  who 
regard  the  cinematograph  on  Sunday  as  no  violation  of  Lord's 
Day  observance.  The  clergyman  who  took  an  active  part  in 
the  closing  would  be  pointed  out  as  another  example  of  bigotry, 
and  his  conduct  would  not  increase  his  congregation.  Our  duty 
is  not  to  spend  our  time  in  opposing  things  which  may  not  be 
wrong  in  themselves.  Take  a  wet,  dismal  Sunday  in  London. 
There  are  many  quite  excellent  people  who  are  not  called 
religious,  do  not  go  to  church,  and  at  present  can  find  few 
innocent  places  to  go  to.  Their  choice  lies  between  staying  at 
home — and  you  cannot  reasonably  expect  people  living  in  a 
poor  house  in  a  back  street  to  stay  indoors  all  day — or  wander- 
ing about  getting  wet  or  going  into  a  public-house.  If  a  man 
of  this  type  wishes  to  take  his  wife  or  his  sweetheart  some- 
where, it  seems  to  me  that  the  cinematograph  show  is  infinitely 
preferable  to  the  gin  palace.  Clergymen  make  this  mistake  ; 
they  try  to  limit  the  amusements  of  people  who  are  not 
religious,  as  though  it  were  possible  to  compel  people  who 
differ  from  you  to  take  their  enjoyment  in  the  way  you  say  is 
best  for  their   souls. 

MR.  T.  C.  GARFIT, 
who  spoke  on   the  subject  of  Sunday   desecration  at   the   recent 
meeting  of  the  House  of  Laymen,  at  Canterbury,  declares  that 
matters  are  progressing  by  leaps  and  bounds: 

Under  the  London  County  Council  scheme  198  picture  palaces 
are  now  open  on  Sundays,  and  people  spend  £2,000  every 
Sunday  on  this  form  of  amusement.  The  desecration  of  Sunday 
is  going  on  by  leaps  and  bounds,  and  we  have  got  far  beyond 
the  opening  of  museums  and  picture  galleries.  In  these  hurly- 
burly  days  of  pleasure-seeking,  indifference,  apathy,  self- 
pleasing,   and   "don't-care,"  we  require  more  than  ever  a  day 


for  worship,  rest,  and  for  recreation  of  mind,  soul,  and  body, 
and  for  equipping  ourselves  better  for  the  work  of  the  week. 

THE  REV.  F.  B.  MEYER, 

the  well-known  Nonconformist  minister,  describes  the  cinematograph 
theatres  in  "  Answers  "  as  the  picture  galleries  of  the  poor. 

I  cannot  strenuously  object  to  cinematograph  shows  being 
opened  on  the  first  day  of  the  week,  because  they  employ  com- 
paratively little  Sunday  labour,  and  in  many  cases  the  sacred 
cause  of  charity  benefits  from  the  takings.  The  rich  man  has 
his  picture  galleries  on  Sundays ;  the  cinematograph  theatres 
are  the  picture  galleries  of  the  poor.  Personally,  I  should  like 
to  see  the  hours  during  which  the  shows  shall  be  opened  re- 
stricted to  from  6  p.m.  to  10  p.m.,  and  I  should  appeal  to  the 
good  feeling  of  the  proprietors  to  exhibit  a  class  of  pictures 
dealing  with  more  elevating  and  intellectual  subjects  than 
on  the  other  days  of  the  week. 

MR.  L.  HADEN  GUEST 

declares  himself  in  favour  of  Sunday  amusements  generally : 
I  am  in  favour  of  Sunday  amusements  properly  conducted. 
If  the  picture  theatre  shows  are  otherwise  suitable,  and  if  the 
labour  conditions  of  the  employees  of  the  theatres  are  fair  and 
reasonable,  I  should  be  in  favour  of  their  being  opened  on 
Sundays.  It  would  need  to  be  considered,  however,  at  what 
hours  and  for  how  long  hours,  and  I  should  guard  a  general 
assent,  if  I  were,  for  instance,  a  member  of  the  local  authority, 
by  retaining  power  to  close  in  exceptional  cases. 

MR.  H.  A.  SPOOR, 

London  representative  of  the  Essanay  Company,  considers 
many  pictures  as  good  as  sermons  : 

I  am  strongly  of  opinion  that  no  possible  harm  can  come  of 
opening   the  cinematograph   theatre  on   Sunday. 

In  England  you  have  a  good  class  of  film,  and  there  is  a 
natural  general  tendency  towards  a  clean  programme.  Many 
pictures  are  as  good  as  sermons,  and  I  am  sure  the  Churches 
will  not  suffer  in  the  long  run. 


No.  2.— THE  EXHIBITORS'    ASSOCIATION. 

WHAT  SOME  REPRESENTATIVE  SHOWMEN  THINK  OF    THE  NEW 

ORGANISATION. 

During  the  past  month  'he  Cinemitograph  exhibitors  have  formed  themselves  into  an  Association  for  the  protection  of  their  interests.     There 
seems  to  be  some  division  of  opinion  as  to  the  lines  upon  which  it  should  be  run.  and  we  give  with  pleasure  the  views  of  one  or  two  leading  men 
in  the  business,  though  we  do  not,  of  course,  identify  ourselves  in  any  way  with  the  views  expressed. 
MR.  L.  SCHLENTHEIM, 


chairman  and  managing  director  of  Palais  de  Luxe  Cinema 
Co..  Ltd.,  Roy  Cinema  de  Luxe  Co.,  Ltd.,  the  Birmingham 
Cinema  de  Luxe,  Ltd.,  and  Educational  and  Industrial  Films, 
Ltd.,  writes : 

United  we  stand,  divided  we  fall,  is  a  maxim  the  truth  of 
which  cinematograph  exhibitors  generally  do  not  seem  to  have 
realised  as  yet.  More  particularly  is  this  the  case  with  the  small 
exhibitor,  and  it  is  just  he  who  would  gain  most  from  a  strong 
association,  both  as  regards  protection  from  unjust  requirements 
by  local  authorities  and  from  the  imposition  of  unreasonable  con- 
tracts and  conditions  by  manufacturers  or  renters.  A  strong 
executive  committee  of  men  willing  to  work  has  been  formed, 
and  if  this  attempt  to  found  a  powerful  association  of  cine- 
matograph exhibitors  should  fail  it  will  be  solely  due  to  the 
indifference  of  the  individual  exhibitor,  and  it  will  be  he  who 
will  suffer  heavily  by  and  by. 

MR.  E.'m.   BARKER, 
Of  Euston  Picture  Palace,   Old  Kent  Road  Picture  Palace,  and 
I  1  dona  Put nre  Palace,  writes: 

I  think  it  a  matter  of  urgent  necessity  that  an  association  of 
exhibitors  should  be  formed.  I  do  not  see  the  red  rag  in  everv 
little  thing  that  crops  up.  For  instance,  I  find  County  Council 
requisitions  for  the  most  part  tend  to  the  good  of  the  picture 
theatre  and  that  if  any  are  difficult  or  costly  to  carry  out  they 
are  willing  to  accept  an  alternative,  and  sometimes  do  awav 
with  them  altogether.     With  regard  to  the  showman's  position 


towards  the  renters  and  manufacturers,  it  is  childish  to  think 
of  "  fighting."  Our  business  relationship  should  be  one  of 
absolute  amity.  The  honest  and  straightforward  showman  has 
nothing  to  fear,  and  therefore,  for  the  good  of  the  trade,  it 
should  be  his  pleasure  to  see  that  the  manufacturer's  rights  are 
not  infringed.  I  think  that  when  we  are  a  properly  organised 
body,  and  can  arrange  for  some  of  our  members  to  meet  members 
of  the  manufacturers'  and  renters'  associations,  we  shall  be  able 
to  overcome  all  petty  difficulties. 

MR.  A.  HARRIS, 

of  Broadway  Gardens,  Ltd.,  Walham  Green,  writes: 

All  we  can  say  in  the  matter  is  that  we  think  it  is  necessary 
that  an  association  be  formed  to  protect  the  interests  of  the 
trade,  so  that  the  views  of  the  trade  can  be  placed  before  the 
proper  authorities.  All  that  remains  is  to  see  that  the  authori- 
ties respect  those  views,  and  this  they  no  doubt  will  do  if  based 
upon  such  lines  as  will  enable  them  to  see  that  the  public  them- 
selves are  being  studied. 


As  the  attractiveness  of  the  moving  pictures  is  beyond 
question,  we  would  like  to  suggest  that  the  Saturday  afternoon 
shows,  so  largely  patronised  by  the  youngsters,  should  have 
their  programmes  specially  arranged  to  suit  the  youthful 
intelligence.  Fewer  of  frivolous  love-making  scenes  and  more 
pictures  of  travel,  natural  history,  &c,  on  these  special  occa- 
sions, would  be  welcomed  by  those  interested  in  the  develop- 
ment  of   the   youthful  mind. — Blackpool    Gazette. 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


li 


"  Whate'er  men  do,  or  say,  or  think,  or  dream, 
Our  motley  paper  seizes  for  its  theme." — Steele. 


T  happened  in  the  days  betore  the  advent 
of  the  cinematograph,  but,  for  all  that,  the 
story  has  never  got  into  print  before.  A 
lantern  service  for  children  was  being  held 
in  a  church  well  known  for  its  advanced 
teaching.  The  operator  put  one  of  the  slides  in  wrong 
side  up,  and  with  one  accord  eight  hundred  tiny  voices 
trolled,  "Old  John  Brown  is  upside  down."  The 
operator  hastened  to  right  matters. 

At  a  wedding  at  Clapham  Parish  Church  the  con- 
tracting parties  were  a  Mr.  Black  and  a  Miss  White, 
and  the  parson  was  named  Green.  They  ought  to  have 
been  Kinemacoloured. 

<•- 

The  long  arm  of  coincidence.  "  An  Old  Maid's 
Story  "  was  showing  at  a  certain  well-known  hall  re- 
cently, and  as  soon  as  the  title  was  thrown  on  the 
screen  an  elderly  lady  in  the  audience  walked  out  and 
asked  to  see  the  manager. 

What  she  said  to  that  worthy  I  don't  know,  but  the 
name  on  her  card  may  have  had  something  to  do  with 
her  attitude.  It  was  simply  inscribed  :  "  Miss  Hus- 
bands. " 

She  had  evidently  been  doing  that  all  her  life. 

The  play  picture  is  responsible  for  many  things.  It 
is  news  to  learn  that  it  was  one  of  the  chief  causes  of 
the  Chinese  revolution. 

<«- 

A  cutting  suggestion  :  Chop  !  Chop  ! 

(#- 

If  "  The  Fire  Screen  "  were  the  title  of  a  new  cinema 
film  we  should  all  say  it  was  grate  ! 


An  amusing  incident  happened  in  one  of  the  large 
photoplay  houses  in  Baltimore  recently.  A  comedy 
picture  was  being  presented  in  which  a  burglar  hides 
himself  in  a  clothes  closet  that  has  just  been  saturated 
with  camphor. 

The  odour  getting  in  his  nostrils  causes  him  to 
sneeze,  a  very  humorous  scene  in  itself,  but  when,  just 
at  the  third  sneeze,  the  film  broke,  and  the  machine 
automatically  shut  off  the  picture,  the  effect  was  most 
ludicrous,  for  it  gave  the  appearance  as  though  the  last 
sneeze  had  blown  out  the  light  in  the  machine  room, 
75  ft.  away. 


The  house  fairly  roared. 


A  small  provincial  town  council  was  discussing  the 
question  of  licensing  the  local  picturedrome,  and  it  had 
been  claimed  that  the  films  were  not  over  good.  The 
youngest  member  rose  to  his  feet  and  enthusiastically 
exclaimed  : 

"  Even  if  they  were  showing  no  films  at  all,  I  would 
still  go  there."     He  was  a  bachelor. 


"  I  have  a  grand  opening  for  a  picture  theatre,"  said 
the  promoter. 

"Why?"    queried  the  showman. 
'  There  is  a  big  home  for  deaf  mutes  in  the  town," 
replied  the  expert. 

The  Manufacturers'  Association — the  Renters'  Asso- 
ciation— the  Exhibitors'  Association. — The  Trinity. 


Is  it  that  this  is  the  one  in  three? 

The  three  in  one  seems  best  to  me. 

A   successful  method  of  friendly  practicability — 

Discuss   things   together   in   amicability. 

A  successful  meeting  at  the  Holborn  Restaurant. 
Subscription,  £1  is.  for  one  theatre;  10s.  6d.  each  one 
after  ;  limit,  ^3  3s.     Very  reasonable  ;  very  good. 


The  Darwin  magistrates  have  intimated  that  picture 
theatres  must  not  remain  in  semi-darkness  throughout 
the  entire  evening.     Why? 

<*- 

Settling  down  to  an  enjoyable  two  hours,  the  audi- 
ence at  a  Guernsey  picture  palace  were  surprised  to 
see  the  following  notice  flashed  on  the  screen  : 

The   operator   refuses   to   work   owing    to    his   not   having 
received  wages  fcr  the  last  two  weeks. 

The  indignant  proprietor  rushed  to  the  operating 
box,  and  after  a  wordy  encounter  tried  to  throw  the 
operator  downstairs.  But  the  audience  came  to  his 
assistance,  rescued  him,  and  insisted  that  he  should 
be  paid.  And  then,  victorious,  he  was  escorted  back 
to  his  machine,  says  the  Evening  News,  amid  the 
cheers  of  the  200  spectators,  who  settled  down  to  the 
proper  performance,  with  a  feeling  of  duty  well  and 
noblv   done. 

THE    WAG. 


12 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   igiz. 


P  REPUTATION 

5     IS    THE     FOUNDATION     OF     SUCCESS. 
BUILD    and   MAINTAIN   your    REPUTATION    by 
Programming       X*  /Q/S/Q/V\AXAA       Regularly. 


I 


Released 

Sunday, 

March  31st. 


BRONCHO     BILLY     AND     THE     SCHOOLMISTRESS. 

Another    Adventure    of    our   Versatile    Hero,    Broncho    Billy!      There    are    Sentiment, 
Excitement,  and  Thrills  in  this  splendidly  played  Photoplay. 


Approx. 
Length, 
994  Feet. 


R 


B 


I 


Released 
Thursday, 
April  4th. 


THE      BROTHERS      ERROR. 

This  Drama  portrays  a  Brother's  Jealousy  which  nearly  results  in  tragedy. 
See  the   Spectacular   Fire    Scenes   and  the   Rescue   from   the   Flames. 


Approx. 

Length, 

994  Feet. 


lo 


F 
E 
A 
T 
U 
R 
E 
S 


ESSANAY      PHOTOPLAYS      PRINTED      EXCLUSIVELY     ON      EASTMAN      STOCK. 


HA  QDAAD  ESSANAY  FILM  MANUFACTURING  CO.,       CAI  p     niQTDI  RITTAD 

•        •*"*■         \^MTKj\Jr%.3        5,    WARDOUR    STREET,    LONDON,  W.       OULfEr     1/lJlKlDU  IUKi 


Telephone :  City  2129. 


Telegrams:  "  Essatilm,  London.' 


Cablegrams:  "  Essanay,  London.' 


March.    1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


13 


(From    Our  Own  Correspondent.) 


NEW   YORK,  February  22nd. 


HE  Turkish-Italian  War  films  have  succeeded 
in  upsetting  the  Italian  Ambassador,  and 
he  has  been  making  the  bureaucrats  at 
Washington  sit  up  and  listen  to  his  moan. 
In  spite  of  his  protests,  we  are  still  a 
free   country. 

<*- 

Another  important  personage  who  has  been  stung  by 
our  enterprising  filmers  is  the  Governor  of  the  State 
of  Utah,  who  is  out  with  a  shot-gun  for  the  blood  of 
the  Great  Northern  Special  Feature  Film  Co.  The 
Governor  is  a  Mormon,  and  the  picture  he  mislikes 
is  a  film  called  "A  Victim  of  the  Mormons."  He 
hopes  to  have  the  exhibition  of  this  film  prohibited,  on 
the  grounds  that  it  is  not  a  true  representation  of 
Mormon  life. 

<«- 

Mr.  James  Devlin  has  started  a  school  of  Dramatic 
Photoplay  Acting  in  New  York.  His  object  is  to 
arrange  a  series  of  courses  to  teach  the  art  of  cinemato- 
graph acting,  and  he  has  arranged  with  several  big 
film  concerns  to  find  situations  for  his  pupils. 


In  this  cold  weather  it's  good  to  be  a  picture  artiste. 
Look  at  the  gaiety  and  the  sunshine.  The  Thanhouser 
people  are  producing  at  Tampa,  in  Florida ;  the  Vita- 
graph  at  Santa  Monaca  ;  and  another  stock  company 
is  at  Los  Angeles. 

<•- 

The  sanctity  of  the  White  House  has  now  been  en- 
hanced by  the  action  of  President  Taft.  He  consented 
to  be  cinematographed  in  the  full  exercise  of  his  power 
and  dignity  (as  well  as  his  clothes),  signing  the  last 
papers  admitting  the  State  of  Arizona  to  the  Union. 

Ciudad  Suarez  and  El  Paso  have  been  crowded  with 
■camera  men.  The  greasers  are  having  their  annual 
battle,  and  the  newspapers  are  out  for  blood.  A  good 
topical  film,  showing  the  execution  of  General  Chile 
con  Carne,  would  sell. 

<#- 

.  Pat  Dugan  is  having  a  number  of  rubber  neck 
wagons  brought  to  the  frontier.  If  Madero  and  Zapata 
have  a  little,  dust-up,  Pat  makes  $10  a  head  out  of  the 
tourists.      In   confidence,    it  is  rumoured    that  it   is  an 


ex-picture  producer  who  arranges  the  Mexican  battles 
— they  are  so  bloodless. 

Baseball  fans  are  going  to  get  an  animated  heaven 
if  Manager  Magee  has  his  way.  He  proposes  to  screen 
the  complete  game  the  same  evening  as  the  event,  all 
through  the  summer.  Bouncers  and  a  squad  of  .strong- 
arm  men  from  Mulberry-street  will  be  in  attendance 
to  prevent  too  much  excitement. 

A  tale  is  going  round  about  a  recent  train  wreck. 
The  United,  Limited,  left  the  rails,  tore  up  the  ties,  and 
went  into  the  ditch.  An  Englishman  was  travelling  in 
the  Pullman.  When  he  came  to,  he  found  the  operators 
well  on  the  job  taking  topicals  of  the  smash.  Going 
up  to  the  conductor  he  complained  bitterly  :  "  Very 
careless,  don't-cher-know.  Why  didn't  you  tell  me 
at  the  depot  that  it  was  a  cinematograph  special?  " 

The  Kalem  Company's  new  departure  of  announc- 
ing the  name  of  the  scenario  writer  is  pleasing  the 
potted  playwrights  no  end,  and  all  sorts  of  literary 
people  are  coming  in.  This  is  the  kind  of  stunt  that 
improves  the  standing  of  the  trade.  Good  for  Kalem 
Company  ! 

<♦- 

A  picture  heroine  in  a  well-known  company  gave  a 
dinner  at  Sherries  the  other  night,  in  order  to  cele- 
brate her  two  thousandth  proposal.  She  has  had  offers 
of  marriage  from  every  State  and  Territory  in  the 
Union,  and  has  vicarious  admirers  in  all  trades  and 
grades  of  society.  When  she  does  get  married  she 
is  going  to  have  the  event  filmed  and  sent  round,  so 
that  the  bunch  can   stop  pestering. 

<*■- 

Mr.  Charles  Urban,  of  Kinemacolor,  is  busy 
superintending  the  production  of  the  Durbar  films  at 
the  New  York,  on  Broadway,  and  from  what  I  hear 
the  American  branch  of  the  company  has  spent  up- 
wards of  $3,000  on   stage   settings  alone. 

The  show  promises  to  be  as 
big  a  success  this  side  as  it  is 
in  London,  and  with  such  gor- 
geous surroundings  the  films, 
will  draw  all  New  York. 


14 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


OF  THE  ^  \  *L.  .  , 


The    Non-Flam    Appeal The    Exhibitors'     Association Martial     Pictures. — National    Health      Week Dangerous 

Cinematography — The  "  Saturday  "  and  the  Cinema. 


The  Non-Flam  As  I  announced  last  month,  the  decision  of 
Appeal.  the  Folkestone  magistrates  on  the  ques- 
tion of  what  is  and  what  is  not  non-flam 
is  to  be  contested  in  the  High  Court.  To  enable  this  to 
be  done,  Mr.  Robert  Forsyth,  of  the  Victoria  Pier, 
Folkestone,  who  has  thus  far  borne  all  the  expense 
and  worry  in  connection  with  the  matter,  appeals  to 
the  Trade  for  assistance  in  defraying  the  expense  which 
an  appeal  will  incur.  We  trust  that  Mr.  Forsyth  will 
not  ask  in  vain  for  the  necessary  financial  support 
which  he  seeks.  The  question  of  what  is  and  what  is 
not  non-flam  is  one  which  affects  the  vital  interests  of 
the  cinematograph  industry,  and  Mr.  Forsyth's  spirited 
action  should  settle  the  question  once  and  for  all ;  other- 
wise it  means  that  it  will  be  illegal  for  anv  showman 
without  a  licence  to  display  pictures  in  a  building,  and 
that  according  to  the  authorities  there  is  no  non-flam  in 
existence.  Subscriptions,  big  and  small,  to  this  end 
should  be  sent  to  Mr.  Robert  Forsyth,  at  the  Victoria 
Pier,   Folkestone. 


The  The    Exhibitors   have  held   their   meeting 

Exhibitors'  and  formed  an  association,  and,  judging 
Association,  by  the  sentiments  expressed,  there  is 
every  probability  that  this  latest  organisa- 
tion will  perform  a  very  useful  service  all  round.  A 
strong  general  committee,  representative  in  every  sense 
of  the  word,  was  elected,  and  it  only  now  remains  for 
the  Exhibitors'  Association  of  Great  Britain  and  Ire- 
land to  get  to  work.  There  has  been  too  much  talk  in 
the  past  about  fighting  the  manufacturer  and  the  renter. 
Mr.  Jury  was  quite  right  when  he  said  at  the  meeting 
that  fighting  is  not  necessary.  Let  each  branch  of  the 
industry  look  after  its  own  interests  in  its  own  way,  and 
when  difficulties  and  differences  arise — as  they  are 
certain  to  do  from  time  to  time — the  best  thing  to  do  is 
to  arrange  a  meeting  between  the  representatives  of  the 
three  sections  and  talk  matters  over  in  an  amicable 
way.  Each  party  must  do  the  best  it  can  for  itself, 
always  remembering  that  at  the  finish  each  is  more  or 
less  dependent  upon  the  other.  I  understand  that 
applications  in  respect  of  140  halls  have  already  been 
received  by  Mr.  E.  J.  Muddle,  the  organising  secre- 
tary, whose  address  is  16,  Cecil  Court,  W.C.,  and 
it  would  be  as  well  to  once  again  remind  exhibitors 
that  the  subscription  has  been  fixed  at  £i  is.  for  the 
first  hall  and  10s.  for  each  additional  hall,  with  a  maxi- 
mum of  three  guineas. 


Martial  Why  not  utilise  the  cinematograph  as  a 
Pictures.  recruiting  agency  for  the  Army?  asks  an 
evening  contemporary.  The  question  has 
been  raised  by  an  announcement  to  the  effect  that  in  the 
United  States  the  Government  has  given  the  Lubin 
Company  the  use  of  a  regiment  of  cavalry  in  order  that 
the  young  men  of  the  country  who  see  the  pictures  may 
be  induced  to  enlist.  This  point  was  put  to  one  of  the 
head  officials  at  the  War  Office,  who  stated  that  the  idea 
would  certainly  be  adopted  if  it  was  found  that  the 
number  of  recruits  fell  off  to  any  large  extent.  So  far 
so  good,  but,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  I  believe  I  am  right  in 
saying  that  Mr.  West,  of  West's  Pictures,  did  this  very 
thing  some  years  ago,  with  the,  approval  of  the  authori- 
ties, and  as  an  incentive  to  recruiting  ;  at  least,  such  was 
stated  to  be  the  case,  and  the  result  was  so  gratifying 
that  we  are  under  the  impression  that  there  was  talk  of  a 
Government  subsidy  for  the  work. 


National  Mr.  Hugh  Codington,  Salisbury  House, 
Health  E.C.,  desires  to  bring  to  the  notice  of 
Week.  cinematograph  hall  proprietors  and  show- 
men the  movement  which  is  going  on  to 
organise  a  National  Health  Week  once  a  year.  The 
object  of  this  movement  is  to  focus  public  attention  on 
all  matters  connected  with  health,  hygiene,  sanitation, 
&c,  for  the  space  of  one  week  in  each  year,  so  as  to 
arouse  attention  to  health  even  among  the  most 
thoughtless  and  ignorant  members  of  the  community. 
An  organising  committee  has  been  formed,  having 
among  its  members  representatives  of  some  of  the 
leading  health  societies,  &c. ,  and  as  its  chairman  Pro- 
fessor Bostock  Hill,  president  of  the  Society  of 
Medical  Officers  of  Health  ;  and  the  committee  seeks  to . 
attain  its  object  by  means  of  demonstrations,  lectures, 
sermons,  exhibitions,  &c. ,  but,  most  valuable  of  all, 
by  popular  cinematograph  shows.  This  is  undoubtedly 
the  form  of  instruction,  mingled  with  entertainment, 
that  most  appeals  to  the  poorer  people,  and  Mr.  Cod- 
ington is  very  anxious  to  enlist  the  support  and  help 
of  hall  proprietors.  An  opportunity  will  thus  be 
afforded  of  showing  the  splendid  educational  and  in- 
structional value  of  cinematography.  April  28  has  been 
fixed  for  the  commencement  of  the  National  Health 
Week. 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


15 


HIGHEST   EXCELLENCE   IN 


MAGNIFICENT,  SUMPTUOUS  AND  ACCURATE  HISTORICAL 
HIGH  ART  FILMS,  DRAMAS  OF  INTENSE  INTEREST  REALLY 
HUMOROUS    COMICS,    PICTURESQUE     TRAVEL    SUBJECTS. 


PERFECT      PHOTOGRAPHY,        PERFECT     ACTING, 
AND      PERFECT     MISE     EN     SCENE.         !'•;.: 


Telegrams : 
ROSSIC1NES. 


•    t 


::    FILM    PRODUCTION.    :: 


Telephone : 

12912  CENTRAL. 


18,    CHARING     CROSS    ROAD,     W.C. 


COMPLETE 

THEATRE 

EQUIPMENTS 


THE    MOST    PERFECT 
BIOSCOPE     EXTANT. 


NEW    MODEL. 
ABSOLUTELY    FIREPROOF. 


Pictures  registered  while  the  machine  is  running 

or  stationary. 
Optical  Centre  remaining  constant. 
Light  increased  50  per  cent.     No  Supplementary 

rollers  to  break  films. 
Mechanism     unequalled     in     workmanship    or 

results. 


PERFECT. 


CATALOGUES    POST   FREE. 


'Grams:  "  Biojector,  London."  'Phone  :  Hop  1964 


R.  R.  BEARD, 

MANUFACTURER    OF 

Scientific  Instruments,  Optical  Lanterns,  Cinematographs, 
Jets,  Regulators,  Carriers,  &c, 

10,  TRAFALGAR  ROAD,  OLD  KENT  ROAD, 

LONDON,  S.E. 


16 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,  1912. 


THE     MONTHLY,.   REVIEW     (continued). 


Dangerous '  The  '  inhabitants  of  Fontainebleau  are 
Cinema-  protesting  against  some  of  the  uses  to 
tography.  which  the  picturesque  forest,  with  its 
huge  volcanic  boulders,  is  being  put  by 
some  of  the  cinematographic  companies.  There  was 
a  lion  hunt  with  a  real  lion  in  the  Forest  of  Fontaine- 
bleau a  few  days'  ago,  and  the-  people  who  litve  in  the 
[neighbourhood  think  that  freedom  iri*  trade  matters  is 
being  pushed  somewhat  too  far.  The  other  afternoon^ 
pear  the  Round  Point,  says  the  Express,  a  nurse  and 
children  were  terrified  at  the  sight  of  a  big  lion  with 
a  leg  of  mutton  in  its  jaws,  slinking  across  a  clearing. 
A  few  feet  away  was  a  horse,  tied  tp:a~tree  and  shriek- 
ing with  terror.  The  lion  sprang  atTthe  horse,  and  at 
this  moment  a  man  in^  cowboy  costume  appeared  on  the 
scene  and  shot  the  lion  dead. 


The  "Satur-  The  cinematograph  is  obtaining  recogni- 
|     day  "  and      tion     in     high     places.        The     Saturday 

the  Cinema.  Review  has  deigned  to  notice  the  exist- 
ence of  such  a  place  as  a  picture  palace, 
and  an  article  on  the  subject  from  Mr.  JFjlspn  Young 
xiakes  somewhat  amusing  reading.  After  a "  some- 
what senselessly)  superior  sneer  at  the  picture  palace, 
Mr.  Young  asks  if  this  is  to  be  the  theatre  of  the 
future.      ;<  We    have  almost    abolished  thinking    from 


our  theatres,"  he  says;  "  are  we  also  to  abolish  hear- 
ing and  seeing  in  any  except  one  dimension?  Perhaps 
the  greatest  evikof  the  kinematograph  craze  is  the 
evil  which  it  shares  with  the  pianola-player  and  the 
gramophone.  It  is  that  these  things  really  narrow  the! 
.life  and  experience  of  men.  They  bring  life  to  one's 
door ;  and  it  will  soon  be  possible  for  people  to  have 
all  the  adventurous1  experiences  -  they  ■  want  within  a 
radius  of  half-a-mile  of  their  own  house.  All  of  which 
is  bad,  and  means  loss  of  life  in  the  fullest  and  most 
serious  sense.  It  is  not  the  conquest  of  science,  but 
the  abuse  of  Science." 


Kinemacolour.  These  ane  gala  times  at  the  Scala,  and, 
hundreds v  of  intending  visitors  to  the 
Coronation  Durbar,  via  "Kinemacolour,"  who  have 
neglected  to  book  seats  beforehand  arc  crowded  out  at 
every  performance.  Mr.  Urban  has  compressed  with! 
such  Spartan  severity  the  pictorial  record  of  his  three 
weeks  "  With!  Our  .King  and  Queen  Through  India,"; 
that  the  entire  pa- 
geant, originally  di- 
vided into  two  parts, 
is  now  shown  at 
every  performance. 


DRAMATIC    MOTION    AND    THE    CHILD. 

By  "MEZCAL." 


MOST  children  are  instinctively  dramatic ;  this 
instinct  of  imitation  is'  their  attempt  to  re- 
produce action,  to  visualise  their  ideas  and 
imagination,  and  to  bring  them  into  actual 
life. 

All  the  games  of  childhood  are  founded  upon  it,  and 
it  is  the  basis  of  most  modern  schools  of  elementary 
education.  As  the  child  grows,  lessons  become  less 
dramatic,  they  become  dry  book  subjects,  and  have  less 
power   over  the  imagination. 

The  cinematograph  is  now  to  be  found  in  every  little 
town  and  village,  and  its  educational  aspect  is  enor- 
mous. What  the  children  like  is  the  vivid  movement, 
the  free  play  of  emotions  and  'gestures  that  they  can 
readily  understand,  and  a  wordless  cinematograph  play 
creates  a  deeper  mental  impression  on  the  children's 
mind  than  the  same  play  in  an  ordinary  theatre.  From 
the  evolution  of  the  film  from  its  first  reproductions — 
express  brains,  army  manoeuvres — mere  phases  of 
active  motion — we  have  now  evolved  the  story  pictures, 
the  definite  dramatic  motion. 

Every  type  of  emotion  is  displayed  in  the  pictures, 
and  the  result  is  that  the  normal  child  of,  say,  twelve 
or  thirteen  years  of  age,  and  who  is  a  modest  patron 
of  the  picture  theatre,  is  being  slowly  educated  in 
dramatic  art.  The  public  taste  in  their  choice  of  sub- 
jects has  therefore  become  the  ruling  factor  in  the 
education  of  the  child.     „, 

Humanity  demands  emotion,  and'Xve  must  now  con- 
sider the  effect  of  a  saturation  in  these  emotions  upon 
the  juvenile  mind. 


As  through  the  agency  of  the  picture  show  a  series 
of  emotions  can  be  rapidly  produced  and  a's  rapidly 
assimilated,  will  the  result  be  a  mind  incapable  of  ..dis- 
crimination, incapable  of  judging  between  the  real  and 
the  false  emotion,  a  curiously  callous,  shallow,  in- 
human product,  or  will  the,  other  extreme  be  reached, 
and  give  us  a  generation.'  whose  minds  are  greatly 
developed  and  whose  dramatic  sensibilities  are 
quickened  in  their  real  appreciation  of  true  art  and 
beauty  ? 

This  to  a  large  extent  depends  upon  the  speed  with 
which  the  public  taste  improves.  It  cannot  have  a  good 
effect' uponv  the  childish  intellect  to  see  continual  melo- 
drama, 'suicide,  and  sudden  death  !  It  is  true  that  the 
morality  of  the  usual  film  is  correct — that  is  to  say,  that 
virtue  triumphs  and  vice  is  duly  crushed  ;  but  is  any 
form  of  violent  emotion  of  the  sensational  type  good  for 
the  childish  mind  ? 

The  manager  of  the  cinema  theatre  is  the  responsible 
man  for  the  selection  of  the  films,  and  in  him  -lies  the 
possibility  of  educating  the  public.  It  is  not  possible 
to  satisfy  our  present-day  public  with  a  programme  that 
would  delight  a  higher  intellectual  type,  but  it  is  pos- 
sible to  avoid  the  crude,  the  careless,  and  the  cynical. 

To  stiffen1  the  hair  of  a  provincial  audience  with 
horror,  to  draw  a  low  type  of  intellect  to  a  heavy  meal 
of  sickly  sentiment  and  oharnel  deathbed  scenes  is 
not  the  whole  art  of  management.  ;  A  carefully  chosen 
artistic  programme  will  pay  you  better  in  the  end,  and 
your  burddn  of  responsibility  to  the  youth  of  the  nation 
is  heavy.,.. but  worth  thinking  over. 


Supplement  to   "The  Cinema,"  March,  1912. 


MARCH,     1912. 


"THE  CINEMA"  critics  attend  the  leading  film  demonstrations,  and  all  films  reviewed  in  this 
Supplement  have  been  selected  from  the  various  programmes  of  releases  for  the 
ensuing  month. 

EXHIBITORS     CAN     RELY     UPON     "THE     CINEMA"      FILM     SELECTION     AS     BEING    THE     PICK 

OF     THE     MARKET. 


A.B. 


M.P.  Sales  Co.,  Wardocr  Street. 


"  BILLY'S  STRATAGEM."— Released  March  28th.  Length 
•998  feet.      Indian  Drama. 

A  thriller,  and  one  that  is  sure  to  be  popular  with  all  sections  of 
the  audience.  The  children  are  left  at  home  with  grandad  in 
the  cabin  while  the  family  go  off  to  the  settlement.  An  unscrupu- 
lous trader  lets  the  Indians  have  whiskey,  and  wild  with  it  and  in 
hope  of  finding  more  they  attack  the  cabin.  Grandad  is  killed  and 
the  children  are  in  a  tight  corner,  when  Billy  hits  on  the  stratagem 
of  upsetting  the  powder  keg  in  the  kitchen  and  setting  a  slow 
match  to  it  while  they  escape  through  a  window.  The  Redskins 
enter  the  kitchen  just  as  the  powder  explodes  ! 

"THE  AWAKENING."  — Released  March  28th.  Length 
691  feet.     Dramatic  Comedy. 

An  amusing  film  in  which  a  tall  Major  is  married  to  a  little 
Spanish  girl  about  half  his  size.  He  only  consents  to  the  marriage 
to  avoid  being  disinherited.  The  film  portrays  the  loveless  honey- 
moon and  the  gradual  awakening  of  love  in  the  husband's  breast, 
culminating  when  he  finds  his  wife  picking  roses  in  the  garden, 
and  she  falls  off  a  ladder  right  into  his  arms.  Cupid  is  always 
present  in  this  film. 


AMERICAN    CO., 

ioi,  YV'ardour  Street,  W. 


"THE    RELENTLESS 

16th.     Length  972  feet. 


LAW.  "—Drama. 


Released    March 


$TO 

E| 

MTft"1"^*^                                                                                                                           '^^W 

■ 

A  powerful  drama  of  the  virgin  West.  Holds  one  enthralled  from 
first  to  last.  It  is  the  story  of  an  escaped  convict  who  visits  his 
home,  where  a  touching  scene  is  enacted  between  parents  and 
child.  Hunted,  bleeding,  and  famished,  he  has  to  flee  again  as 
the  sheriff  and  his  men  are  after  him.  We  see  an  exciting  chase 
over  hill  and  dale,  and  the  final  entrenchment  of  the  escaping  man 
in  a  mountain  cave.  For  two  days  he  holds  the  minions  of  the 
law  at  bay,  and  then,  driven  mad  by  the  cravings  of  hunger, 
surrenders.     A  fine  film,  excellently  produced,  and  full  of  thrills. 


CLARENDON, 

12,    Charing    Cross    Road,    W.C. 


"AT  THE  HOUR  OF  THREE."— Drama.  Released  March 
10th.     Length  875  feet. 

A  story  entirely  out  of  the  common,  and  possessing  at  least  one 
quite  novel  feature  which  should  ensure  for  it  a  very  warm  reception 
in  any  programme.  A  tale  of  a  reckless,  spendthrift  son,  whoj  be- 
coming engaged  to  a  charming  girl,  pulls  up  sharp  in  his  course  of 
extravagance.  He  pleads  with  his  father  for  money  with  which  to  pay 
his  debts,  but  the  latter  refuses  point  blank  to  help  him.  An  angry 
scene  ensues  ;  the  son  pulls  out  his  revolver  and  threatens  suicide. 
The  father  after  a  struggle  succeeds  in  wresting  the  Weapon  from 
the  demented  man,  and  rings  the  bell  for  the  butler  to  show  his 
son — the  door.  Left  alone,  he  picks  up  the  revolver  to  examine  it, 
and  accidentally  shoots  himself,  the  bullet  subsequently  shattering] 
the  face  of  a  grandfather  clock,  and  stopping  it  at  the  hour  of  three.! 
Meanwhile  the  son,  wandering  about  the  streets,  not  knowing! 
what  he  is  doing,  stops  and  watches  a  cinematograph  opera  tori 
taking  pictures  of  a  company  of  boy  scouts  drilling  outside  a  big! 
building  where  the  clock  points  to  the  hour  of  three.  Subsequently! 
he  is  arrested  on  a  charge  of  murdering  his  father.     On  the  day  afl 


a  girl  alone"  (Hepwix). 


TILLY    AND   THE    DOGS''    (HepXi-ix). 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


March,  1912. 


the  trial  his  fiancee's  little  sister  goes  to  a  picture  theatre  and  sees 
the  very  film  which  Dick  had  seen  taken.  There  he  stands,  and 
the  clock  in  the  background  pointing  to  the  hour  of  his  father's 
supposed  murder,  eventually  establishes  his  innocence  in  a  crowded 
and  most  effective  court  scene.  One  of  the  strongest  pictures  of 
its  kind  that  any  Manager  could  wish  to  include  in  his  programme. 


CRICKS  &  MARTIN, 

101,  Wardolr  Street,  W, 


"WHILE  THE  COOK  SLEPT."  Released  March  7th. 
Comic.     Length,  425  feet. 

One  of  the  finest  trick  films  the  Trade  has  recently  seen.  A 
dinner  cooks  itself,  while  the  meat  commits  suicide  against  the 
knife  blade,  and  potatoes  solemnly  peel  themselves,  until  one  feels 
a  little  doubtful  of  one's  sobriety — it  is  all  so  mystifying. 

"THE  STOLEN  VIOLIN."— Released  March  14th.  Length, 
520  feet.     Drama. 

A  good,  pathetic  film  with  a  happy  ending.  It  is  a  story  of  a 
poor  musician,  whose  one  support  for  his  starving  family  is  his 
violin.  Faint  with  hunger  he  falls,  and  a  loafer  steals  the  violin 
and  leaves  him  destitute.  Driven  to  despair  he  breaks  into  a  large 
house  to  find  food,  but  finds  his  violin.  Forgetting  where  he  is, 
he  starts  to  play  it  instead.  The  owner  of  the  house  enters,  and 
hearing  his  story,  accompanies  him  home  and  relieves  his  distress. 


sheriff  and  his  men.  She  gives  her  word  of  honour  that  Frank  is 
not  there,  and  the  man  departs.  As  soon  as  his  back  is  turned 
Shaw  fires  and  the  girl  upbraids  him.  "  I  lied  to  him  to  save  you," 
she  says,  "and  you  shot  him  in  the  back."  Shaw  escapes,  and 
Edna  nurses  the  deputy  back  to  health.  The  story  ends  with  the 
hint  of  a  love  affair  between  the  two — a  strong  feature  film  in  any 
programme. 

"BRONCHO  BILLY  AND  THE  SCHOOLMISTRESS."— 
Drama.     Released  March  31st.     Length  994  feet. 

The  story  of  a  practical  joke  that  worked  the  wrong  way,  and 
has  all  the  elements  of  a  strong  drama,  as  well  as  a  love  interest 
which  will  commend  it  to  the  audience, which  always  enjoys  healthy 
sentiment. 

"TRACKED     DOWN."— Drama.  Released     April     18th. 

Length,  990  feet. 

A  real  top-liner  of  exceptional  merit,  which  sustains  the  interest 
from  first  to  last.  Jim  Ford,  a  notorious  swindler,  escapes  after 
arrest,  and  the  larger  part  of  the  story  is  occupied  with  the  adven- 
tures of  Walters,  a  typical  detective,  who  eventually  tracks  him 
down.  Ford,  posing  as  an  Englishman,  gains  access  to  the  home  of 
a  wealthy  family,  whom  he  robs.  Walters  recognises  him,  gains 
access  to  the  house,  is  overcome  by  the  thief  and  his  accomplices, 
and  finally,  after  a  most  sensational  pursuit,  the  criminals  are 
caught.  A  story  full  of  breathless  interest,  and  a  sure  draw.  One 
of  Essanav's  best. 


ESSANAY. 

5,  Wardolr  Street,  W. 

GAUMONT  CO., 

5-6,  Sherwood   Street,  W. 


"THE  DEPUTY  AND  THE  GIRL."— Drama.  Released 
April  11th.     Length,  996  feet. 

A  good  strong  Western  drama,  full  of  exciting  incident.  Jim 
Black's  daughter  Edna  is  engaged  to  Frank  Shaw.  She  suspects 
her  father  and  lover  of  shady  dealings.  They  rob  the  stage-coach; 
Jim  is  finally  caught,  and  Shaw  is  traced  to  the  girl's  house  by  the 


THE  deputy  AND  theIgirl  "   (Essanay). 


"THE  PRISON  ON  THE  CLIFF."— Released  March  31st. 
Drama.     Length,  1,800  feet. 

A  tale  of  the  year  1796,  and  a  splendid  picture  of  the  rugged 
fortress  of  Roucras,  on  the  rocky  cliffs  of  the  Bay  of  Gascony, 
close  to  the  Spanish  frontier.  An  imprisoned  aristocrat,  the 
Marques  de  Fiers,  an  old  friend  of  the  prison  Governor's,  is  seen 
on  friendly  terms  with  the  latter's  young  and  pretty  wife.  Feelings 
of  jealousy    being  aroused    in  the  official  breast,   the    Governor 

arranges  ostensibly  to 
help  the  Marquis  to 
escape  from  his  cell  by 
giving  him  a  file  and  a 
long  rope.  In  reality 
he  knows  the  rope  is 
not  nearly  long  enough 
to  enable  the  young 
aristocrat  to  reach  the 
ground,  and  that  he  will 
in  all  probability  be 
killed.  We  see  him 
working  frantically  at 
the  iron  bars  in  his  cell, 
which  finally  yield  to 
his  endeavours.  He 
passes  through  the  win- 
dow, and  begins  to 
lower  himself  slowly 
down  the  rope.  Hun- 
dreds of  feet  below  the 
angry  waves  are  roaring 
out  defiance,  and  the 
prisoner  shivers  as  he 
looks  down.  As  we  see 
him  suspended  in  mid- 
air by  a  frail  rope  a 
thrill  of  excitement 
passes  over  us,  and 
holds  us  spellbound. 
Lower  and  lower  he 
goes  only  to  discover 
too  late  that  the  rope  is 
not  long  enough.  We 
see  his  frantic  endeav- 
ours to  retrace  his  way. 
Finally,  his  strength  be- 
ing unequal  to  the  task 
he  loosens  his  hold,  and 
slides  down  the  face  of 


March,  1912. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


111. 


the  tower  on  to  the  rocks  below,  where  he  lies  bruised,  bleeding, 
and  unconscious.  On  coming  to  he  has  a  terrible  race  with  the 
incoming  tide,  but  eventually  reaches  safety  ;  and  the  Governor, 
meanwhile,  having  received  orders  to  release  his  prisoner,  all  ends 
happily.     A  feature  film,  worthy  top  place  on  the  bill. 


HEPWIX, 

2,  Denman  Street,  W. 


"A  GIRL  ALONE."— Released  March  14th.  Drama.  Length, 
1,025  feet. 

A  heart  story  which  reminds  one  of  the  good  old  days  of  Adelphi 
drama,  when  hero  and  villain  in  turn  occupied  the  stage,  and  the 
heroine  was  the  darling  of  the  "gods."  Here  we  have  a  tale  of 
heartless  villainy  gradually  unfolded  which  would  cause  the  gallery 
boys  to  almost  lift  the  roof.  It  is  splendidly  told  too,  and  the 
trials  of  the  heroine  raise  a  sympathetic  lump  in  the  throat  as  one 
sees  her  in  the  hands  of  the  unprincipled  villain,  who,  after 
winning  her  affections,  goes  through  a  mock  marriage  with  her, 
and  then  in  a  few  months,  tiring  of  his  new  toy,  casts  her  adrift. 
"A  girl  alone  "  she  now  is  in  very  truth,  and  wandering  the 
streets  she  sinks  down  unconscious  under  shelter  of  a  railway  arch. 
Here  she  is  found  by  her  former  lover,  a  policeman,  who  takes  her 
to  his  mother's  home,  where  he  learns  of  the  heartless  treatment 
she  has  received  from  the  scoundrel  who  had  promised  to  befriend 
her.  He  makes  up  his  mind  to  be  avenged  ;  visits  the  villain  in 
his  rooms,  where  a  most  exciting  struggle  between  the  two  takes 
place  ;  the  policeman  administers  a  well-deserved  thrashing  to  the 
girl's  betrayer,  and  then  returns  and  tells  her  of  his  love.  She 
accepts  him,  and  all  ends  happily.  A  film  which  would  make  a 
strong  feature  in  any  programme. 

"TILLY  AND  THE  DOGS."— Released  March  28th.  Comic. 
Length,  500  feet. 

A  film  which  will  keep  the  audience  in  roars  of  laughter.  Every- 
one is  familiar  with  the  mischievous  pranks  of  the  Tilly  girls,  and 
here  we  have  them  at  their  best.  Their  uncle,  away  from  home 
for  some  time,  sends  them  two  enormous  dogs  to  protect  them 
during  his  absence.  The  arrival  of  the  dogs  is  the  signal  for 
general  confusion.  The  girls'  governess  flies  to  her  room  pursued 
by  the  two  animals  ;  the  tax  collector  is  the  next  person  to  receive 
attention,  and  finally  the  governess  jumps  from  the  window  and 
lands  in  a  strawberry  bed,  and  the  tax  collector  has  a  cold  bath  in 
the  water-butt.  Meanwhile,  the  two  tomboys  have  settled  down 
to  write  uncle  a  letter  in  which  they  thank  him  for  "  the  nice  dogs, 
which  are  so  quiet." 


IMP, 


Brockliss,  4,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


"EXECUTIVE  CLEMENCY."— Released  February  29th. 
Drama.     Length  990  feet. 

A  heart  story  which  cannot  fail  to  hold  the  interest  of  any  audience . 
A  real  top  liner.  A  young  mechanic  is  ill,  and  his  wife  is  insulted 
by  the  rent  collector.  The  husband  administers  a  well-deserved 
chastisement,  and  is  convicted  of  felonious  assault.  Whilst  in  prison 
his  wife  gives  birth  to  their  first  child.  Learning  the  news  he  longs 
to  escape.  He  succeeds,  goes  home,  sees  his  wife  and  little  one, 
and  then  returns  to  prison  to  serve  out  his  sentence.  The  incident 
gets  into  the  papers,  and  the  governor's  daughter  pleads  success- 
fully with  her  father  to  pardon  him  on  Thanksgiving  Day.  There 
is  a  touching  scene  of  reunion,  and  curtain.  The  story  is  full  of 
powerful  incident,  and  worthy  of  aprominentplace  in  any  programme. 


SELIG. 


"THE  BANDIT'S  MASK."— Released  March  28th.  Length, 
1,000  feet. 

A  good  Mexican  Border  film  is  seldom  seen,  but  this  one  is 
excellent,  natural  and  free  from  horrors.  The  plot  is  simple,  but 
leads  up  to  a  dramatic  denouement.  A  bandit's  mask  is  found  by 
Lieut.  Rogers  and  at  a  ranch  where  he  stops  for  refreshment  he 
tells  the  story  of  his  finding  the  mask  to  the  little  Senorita,  thus 
rousing  the  jealousy  of  her  lover,  Juan,  who,  on  receiving  news  of 
a  robbery  and  remembering  Rogers'  mask,  sets  out  to  capture  and 
hang  him.  The  Senorita  Anita  gives  him  shelter,  and  sends  the 
lynchers  off  on  a  false  scent,  but  they  return  and  Rogers  is  dis- 


covered and  is  about  to  be  hanged  when  another  party  turn  up 
with  the  real  bandit,  and  all  goes  well.  It  is  a  good  stirring  film 
and  perfect  as  regards  local  colour  and  costume. 

"TWO  OLD  PALS."  —  Comedy.  Released  March  31st. 
Length,   1,012  feet. 

In  this  picture,  "Toddles,"  the  Selig  elephant,  is  at  her  best, 
and  is  sure  to  get  rounds  of  applause.  Big  Otto's  Circus,  which 
has  been  losing  money  along  the  route,  is  arrested  and  held  for  bond 
at  a  small  town.  At  night,  Big  Otto  and  Toddles,  his  pet  elephant, 
escape  and  have  a  most  amusing  series  of  adventures  on  tramp 
together,  finally  arriving  at  a  town  where  another  circus  is  showing 
and  where  they  both  find  employment.  The  wonderful  sagacity 
of  the  elephant,  with  its  almost  human  intelligence  in  guarding 
its  master  and  helping  him,  make  the  film  a  certain  favourite. 


URBANORA, 

,   91,    Wardour    Street,    W. 


"  PLAYING  TRUANT."— Released  March  27th.  Length, 
380  feet.     Drama. 

A  child  and  dog  film  that,  though  short,  is  a  perfectly  exquisite 
little  episode. 

"  LA  CIGALE."— Released  March  27th.     Length,  995  feet. 

A  strong  human  interest  drama,  and  very  pathetic  without  being 
sentimental  in  its  setting.  La  Cigale,  a  street  singer,  is  noticed  by 
an  artist,  who  paints  a  splendid  portrait  of  her.  While  in  the 
studio  a  friend  of  the  artist  finds  that  La  Cigale  has  a  splendid 
voice,  and  Sylvester,  the  artist,  pays  to  have  her  trained.  The 
day  she  becomes  a  great  prima  donna  she  wishes  to  destroy  all 
traces  of  her  past  life  in  the  gutter,  and  her  anger  is  roused  by 
Sylvester's  portrait  of  her  in  her  old  garb.  In  an  access  of  rage 
she  destroys  it.  Sylvester  is  mad  when  he  finds  the  work 
destroyed,  and  slowly  loses  interest  in  the  world.  His  friends 
organise  a  benefit  concert  on  his  behalf,  at  which  La  Cigale  sings. 
Whilst  singing  she  has  a  vision  of  the  poor  old  artist  in  his  misery, 
and  is  led  fainting  from  the  stage.  Remorse  stricken,  she  hurries 
off  to  Sylvester's  studio,  where  he  is  dying.  She  realises  that  he 
does  not  recognise  her,  and  she  resumes  the  dress  of  the  street 
singer,  and  sings  and  dances  before  him,  thus  easing  the  old  man's- 
path — to  death. 


VITAGRAPH. 


"THE  MEETING  OF  THE  WAYS."— Released  April  4th. 
Length,  1,013  feet. 

A  good  dramatic  film  with  a  happy  ending.  It  is  so  good  that 
it  holds  one's  attention  right  through,  and  it  is  almost  a  personal 
disappointment  when  the  reel  finishes. 

"HOW  TOMMY  SAVED  HIS  FATHER."— Released 
April  6th.     Length  912  feet. 

A  splendid  little  episode  of  the  Civil  War.  Kenneth  Casey  in 
the  part  of  Tommy  Barton,  the  hero,  is  absolutely  splendid  as  a 
child  actor,  and  the  vivid  setting  of  the  story  amidst  the  uniforms 
and  romantic  dresses  of  the  Civil  War  period  makes  a  beautiful 
story.  Tommy  is  playing  at  soldiers  with  some  little  friends  and 
their  coloured  nurse  when  his  father,  General  Barton,  returns 
wounded  and  falls  off  his  horse.  Tommy  hides  his  father  in  the 
bushes,  starts  the  horse  down  the  road  and  misleads  the  Federal 
soldiers,  who  are  in  pursuit.  He  takes  his  father  to  a  cave  and 
the  pair  have  many  narrow  escapes  upon  the  way,  but  thanks  to 
Tommy's  shrewdness  and  wit  the  wounded  officer  escapes  and  is 
safely  hidden  where  he  can  be  attended  to  by  his  wife  and  family. 
The  whole  work  of  the  piece  devolves  on  Tommy,  and  his  success 
makes  of  it  a  very  charming  film. 


KINETO,  LTD., 

80-2,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


"CAIRO,  THE  MOSLEM  CENTRE  OF  AFRICA.'— 
Released  March  14th.     Length,  420  feet. 

A  fine  travel  film,  giving  some  wonderful  pictures  of  life  in 
cosmopolitan  Cairo,  among  them  the  procession  of  the  Sacred 
Carpet  on  the  birthday  of  Mahomet  ;  a  review  of  Egyptian  troops 
by  the  Khedive  ;  a  fine  view  of  Mount  Mokattam,  and  a  remark- 
ably effective  picture  of  an  Egyptian  sunset. 


IV. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


March,  1912. 


"THE    RETURN.      THE    COW-GIRL   OR    THE    LADY?  "    (Rex) 

"A  DAY  IN  THE  LIFE  OF  A  COAL  MINER."— Topical. 
Length,  595  feet. 

In  view  of  the  threatened  coal  strike,  Kineto,  Ltd.,  is  re-issuing 
this  interesting  film. 

"  EGYPT  :  THE  NILE  AND  PYRAMIDS."— Released  March 
7th.     Travel.     Length,  390  feet. 

Another  splendid  travel  film  depicting  life  on  the  Nile,  and  some 
admirable  pictures  of  the  Pyramids  and  the  Sphinx.  Worthy  of 
inclusion  in  any  programme. 

"BATTLESHIPS  AND  SUBMARINE  MANOEUVRES."— 
Length,  370  feet. 

A  striking  picture  of  naval  tactics,  showing  the  sinking  and 
reappearance  of  submarines,  and  the  firing  of  torpedoes. 


a  good  deal.  Produced  in  colour,  we  have  a  wonderful 
imaginative  picture  of  a  voyage  to  the  Pole  in  a  remark- 
able aeroplane-bus.  A  most  amusing  interlude  is  pro- 
vided by  a  suffragette  disturbance.  There  is  a  terrific 
race  between  hundreds  of  aeroplanes,  collisions  with 
occasional  comets  and  minor  planets,  a  passing  visit  to 
the  signs  of  the  Zodiac,  and  the  eventual  arrival  in  Arctic 
regions,  where  the  mystery  of  the  Pole  is  discovered  in 
the  person  of  the  Giant  of  the  Snows,  a  weird  creature 
of  mammoth  proportions,  who  rises  from  the  depths  and 
seizes  the  intrepid  adventurers  in  his  maw.  The  magnetic 
Pole  is  discovered,  and  finally  the  leader  of  the  expedition 
again  reaches  France  in  safety,  where  he  is  banqueted  by 
the  Aeronautic  Club.  A  feature  film  that  will  make 
your  audiences  talk. 

"IN  THE  GROCERY  BUSINESS."  —  Released 
March  20th.     Comic.     Length,  396  feet. 

Humorous  adventures  of  a  young  man  new  to  the 
business.     A  laugh  from  start  to  finish. 

"LOVE  IN  MANY  MOODS."— Released  March 
23rd.     Length,  840  feet. 

A  dainty  and  charming  love  story  told  in  delightful 
coloured  pictures,  in  a  number  of  beautiful  scenes, 
before  each  of  which  a  tiny  cupid  appears  to  indicate  the 
Mood  of  Love.  Beautiful  in  its  artistic  construction, 
this  is  a  film  which  should  find  a  place  in  every  well- 
varied  programme. 


REX, 

Brockless,  4,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


LUBIN, 


M.  P.  Sales  Co.,  86,  Wardour  Street. 


"LOVE  v.  STRATEGY."— Released  March  24th.  Length, 
1,011  feet.     Drama. 

A  good  love  story,  with  an  excellent  hero  and  heroine,  dealing 
with  the  villainous  attempt  of  a  rival  to  secure  a  contract  in  business 
and  a  life  contract  in  love  at  one  and  the  same  time.  The  heroine 
discovers  the  plot  and  releases  her  lover  in  time  for  him  to  secure 
the  contract  thus,  foiling  the  villain  from  securing  the  girl  and  the 
business. 

"TRICKED  INTO  HAPPINESS."  —  Released 
March  28th.     Length,  1,011  feet.     Drama. 

A  strong  drama  hingeing  on  the  fact  of  an  accident 
depriving  the  hero  of  his  sight.  On  hearing  this 
Mildred  Mason,  the  office  stenographer,  to  whom  he  is 
engaged,  leaves  him  for  another  man  ;  but  her  sister 
Jane,  who  is  nursing  him,  marries  him  instead — he 
imagining  her  to  be  Mildred.  After  a  year  the  doctors 
think  that  an  operation  will  restore  his  sight,  and  a 
specialist  performs  the  operation.  As  the  bandage  is 
taken  off,  Mildred,  who  has  left  her  husband,  rushes  in, 
and  he,  taking  her  for  his  wife,  embraces  her.  But  her 
mother  explains  the  situation,  and  the  hero  realises  the 
true  worth  of  Jane — the  woman  he  has  really  married. 
A  powerful  film,  with  a  strong  denouement,  and  very 
well  acted. 


"THE  LOGGING  INDUSTRY."— Released  March  30th. 
Length,  569  feet. 

One  of  the  finest  industrial  films  we  have  seen  for  some  time. 
Gives  a  wonderful  picture  of  the  men  engaged  in  felling  the  giant 
denisons  of  the  great  primaeval  forests  in  the  Far  West.  Has  a 
highly  educative  value.  .        _" 

•'THE  RETURN."—  Released  March  9th.     Drama.     Length, 

1  045  feet 

'  A  drama  with  a  strong  story  of  life  in  the  West.  The  heroine, 
Betty  Blair,  lives  on  a  ranch,  and  one  day  is  insulted  by  a 
gambler  and  ne'er-do-well,  Joe  Keen.  He  tries  to  kiss .her  but 
she,  snatching  at  his  gun,  fires.  Horrified  at  what  she  has  done, 
she  fetches  her  brother,  and  between  them  they  hide  the  body. 
Later,  when  on  a  visit  to  a  school  friend,  she  meets  and  falls  in 
love  with  Frank  Stirling,  the  brother  of  the  man  she  believes  she 
has  killed.  Discovering  the  relationship  she  declares  she  cannot 
marry  Frank  ;  but  the  brother  turns  up  at  the  moment  that  Frank 
is  pleading  with  her  to  marry  him,  and  everything  ends  happily. 
An  excellent  story,  full  of  homely  touches  and  a  strong  love 
interest,  and  intensely  dramatic  in  parts. 


PATHE    FRERES, 

3t-3,  Charing  Cross  Rd.,  W.C. 


"THE  CONQUEST  OF  THE  POLE."— Released 
March  20th.     Length,  2.078  feet. 

One  of  the  most  grotesque  and  highly  humorous  films 
Mr.  Geo.  Melies  has  thus  far  given  us — which  is  saying 


"THE    CONQUEST   OF   THE    POLE"    [Pathc 


March,  191 2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


17 


ESSANAY 


MISS    LEONORE    ULRICH. 


Woiopl«5 


1 


w 


MR.  GILBERT  MAXWELL  ANDERSON. 


MR.    FRANK    X.    BUSHMAN. 


MISS    VEDA    BERTRAM. 


.The   People's   Popular   Players. 

No.  2— MEMBERS   OF   THE    ESSANAY    (WESTERN)    STOCK   COMPANY. 


18 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


MEN     OF     THE     MOMENT 

IN   THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    WORLD. 

No.  II. — Mr.  H.  A.  Spoor,  of  the  Essanay  Company. 


In  the  following  inter  view  Mr.  Spoor  makes  clear  the  friendly  attitude  of  the  American  to  the  English  film 
manufacturer;  and  declares  that  not  only  has  Cinematography  a  big  future,  but  that  there  cannot  be  any  question  as  to 
its  permanency. 


m 

mm 


AM  quite  sure  you  will  find  among  the  representa- 
tives of  the  American  film  companies  in  London 
a  very  kindly  feeling  towards  the  English  film, 
and  the  English  film  manufacturer." 

A  remark  eminently  typical  of  the  speaker,  for 
there  is  no  more  genial  man  in  the  film  business 
than  Mr.  H.  A.  Spoor,  of  the  Essanay  Company.  His  offices  in 
Wardour-street  are  the  recognised  resort  of  all  in  search  cf 
friendly  guidance,  or  the  help  of  a  friend  when  in  difficulty. 
Before  you  have  been  talking  to  him  many  minutes  you  recog- 
nise that  this  tall,  quiet,  self-contained  man  from  "  the  other 
side "  has  all  the  intricate  details  of  the  film  industry  at  his 
finger  tips.  He  explains  in  his  own  way  how  this  knowledge 
has  come  to  him. 

"George  K." 

"  You  see,  ever  since  my  brother  George  K.  started  in  the 
picture  business,  away  back  in  1896,  I  have  been  keenly  in- 
terested in  all  his  operations,  and  although  in  his  early  days  I 
was  busy  in  the  theatrical  world,  I  always  enjoyed  his  full 
confidence,  and  therefore  had  special  opportunities  of  picking 
up  a  lot  about  the  business." 

Apropos  of  which  I  learned  that  Mr.  H.  A.  Spoor  started  his 
career  with  Mr.  A.  M.  Palmer — one  of  the  best-known  theatrical 
managers  of  the  old  school  in  America — at  the  Great  Northern 
Theatre,  Chicago.  He  was  engaged  on  the  business  end  of  the 
enterprise,  and  during  his  two  years'  engagement  learned  a  lot 
from  this  old-time  showman.  Then  he  went  over  to  Messrs.  Lift 
and  Dingwall  at  the  McVickers  Theatre — generally  known  as  the 
Drury  Lane  of  America,  and  the  oldest  playhouse,  by  the  way, 
still  standing  in  that  country — and  remained  with  them  for 
fourteen  years.  During  all  this  time  Mr.  Spoor  was  gradually 
acquiring  a  knowledge  of  the  picture  business  which  in  after 
years  was  to  prove  invaluable  to  him. 

His  brother,  Mr.  G.  K.  Spoor,  first  began  manufacturing  films 
in  1896,  and  he  was  one  of  the  first  exhibitors  and  hirers  in 
America.  One  of  his  earliest  successes  was  a  film  showing  the 
first  inauguration  of  President  McKinley.  He  and  Edison 
were  the  only  two  who  accomplished  this  in  America.  Lumiere, 
the  famous  French  scientist,  whose  name  will  always  be  asso- 
ciated with  the  science  of  cinematography  as  one  of  its  earliest 
pioneers,  went  over  to  take  this  picture,  but  was  unable  to  get 
a  location,  and  Mr.  Spoor  allowed  him  to  share  his  stand. 

Foundation   of   the   Essanay   Company. 

Before  he  started  the  Essanay  Company  Mr.  Spoor's  brother 
was  one  of  America's  largest  exhibitors, "and  also  did  a  big 
theatrical  business,  running  his  own  touring  companies,  and 
owning  a  number  of  country  opera  houses.  Once  he  realised  *he 
future  of  the  picture  film  he  threw  all  this  to  the  winds,  and 
went  in  wholeheartedly  for  the  newer  form  of  entertainment. 
W  iseacres  shook  their  heads,  but  George  K.  knew  what  he  was 
about,  and  soon  the  Essanay  Company  became  a  power.  This 
was  Mr.  H.  A.  Spoor's  opportunity.  For  a  long  time  he  had 
been  seriously  thinking  of  following  in  his  brother's  footsteps, 
and  once  his  mind  was  made  up,  "  I  came  right  here  and 
started,"  he  said,  with  a  merry  laugh. 

And  right  here  he  is  to-day.  He  started  business  in  July, 
1909,  representing  the  Essanay  Company  in  England,  and  he 
owns  that  he  has  no  cause  to  complain  of  the  amount  of  support 
he  receives  from  the  English  exhibitor,  though  he  had  to  put 
up  a  pretty  stiff  fight  when  he  first  commenced,  and  it  was  six 


months  before  he  was  round  the  corner.  "  But  I  had  the  goods 
which  appealed,  and,  naturally,  I  was  bound  to  make  a  success 
in  the  end." 

Expensive  Stock  Compan'es. 

"  A  big  stock  company?  Well,  I  guess  we  have.  The  Essanay 
Company  is  indisputably  the  originator  of  the  popular  cowboy 
films,  and  we  have  38  permanent  people  in  our  western  stock 
company  alone.  They  travel  1.2,000  miles  a  year  by  rail 
in  Western  America,  following  the  seasons,  and  carry  four  40  ft. 
freight  cars,  a  60  ft.  sub-studio  car  (where  all  the  negatives  are 
developed),  and  ail  the  necessary  horses.  Yes,  these  films  cost 
a  deal  of  money.  Figure  it  out  for  yourself.  In  Chicago  we 
have  four  producers,  and  our  company  numbers  between  35'  and 
40  permanent  people,  Mr.  Gilbert  Maxwell  Anderson— who 
has  been  spoken  of  as  the  Bret  Harte  of  America— is  our  prin- 
cipal producer,  and  everyone  who  goes  into  a  picture  theatre 
recognises  him  as  soon  .as  he  appears  on  the  screen.  He  is  a 
junior  partner  with  my  brother  in  the  American  business." 

English  and  American  Methods. 

"  The  difference  between  the  English  and  American  methods  of 
handling  films?  Weil,  the  difference  is  pretty  big.  You  see, 
they  have  a  universal  release  date  throughout  the  United  States 
and  Canada,  owing  to  the  size  of  the  territory.  It  is  impossible 
under  these  conditions  to  sell  films  by  sample,  consequently  they 
are  practically  sold  on  standing  orders  over  there.  This  is  one 
of  the  reasons  why  the  American  manufacturer  aims  to  keep  -ip 
his  standard  of  product.  The  English  exhibitor  is  in  a  much 
better  position  to  get  good  programmes  on  account  of  the  open 
market  and  freedom  of  choice.  London  is  undoubtedly  the 
largest  film  market  in  the  world.  More  film  is  offered  here 
weekly  than  in  any  other  centre,  therefore,  the  showman  ought 
to  be  able  to  secure  a  programme  that  will  ensure  the  success 
of  his  business." 

Concerning  Artists— A   Comparison. 

"  Good  films  mean  good  artists.  True!  We  recruit  our  phoM- 
play  artists  from  the  theatrical  profession,  and  carefully  train 
them,  with  the  result  that  is  evidenced  in  the  quality  of  Essanav 
productions.  Where  can  you  find  better  talent  than  on  the  London 
stage  to-day?  You  have  the  best— undoubtedly  the  best  in  the 
world— and  plenty  of  it,  and  that  being  so,  English  films  should 
at  least  be  equal  to  the  best.  The  talent  lies  right  at  your  door. 
It  is  only  a  question  of  employing  it,  and  getting  the  artist  to 
appreciate  the  value  of  facial  expression  and  gesture.  In  my 
opinion,  the  English  film  is  making  splendid  advances,  and  I  say 
this  despite  statements  to  the  contrary.  The  Englishman  is  his 
own  greatest  slanderer.  He  slanders  himself  more  than  anvone 
slanders  him — you  understand  my  meaning?" 

An   Assured   Future. 

"The  future?  I  think  the  cinematograph  industry  has  an 
immense  future  before  it,  and  many  important  developments 
will  come  in  course  of  time.  It  is  even  now  in  a  state  of  evolu- 
tion. The  busine'swill  change, 
of  course,  but  as  to  its  per- 
manency, I  do  not  think  there 
is  any  question  at  all.  What 
say  ycu  ?  " 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


19 


OUR     PORTRAIT     GALLERY. 


fttt 


"  ESSANAY." 


'■ 


20 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   191 2. 


CHRISTOPHER  ! 


INTERESTING     DETAILS     OF     THE     SELIG     COMPANY'S     GREAT 

HISTORICAL     FILM, 

AND     A     CHAT    WITH     MIL     MONTAGU. 


^HOSE  of  us  who  have  seen  the  Selig  Polyscope  Com- 


pany's film,    "  Christopher    Columbus,"  must  neecu 
A  be  acutely  interested  in  the  production.     When  we 

™™H"I  see  upon  the  screen  the  statement  that  "  the  ships 
■Scfffe>»l  used  are  genuine  reproductions  of  the  caravels  of 
■«■■»»  Columbus  sent  by  the  Spanish  Government  to  the 
Columbian  Exhibition,"  it  is  obvious  that  a  big  story  is  in- 
volved. Fired  with  enthusiasm,  therefore,  I  hurried  off  to  inter- 
view Mr.  E.  H.  Montagu,  the  representative  of  the  Sel  g  Com- 
pany   for    all  the  world  outside  of  North  America. 

How  the   Film  was  Made. 

I  found  Mr.   Montagu  in  his  office,  wearing  a  big  cigar   and 
no   coat    (this   is   his   invariable  habit — he  says  that    it  enable:* 
Him    to    think    quicker),    and    in    a 
subdued  voice  I  asked  him  how  on 
earth  the  Selig  Company  had  man- 
aged to  produce  such  a  film. 

"Well,"  said  he,  "it  was  not  all 
done  in  five  minutes.  It  took  us 
some  three  years  to  get  it  in  going 
•order.  First  we  had  to  find  out  all 
about  Columbus  and  his  personal 
habits  ;  then  we  had  to  fit  it  into 
the  period  that  he  lived  in.  To  do 
this  we  retained  the  services  of 
antiquaries  and  research  artis;.=  , 
and  put  Mr.  C.  E.  Nixon,  a  well- 
known  author,  in  charge  of  thi- 
literary  end,  with  instructions  to 
control  our  research  staff  and  write 
the  scenario.  Then  we  dug  the 
Spanish  caravels  out  of  the  mud  of 
Jackson's  Park,  gave  a  ,£20,000 
bond  as  guarantee  that  we  would 
not  dent  or  sink  them,  repaired, 
caulked,  outfitted  them,  and  set 
crews  aboard,  and  soon  they  were 
manoeuvring  under  their  own  sail 
in  the  waters  of  Lake  Michigan.'" 

Here  I  put  in  a  mild  "Tinman 
interest"  inquiry,  "Are  all  the 
Selig  Stock  Company  good 
sailors?  " 

Mr.  Montagu  looked  injured,  rind 
remarked  that  "  The  Selig  Stock 
Company  can  do  anything  and  go 
anywhere.  Wrhy,  many  of  our 
leading  artistes  are  drawing  salaries 
of  over  £80  a  week,  and  we  keep 
a  number  of  producers  with  salaries 
from  £1,500  a  year.  Of  course, 
they  are  good  sailors  ! 

"  Well,  we  obtained  the  support  of 
the  Knights  of   Columbus,   the  great  American   org:    1      ili    n— a 
friendly   society,    as    you   would   call   it    over   heri — and    under 
their  auspices  we  produced  the  film  last  year." 

The  Film  Cost  £6.000. 

"It  must  have  cost  something  to  run  all  the  rehear; ah;  and 
risk  bad  weather?"  I  remarked. 

"  The  estimated  cost  of  that  film  was  £6,000,"  replied.  Mr. 
Montagu,  "and  it  cost  every  penny  of  it.  We  took  plenty 
of  time  to  get  things  right.  On  one  occasion  the  '  Sana  Maria  ' 
went  aground  on  a  sandbank  in  the  harbour,  and  had  to  be 
pulled  off  by  a  tug.  The  tug  captain,  when  he  got  alongside  the 
caravel,  said  he  never  heard  actors  curse  so  like  real  sailors 
before!  Yes,  there  was  lots  of  fun  in  the  production.  When 
Columbus    landed,    and    'discovered    America'    on     the    beach 


between  Hammond  and  Carey,  a  local  mob  of  hoboes,  who  had 
Lien  camping  along  the  shore,  were  struck  dumb  with  terror. 
When  Columbus  landed,  and  waved  his  sword,  that  finished 
it.  The  hoboes  turned  tail  'and  hiked  for  Chicago,  claiming 
that  they  had  seen  the  flying  Dutchman." 

The  Pope  to  see  it. 

"  What  was  the  opinion  of  the  people  in  the  States  with  regard 
to   the  film?"    I  asked. 

'•They  went  wild  over  it,"  said  Mr.  Montagu,  "and  Seligs 
have  been  publicly  thanked  for  their  staging  of  the  production 
by  the  highest  authorities.  We  gave  a  special  performance  of 
the  film  before  Cardinal  Gibbons,  of  Baltimore,  and  we  have 
jast  received  a  command  from  his  Holiness  the  Pope  to  arrange 
for  a  command  performance  of  the 
"  Christopher  Columbus '  film  at 
the  Vatican,  and  we  expect  to  have 
similar  requests  from  many  of  the 
crowned  heads  of  Europe." 

Mr.  Montagu,  who  was  originally 
intended  for  the  English  Bar,  left 
London,  and  remained  several 
years  in  the  States.  He  was  one 
of  the  first  business  men  to  enter 
the  cinematograph  industry,  and  he 
still  claims  that  the  industry  has 
not  yet  cut  all  its  milk  teeth.  In 
film  consumption  England  leads  the 
world,  and  our  colonies  are  rapidly 
following  the  lead  of  the  Mother 
Country.  Mr.  Montagu  is  distinctly 
impressed  by  the  future  of  the  big 
historical  and  educational  film,  and 
it  is  certain  that  his  firm,  Messrs. 
Selig,  have  placed  upon  the  market 
one  of  the  most  important  films  in 
this  respect  in  the  history  of  the 
cinematograph   industry. 


MR.     E.     H.      MONTAGU. 


CHRISTOPHER      COLUMBUS. 

An  Appreciation. 

A  representative  of  The  Cinema. 
who  attended  a  special  demonstra- 
tion of  the  "  Christopher  Colum- 
bus "  film  at  the  office  of  the  New 
Century  Film  Service,  Limited, 
writes  as  follows: — A  big  film  is 
always  of  more  than  general  in- 
terest, and  a  big  historical  film 
strikes    a    stronger    note   of    appeal 

sensational. 

Company's  film,  "  Christopher 
New    Centurv   Film    Service,    Ltd. 


than  a  mere  story,  however 

The  Selig  Polyscope 
( 'clumbus,"  for  whirh  the 
have  secured  the  exclusive  right  for  Great  Britain,  is  not  only 
a- masterpiece  of -production  from  the  dramatic  standpoint,  but 
it  strikes  an  entirely  new  note  in  the  history  of  cinematography. 

A  Man  cf  Renown. 

•  Take  Christopher  Columbus  the  navigator.  He  belongs  not 
merely  to  the  country  of  his  birth,  but  to  the  world  at  large. 
Wherever  a  civilised  tongue  is  spoken  the  name  of  Christopher 
Columbus  is  known  and  revered  as  one  of  the  world's  greate-t 
discoverers  and  navigators.  In  the  continent  he  discovered, 
now  a  group  of  young  nations,  his  name  lives  everywhere,  not 
as  a    mere   historical  fact,   a    dusty,   personality    of   the  history 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


21 


A   GREAT   HISTORICAL    FILM,    AND    AN    APPRECIATION. 


books,  but  as  a  glorious  benefactor  of  humanity.  Great  public 
squares  and  cafes  bear  his  name  ;  no  city  of  importance  in  Latin 
America  but  has  a  statue  to  him  erected  in  some  prominent 
place,  and  scattered  throughout  the  length  and  breadth  of  the 
land,  big  ranches  and  wayside  hostels  all  bear  the  name, 
'•  Christobal  Colon,"  that  has  gained  honour  and  the  admira- 
tion of  men  through  four  hundred  years. 

A  Great  Story  of    Human  Endeavour. 

English  people  learn  of  Christopher  Columbus  and  his  dis- 
covery of  America  just  as  do  the  thousands  of  other  people  of 
other  nationalities,  and  it  is  to  them  that  this  film  carries  its 
message  of  faith  and  heroism,  of  human  endeavour  and 
human  villainy.  We  see  Columbus  amidst  the  everyday 
surroundings  of  mediaeval  Spain  at  a  period  when  religious 
enthusiasm  was  at  its  highest,  and  Christianity  the  motive 
power  of  the  civilised  world.  In  those  days  faith  and 
religion  entered  deeply  into  the  everyday  life  of  the 
people,  and,  drawing  support  from  it,  men  dared  great 
enterprises.  Columbus  interests  Queen  Isabella's  confessor  in 
his  plan,  and,  through  him,  gains  the  Queen's  ear.  His  first 
interview  with  her  is  inter- 
rupted by  the  news  of  the 
overthrow  of  the  Moors  at 
Granada,  a  victory  for  the 
light  of  Christianity  against 
the  cruel  Moslem. 

This  very  victor)'  becomes 
an  omen  of  good  fortune, 
and,  secure  in  his  faith,  and 
secure  in  his  belief,  Colum- 
bus communicates  his 
enthusiasm  to  the  Queen, 
whom  we  see  prepared  to 
pawn  her  jewels  to  outfit 
the  adventure.  The  film 
shows  us  the  Court,  itself  a 
pageant,  with  heralds  bear- 
ing the  proud  quarterings  of 
Aragon  and  Castile,  and 
nobles  grouped  around  the 
.  dais  of  their  Queen,  while 
on  a  table  lie  her  jewels, 
o'er  which  the  sombre 
Hebrews  appraise  and  gloat. 
Fernandez,  the  Physician  of 
the  Court  of  Spain,  himself 
one  of  the  wise  men  of  Sala- 
manca, the  oldest  seat  of 
learning  in  Old  Spain,  one 
of  the  men  who  had  been 
appointed  to  inquire  into 
Columbus'  sanity,  to  prove 
his     faith     and  '  spare     his   Queen,  finances  the  expedition. 

The  Great  Adventure. 

In  a  garden  beyond  the  Palace  walls  the  Royal  Pavilion  is 
erected,  and  there  Columbus  receives  the  sword  that  signifies 
his  commission  as  Admiral  of  Spain,  and,  at  , the  same  time, 
receives  a  benison  from  the  Archbishop,  who,  attired  in  cope 
and  mitre,  and  attended  by  the  dignitaries  of  the 
Church,  invokes  the  blessing  of  Heaven  upon  the  great  adven- 
ture. Thus,  like  one  of  Arthur's  knights,  Columbus  sets  out 
upon  his  quest,  having  received  the  blessing  of  the  Church  and 
the  goodwill  of  his  Queen. 

Columbus  reviews  his  little  fleet,  the  three  ships  of  Palos, 
the  "  Santa  Maria,"  the  "  Pinta,"  and  the  "  Nina,"  and  hoists 
his  admiral's  pennant  aboard  the  "  Santa  Maria,"  his  flagship. 

We  see  the  actual  ships  manned  by  the  motley  crew  of  sea- 
faring men,  soldiers,  and  adventurers.  Little  boats  they  are, 
compared  with  our  modern  notions,  yet  in  such  boats  as  these 
mariners  sailed  from  Cadiz  and  Trocadero  to  far-off  lands,  and 
from  our  own  port  of  Bristol,  Sebastian  Cabot  put  forth  upon 
his  voyages  of  discovery. 

Mutiny  at  Sea. 

Ere  long  the  crews  of  the  little  ships,  cramped,  and  rendered 


THE    MUTINY    AT    SEA. 


sullen  by  long  idleness,  despairing  of  reaching  land  across  the 
endless  Western  Ocean,  mutiny,  and  demand  that  the  Admiral 
should  put  back  to  Spain.  The  news  reaches  him  where  he 
sits  at  work  o'er  his  charts,  and  surrounded  by  the  rough  instru- 
ments of  navigation,  attended  only  by  his  confessor.  Bis  cap- 
tains would  beat  back  the  mutineers  by  force  of  arms,  but 
Columbus  dominates  the  scene.  His  iron  strength  of  will  and 
fixed  faith  in  his  mission  cow  the  men,  and  they  disperse 
without  recourse  to  violent  measures. 

His  words  on  that  occasion  show  his  indomitable  faith  :  "  We 
have  set  sail  for  the  Indies  across  the  Western  Seas,  and,  with 
God's  help  and  blessing,  to  the  West  Indies  we  are  going.  Look 
you  to  it  that  we  have  no  more  of  this,  for,  grumbling  or  no 
grumbling,  we  are  going  to  find  the  land  we  came  so  far  to 
seek." 

At  dawn,  on  October  12,  Columbus  summons  his  officers  to  the 
quarter-deck,  and  tells  them  that  he  has  seen  lights  during  the 
night,  far  out  to  the  westward.  There  is  general  joy  at  the  news, 
and,  sailorlike,  the  crews  are  again  happy,  and  all  murmurings 
of  discontent  disappear.     The  fleet  is  headed,  westward,  and  as 

the  evolution  is  performed 
a  land  bird  perches  on  the 
rigging.  This  sign  of  land 
being  near  is  regarded  as  in- 
fallible, and  when  the  look- 
out spies  a  bush  covered 
with  berries  floating  near 
the  ship  it  is  recovered 
amidst  scenes  of  wildest 
acclamation,  and  carried  to 
the  Admiral. 

The  New-Found  Land. 

At  last  land  is  made,  and 
the  ships  cast  .  anchor, 
while  the.         wondering 

savages  come  down  to  wel- 
come   the    strangers    on   the 
beach.    Columbus,  attended 
by     his      ships'      company, 
takes  possession  of  the  new- 
found land  in  the  name  of 
Ferdinand       and       Isabella 
and  for  the  Christian  faith. 
The    natives   crowd    round, 
and  Pinzon,   fearing  attack, 
draws  his  sword   to  defend 
himself.         Columbus    bids 
him  sheathe  it,  saying,  "  We 
come   with    the    Cross,    not 
the'     Sword."        He      soon 
/        negotiates  a  treaty  with  the 
natives,    and  persuades   several  of  each   sex  to  accompany   him 
to    Spain.        Laden    with   strange    objects,    fruit,    and    animals, 
Columbus  sets  sail   for  home. 

We  see  the  triumph  of  the  returned  Admiral  at  Barcelona, 
where  he  is  received  by  the  King  and  Queen  at  Court,  and 
enters,  amidst  a  scene  of  enthusiasm  at  the  head  of  his  proces- 
sion, accompanied  by  natives  bearing  the  strange_  birds  and 
animals  of  the  new  world.  Columbus  kneels  to  his  King,  but  the 
Queen  bids  him  rise  a  knight  of  Spain,  in  token  of  her  gratitude. 

A  Sermon  in  Pictures. 

The  story  of  Columbus  is  in  itself  a  sermon  in  pictures.  The 
man's  iron  will  and  steadfast  faith,  his  kindness  and  mercy, 
and  all  the  qualities  of  high  chivalry  stand  forth  in  their  setting 
of  old-world  scenes  like  some  rare  jewel.  From  obscurity  to 
splendour — (then  the  undeserved  fall — again  into  dishonoured 
obscurity,  portray  an  epic  in  human  life. 

No  minister,  whatever  his  denomination  or  creed,  should 
miss  seeing  this  film,  which  cannot  but  stir  vivid  emotions  in 
any  breast.  There  is  material  here  for  an  appeal  to  all  the 
Christian  virtues,  and  put  up  in  better  form  than  the  most 
stirring  words.  In  pictures  with  strong  dramatic  influence,  and 
gesture  that  carries  the  emotions  with  it,  we  have  not  only  the 
story  of  the  great  discoverer,  but  a  vivid  picture  of  faith  and 
endeavour  in  a  cause. — H.  P. 


2? 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


Will  it  Last? — You  Can    See  for  Yourself — The  Need  for 
Care — Why  the  Inexperienced  get  into  Difficulties. 

ILL  it  last?  Has  it  come  to  stay,  or  will  it 
be  the  same  as  the  skating-rinks  ?  These 
and  similar  kinds  of  remarks  are  constantly 
being-  dinned  into  my  ears,  and  I  am 
really  getting-  tired  of  giving  various  ques- 
tioners my  well-worn  replies,  although  I  really  believe 
they  all  the  time  know  just  as  well  as  I  do  that  the  busi- 
ness is  even  yet  only  in  its  infancy.  They  are,  how- 
ever, thinking  of  investing  their  money  in  the  business, 
and  so  they  say  thev  desire  to  hear  from  "  one  who 
knows  "  his  very  latest  opinion. 

Surely  it  is  apparent  to  everyone  that  properties 
already  built  are  being  every  day  turned  into  theatres. 
Nearly  every  other  site  one  sees  advertised  now  is 
described  in  the  time-honoured  phrase,  "particularly 
suitable  for  a  cinematograph  theatre,"  and  500  to  600 
would-be  proprietors — and  more  clamouring  by  every 
post — are  waiting  for  suitable  properties.  They  all 
know  and  can  see  for  themselves.  The  business  :n 
England  has  mow  been  forging  ahead  for  nearly  four 
years.  It  has  been  doing  the  same  in  the  States  for 
over  ten  years. 

Were  the  skating-rinks  ever  in  this  position?  I  think 
not.  WJiy,  in  the  cinematograph  business  I  find  the 
major  portion  of  those  waking  to  come  in,  and  those 
in-the-business-and-asking-for-more,  are  some  of  the 
shrewdest  and  keenest  men  in  the  country.  They  know 
a  good  thing,  and  intend  being  in  it  when  there  is  an 
opportunity,  and  I  don't  blame  them,  nor  will  anyone 
else.     Mav  thev  all  succeed. 


But  care  must  be  taken,  however,  by  beginners. 
For  instance,  I  have  particulars  of  a  freehold  site  be- 
fore me  that  is  going  to  be  put  up  by  auction  at  the 
Mart  by  a  well-known  firm  of  auctioneers,  who  know 
their  business.  But  they  describe  a  site  of  32  ft. 
frontage  and  a  depth  of  40  ft.  as  "  suitable  for  the 
erection  of  a  popular  picture  palace." 

Now,  this  site  is  in  a  very  populous  main  street,  and 
the  reserve  may  be  something  like  ^8, coo.  If  one 
could  get  a  site  50  ft.  by  140  ft.,  and  could  seat 
1,000,  the  position  is  right.  But  what  is  the  use  of 
building  a  theatre  on  a  site  32  ft.  by  40  ft.,  and 
having  to  buy  an  expensive  freehold  in  addition — cost 
of  freehold,  say,  p^S.  000 ;  cost  of  building,  seating  aid 
equipment,  say,  ^5,000 — and  then  only  be  able  to  seat 
about  200?  An  outlay  of  ^13,000  to  seat  200.  No 
wonder  the  inexperienced  have  sometimes  got  into 
difficulties, 


Various  theatres  have  changed  hands  during  the 
month.  Amongst  them  may  be  mentioned  the  National 
Hall  Hornsey,  and  the  Picture  Theatre,  Kingston-on- 
Thames.  There  are  plenty  of  good  ones  in  the 
market,  and  plenty  of  sites  in  some  of  the  best  un- 
exploited  positions.  They  are,  however,  being  very 
much  sought  after,  and  new  seekers  after  safe  and  re- 
munerative incomes  are  striving  their  utmost  to  secure 
the  remaining  positions. 

<*- 

In  this  month's  issue  of  The  Cinema  will  be  found 
some  of  the  best  in  the  market,  and  all  those  who  have 
theatres  and  sites  to  let  or  sell  will,  I  think,  find  it 
beneficial  to  make  use  of  these  columns,  because  it  is 
intended  that  this  magazine  shall  reach  all  who  are 
looking  for  cinema  properties  of  every  description.  It 
will  be  a  property  gazette  in  every  sense  of  the  word. 
Our  earnest  desire  will  be  to  create  a  valuable  medium 
for  the  quick  disposal  of  all  properties,  so  that  there 
.'■hall  not  be  any  "  hanging  fire  "  in  the  cinema  market. 

The  Trade  must  be  kept  up ;  the  business  must 
boom  ;  money  must  be  kept  flowing  into  the  business, 
both  from  the  investor  and  the  patron.  The  public 
must  see  that  for  every  cinema  property  that  comes 
into  the  market  there  are  at  least  twenty  buyers,  and 
that  it  is  an  absolute  proof  that  the  business  is  still 
young.  The  more  money  in  the  business,  the  better 
for  the  Trade  as  a  whole,  the  stronger  the  forces  to 
fight  our  battles,  and  the  greater  our  chances  of  success 
in  winning  them.  I  feel  sure  that  all  my  readers  who 
know  will  agree  that  this  is  their  opinion,  as  well  as 
that  of 


Praise  for  the  Pictures. 

At  the  Oldham  Licensing  Sessions  the  Chairman  said 
that  although  there  was  a  diminution  of  cases  of 
drunkenness  in  the  town,  still  there  was  room  for  much 
improvement. 

In  a  recent  communication  to  the  Clerk,  the  Chief 
Constable  spoke  of  the  improvement  as  being  partly 
due  to  "  the  wonderful  change  effected  in  the  customs 
of  habitues  of  public-houses,  due  in  the  main  to  the 
picture  shows  which  have  sprung  up  during  the  last 
two  years,  giving  as  they  do  two  or  three  performances 
per  dav,  the  admission  fee  being  such  as  to  enable 
persons  of  ordinary  means  to  do  the  whole  round  of  the 
shows. 

Bench  Pleased  with  Pictures. 

The  Chairman,  alluding  to  the  Chief  Constable's  re- 
ferences to  picture  shows,  emphasised  the  observations 
that  picture  shows  were  drawing  people  from  the 
public-houses.  It  was  evident  that  pictures  were  going 
to  be  a  permanent  form  of  entertainment  for  the 
people,  and  if  well  conducted  they  could  be  a  means  of 
rational  enjoyment,  and  also  an  instruction.  They 
v.  ere  pleased  to  notice  their  success. 


March,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


23 


HE  licensee  of  the  Coronation  Picture  Hall,  Annits- 
ford,  was  fined  £2  and  costs  for  overcrowding. 

Picture    palaces    are     sometimes     put     to     many 
strange  uses,   but  the  most  unusual   is  the  holding 
of   a   County  Court   upon   the  stage  of   a  cinemato- 
graph hall,  as  is  now  being  done  at  Frome.     The 
judge  literally  occupies  the  centre  of  the  stage. 

Mr.  J.  F.  Wood,  of  the  Birkenhead  Queen's  Hall,  was  fined 
^20  and  costs  for  failing  to  provide  a  sufficient  number  of 
attendants  to  supervise  the  children  in  the  gallery.  At  the 
same  Court  Mr.  Edwin  Haigh,  managing  director  of  the 
Birkenhead  Picturedrome,  was  fined  ^10  for  permitting  exits 
to  be  blocked  by  children.  Mr.  Haigh  regretted  the  occurrence, 
and  said  that  nothing  of  the  sort  should  occur  again. 

Mr.  Justice  Neville  granted  leave  to  withdraw  petition  with- 
out costs  to  the  Safety  Bioscope  Supplies  Co.,  Limited,  a  com- 
position having  been  paid  to  the  creditors.  The  petition  of 
the  Premier  Electric  Theatre  (Highbury),  Limited,  was  also 
withdrawn  by  leave,  without  costs. 

For  giving  a  cinematograph  entertainment  in  connection 
with  a  bazaar,  Alexander  Spence  Miller,  Grangemouth,  was 
fined  two  guineas  at  Falkirk  Sheriff  Court,  for  a  breach  of  the 
Cinematograph  Act. 


A  QUESTION  OF  COPYRIGHT. 

A  point  affecting  cinematograph  copyright  was  recently 
raised  in  the  Paris  Courts.  It  was  contended  by  the  publisher 
Calmann-Levy,  that  a  film  production  of  ''  The  Three 
Musketeers  ■'  and  other  Dumas  novels  was  an  infringement  of 
his  copyright  of  these  books.  As  it  happens,  Calmann-Levy 
has  only  the  book  rights,  the  dramatic  rights  having  been 
separately  disposed  of  by  Dumas'  heirs.  This  lost  him  the  case, 
as  the  Court  held  that  a  cinematograph  production  was  not  an 
"  edition  de  luxe,'-  as  contended,  but  a  stage  play.  A  book 
was  primarily  intended  for  private  consumption,  while  a  play 
was  enjoyed  in  the  company  of  other  people  ;  moreover,  there 
was  acting,  scenery,  and  make-up  in  a  film,  which  gave  it  the 
character  of  a  stage  play.  In  view  of  this  decision  the  heirs 
of  Alexandre  Dumas,  who  hold  the  theatrical  rights  of  his 
works,  will  receive  fees  from  the  firm  who  made  moving  pictures 
from  his  books. 


THE  RIGHT  TO  TAKE  SAMPLES. 

It  has  been  successfully  contended  that  police  officers  have 
no  right  to  take  samples  of  hired  films.  This  is  the  result  of  the 
decision  of  the  Aldershot  Bench,  where  Mr.  Jackson,  of  the 
Picturedrome,  Farnborough,  was  summoned  for  unlawfully 
hindering  and  obstructing  a  police  officer  in  the  discharge  of 
his  duty.  A  police  officer,  accompanied  by  an  officer  appointed 
under  the  Cinematograph  Act,  visited  the  defendant's  show  with 
a  view  to  taking  samples  of  the  films  to  see  whether  they  were 
inflammable  or  not.  The  defendant  refused  to  give  samples 
unless  he  were  paid  for  the  damage  done.  No  force  was  used. 
Later,  at  the  hearing  of  the  case  before  the  Bench,  the  defendant 
pleaded  that  he  was  merely  the  bailee  of  the  property,  and  as 
such,  responsible  for  any  damage  done  to  the  films  while  in  his 
possession,  and  was  within  his  rights  in  refusing  to  let  the 
officer  take  away  the  film.  Should  they,  however,  have  merely 
demanded  that  he  should  show  them  that  the  films  were  non- 
flam,  he  would  willingly  have  proved  it  to  them  there  and  then. 
The  Bench  decided  that  as  the  police  officers  were  not  obstructed 
in  their  entering  the  theatre,  the  case  would  have  to  be  dis- 
missed. 


JURY'S 


EXCLUSIVE 


PRODUCTIONS 


Doaaoaa 
RDEtfon 

BgpgOB 

ODODDoO 


Doaaoaa 


MESSRS.    JURY'S  HAVE  PLEASURE  IN  PRESENTING 

Madame  Sarah  Bernhardt    company1; 

in  "  The  Lady  of  the  Camellias," 

AND 

Madame    Rejane    and  full  company,  in 

"  Madame   Sans-Gene." 


(By  arrangement   with  Le  Film  a" Art  of  Paris.) 


ALL     PARTICULARS     MAY     BE     OBTAINED     OF 

Messrs.  JURY'S  IMPERIAL  PICTURES,  Limited, 

7a,  UPPER  ST.  MARTIN  S  LANE,  LONDON,  W.C 


Phone : 
3846,   CENTRAL. 


'Phone  : 
5015,    GERRARD. 


24  THE     CINEMA.  March,   1912. 


SELIG'S 


CHRISTOPHER 
COLUMBUS. 


March,  1912.  THE     CINEMA.  25 


For    particulars    as    to    the  < 

exclusive  rights  for  showing 
the  greatest  film  ever  pro- 
duced, and  also  of  the  widest 
and  most  comprehensive 
publicity  Campaign  ever 
organised  in  connection 
with  any  film,  write  to  the 

NEW  CENTURY 
FILM  SERVICE 

HD. 

2  &  4,  Quebec  St.,    48,  Rupert  St., 
LEEDS.  LONDON,  W. 

Agents    for    Northern    C  ounties  —  REED. 

BROWN    &    CO.,      148,    Westgate    Road, 

Newcastle-on  Tyne. 


26 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,  1912. 


MEMS. 


A  dividend  of  21,  per  cent,  per  annum  for  the  half-year 
ending  December  1  fast  has  been  declared  by  the  Harper  Elec- 
tric  Piano  (1910).   Co.,   Ltd. 

In  the  report  presented  at  the  third  annual  general  meeting 
of  the  Electric  Theatres  (1908),  Ltd..  the  directors  state  that 
the  profit  for  the  year,  including  ,£3,188  17s.  gd.  brought  for- 
ward from  last  account,  and  after  providing  management  ex- 
penses, directors'  fees,  debenture  interest,  law  costs,  and 
general  expenses,  amounts  to  .£11,977  14s-  !d-  Out  OI  trlis  sum 
the  directors  have  declared  an  interim  dividend  of  10  per  cent., 
paid  in  July,  191 1,  absorbing  £3,202  17s.  6d.,  leaving  a  bal- 
ance of  /.8,774  16s.  7d.  On  January  i  the  directors  declared 
and  paid  a  final  dividend  of  10  per  cent,  per  annum,  absorbing 
,£4,000,  leaving  a  balance  to  carry  forward  of  ,£4.774  16s-  7d- 

An  interim  dividend  at  the  rate  of  10  per  cent,  per  annum 
has  been  declared  by  the  Luton  Picturedrome,  Ltd. 

Penzance  Central  Hall  Co.,  Ltd.,  has  paid  a  dividend  ot  4s.  per 
share,  being  at  the  rate  of  20  p^r  cent,  per  annum. 

The  Aberdeen  Music  Hall  Co.,  Ltd.,  has  declared  a  dividend 
of  4  per  cent,  for  the  year.  One  of  the  speakers  at  the  annual 
meeting  said  he  thought  the  popularity  of  cinematograph 
theatres  was  not  likely  to  continue.  They  would  catch  the 
public  for  a  short  time  and  afterwards  pass  away.     Perhaps! 


NEW  COMPANIES. 


Les  Grottes  Casino  Syndicate,  No.  2,  Ltd. — Capital 
£1,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private  Company.  116-117,  Chancery- 
lane,   YV.C. 

Leamington  Electric  Theatre  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£1,000, 
in  £1  shares.  Private  Company.  St  Nicholas-chambers,  New- 
castle-on-Tyne 

Chorlton  Pavilion,  Ltd. — ,£2,500,  in  ,£i  shares.  Private 
Company.     9,   Queen-street  Oldham. 

Atlas  Picturedromk,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,000,  in  700  10  per 
cent,  preference  shares  of  £1  each,  and  6,000  ordinary  share:, 
of  is.  each.  Private  Company.  5,  Mellot-street,  Droylsden, 
Manchester. 

Dreadnought  Pictures,  Ltd. — Capital  £500,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  Company      3,   Mid-street.  Hathgate. 

Osborne  Pictures,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£5,000,  in  4,970  preference 
shares  of  £1  each,  and  600  deferred  shares  of  is.  each. 
Private  Company.     Clegg-street,   Oldham. 

Coronation  Electric  Theatre  (Manor  Park),  Ltd. — 
Capital  £3,500,  in  ,£1  shares.     73,  Romford-road,  Stratford,  E. 

Scottish  National  Electric  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital 
,£2,000,  in  £1  shares.     37,  York-place,  Edinburgh. 

Imperial  Hall  Company  (Felling),  Ltd. — Capital  ,£2,000, 
in  £1  shares.  Private  Company.  4,  Westmorland-road,  New- 
castle-on-Tyne. 

W.  A.  Barraud,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,000,  in  ,£1  shares.  Private 
Company.      1,   New    Inn-yard,   Great   Kastern-street,  E.G. 

Tranmere  Electric  Palace  and  Billiard  Hall  Co.,  Lid. 
— Capital  .£3.000,  in  £1  shares.     Private  Company. 

Electric  Gyroscope  Kinematograph  Camera  Co. — Capital 
£5,000,    in    £1     shares.       Kinematograph   and    appliance    manu- 


facturers,   iVx.      Private    Company.        Among     subscribers    are 
Messrs.    W.    F.  Jury   and  \V.    Firth. 

CiNEPHOTOS,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£500,  in  ,£1  shares.  To  acquire 
an  invention  relating  to  kinematography  from  H.  Roberts,  of 
Cxbridge-road.  Registered  office,  150,  Uxbridge-road,  Shep- 
herd's   Push,    W. 

Incorporated  Association  of  Film  Renters. — This  body 
has  recently  registered  with  200  members,  each  liable  for  £1 
in  the  event  of  a  winding-up.  The  objects  of  the  association 
are  to  protect  the  interests  of  all  manufacturers,  distributors, 
and  renters  of  cinematograph  films.  Members  of  the  council, 
Messrs.  S.  H.  Carter,  J.  W.  Smith,  J.  Lambert,  J.  C.  Squier, 
J.  D.  Walker,  H.  D.  Wood,  A.  T.  Bennett  (secretary).  Offices, 
45,    Chandos-street,  Charing   Cross. 

Wray  Film  Agency,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£2,500,  in  ,£1  shares. 
Wholesale  and  retail  dealers  in  cinema  films,  machines,  &c. 
Private  Company. 

Brighton  Grand  Concert  Hall  and  Picture  Palace,  Ltd. 
— Capital  £20,000,  iu  ,£1  shares  (12,000  preference  and  8,000 
ordinary).      Picture  palace   proprietors.     Private  Company. 

T.    W.    Cinemat.    Theatre,    Ltd. — Capital    ,£1,000,    in     £1 

shares.      Cinema  theatre  proprietors.     Private  Company. 

Princes  Hall  Cinema  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £4,000,  in  £1 
shares.  Cinema  theatre  proprietors.  Princes  Hall,  Stoke-on- 
Trent. 

Bodmin  Picture  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£1,000,  in  £1 
shares.     Private    Company. 

Kingston  Varieties  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  .£5,000,  in  £1 
shares  (500  deferred).  Private  Company.  8,  Trinity  House- 
lane,   Hull. 

M.  P.  Sales  Agency,  Ltd. — Capital  ^.15,000,  in  £1  shares 
(14,000  preference,  480  '"  A"  ordinary,  and  520  "B"  ordinary). 
Film  manufacturers.    Private  Company.   86,  Wardour-street,  W. 

Bedford  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  Company.     58  and  60,  High-street,  Bedford. 

Eagle  Pictirf.dromes,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  .£1  shares. 
To  erect  a  cinema  theatre. 

Tranmere  Electric  Palace  and  Billiard  Hall  Co.,  Ltd. 
— Capital  ,£3,000,  in  £1   shares.     Private  Company. 

Yenner's  Signs,  Ltd. — Capital  £11,000,  in  £1  shares. 

Electric  Playhouses  Syndicate,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£1,040,  in 
1,000  ordinary  shares  of  ,£1  and  800  deferred  at  is.  Private 
Company. 

SlTTINCir  CRNE        ELECTRIC        THEATRE        Co.,        LTD.— Capital 

^1,600,   in  £1   shares.     Private   Company. 

Electric  Pavilion  (Edgware-road),  Ltd. — Capital  £15,000, 
in  £1   shares.     Private  Company.     2,    Cockspur-street,   S.W. 

Screen,  Ltd. — Capital  £5,000,  in  £1  shares.  Carry  on  the 
Apollo  Theatre,  Merton.  Private  Company.  107,  109,  Merton- 
road,   Wimbledon. 

Hippodrome  (Falkirk),  Ltd. — Capital  £8,000,  in  5s.  shares. 
5,  Broad-street-place,  E.C. 

Obelisk  Picture  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  £1 
shares.      Private  Company.     Lewisham  Bridge,  S.E. 

Irish  Living  Picture  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  £i 
share.     Private  Company.     Shipquay-street,   Londonderry. 

Red  Diamond  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £200,  in 
£1  shares. 

Cleveland  and  District  Electric  Palaces,  Ltd.— Capital 
£1,000,  in  £1   shares.     Private  Company. 

Jury's  Kine  Supplies,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£5,000,  in  ,£1  shares. 
Private   Company. 

Educational  and  Industrial  Films,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£10,000, 
in  8,500  ordinary  shares  of  £1,  and  30,000  deferred  shares  of 
is.  17,  18,  and  19,  Great  Windmill-street,  Piccadilly-circus, 
W. 

Savoy  (Manchester)  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital 
£2,000,  in  .£1  shares.     Private  Company. 

Jacksdale  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in 
£10  shares. 

J.G.L.  Syndicate. — Capital  £5,000,  in  ,£1  shares.  Private 
Company.     99,   Shoieditch  High-street,  E. 

Picture  Palladiums,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£6,000,  in  ,£1  shares. 
34,    Creat    Tames-street,    Bedford-row,    W.C. 

Gai.way  Cinema,  Ltd. — Capital  ,£1,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private 
Company      51.    Graf  ton-street,   Dublin. 


March,   igi2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


27 


"The  Handbook  of  Kinematography."  By  Colin  X.  Bennett, 
F.C.S.     (Heron  and  Co.) 

This  handsome  volume,  which  runs  into  nearly  300  pages,  may 
justly  be  described  as  the  standard  work  on  cinematography — 
01  Cinematography,  as  its  compiler  prefers  to  call  it.  Produced 
under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Colin  N.  Bennett,  F.C.S.,  who  has 
the  advantage  of  a  most  competent  list  of  contributors,  each  an 
expert  in  his  own  department,  the  pages  of  this  book  are  replete 
with  the  most  valuable  information  on  subjects  of  everyday 
requirement. 

Mr.  Bennett  himself  is  an  expert  in  photography  and  cine- 
matography, and  his  wide  knowledge  of  the  subject  is  every- 
where apparent  in  these  pages.  In  his  interesting  historical 
preface  he  traces  the  cinematograph  in  its  original  form  back  to 
the  year  65  B.C.  (  !)  when  Lucretius  made  certain  pertinent  re- 
marks on  the  persistence  of  vision — the  rock  upon  which  the 
whole  theory  of  motion  photography  is  built — in  his  work,  "  De 
Rerum  Xatura."  He  refers  to  Ptolemy's  books  on  optics,  and 
then  jumps  forward  nearly  eighteen  hundred  years  to  1825,  when 
the  thaumatrope  was  invented.  From  this  he  proceeds  to  discuss 
in  turn  the  phenakistoscope,  the  zoetrope,  and  the  choreuto- 
scope,  and  eventually  conies  down  to  the  cinematograph  as  we 
know  it  to-day. 

A  handbook  in  every  sense  of  the  word,  this  volume  contains 
the  digested  experience  of  experts  on  every  available  subject  of 
use  to  the  follower  of  this  new  art.  Every  detail  in  the  taking 
and  making  of  pictures  is  carefully  and  clearly  explained,  and 
some  of  the  later  chapters  of  the  book  on  playing  to  pictures,  the 
making  of  slides,  hints  for  the  operator,  and  a  very  clear  ex- 
position of  the  law  in  relation  to  the  cinematograph,  make  it  an 
invaluable  work  of  reference  to  everyone  engaged  in  the 
industrv. 


"  Picture  Plays  and  How  to  Write  Them.''  Edited  by  E.  J. 
Muddle. 
For  those  who  aim  at  writing  the  scenarios  for  picture  plavs 
this  little  book  should  prove  a  veritable  vade  mecum.  Mr. 
Muddle,  with  the  assistance  of  Messrs.  J.  Laurence  Pritchard, 
B.A.,  James  W.  Barber,  A.M.I.E.E.,  and  J.  Black  Matheson, 
has  very  thoroughly  covered  the  ground,  and  the  man  who  can- 
not write  a  saleable  picture  play-plot  after  mastering  the  in- 
formation contained  in  this  useful  publication  should  direct  his 
energies  elsewhere. 


"The   Practical    Electrician's   Pocket-Book  and  Diary  for 
1912."     (S.  Rentell  and  Co.,  Ltd.     is.) 
This   well-known    electrician's    publication    has    now    reached 
its    fifteenth    annual    edition,    and    now    includes    a    section    of 


0 


U 


Bocks  that  are    Worth    Bu ving — 

HANDBOOK    OF 
KINEMATOGRAPHY 

By  Colin   N,    Bennett,  F.C-S. 

A     complete    treatise     on    the     history,     theory    and 

practice    of    Motion     Kinematography.        310     pages. 

2co  Illustrations.     Pries  5s.     Postage  6d  extra. 

THE     MODERN 
BIOSCOPE  OPERATOR 

Proprietors     of      Picture      Theatses,     Managers    and 

Operators    will    alike    find    a    vast    amount   of    uselul 

information   in    this  book.       It    is    the    only    book    of 

its  kind  that  has  ever  been  published.      Price  33.  6d. 

Postage  3d.  extra. 

Write  for  Complete  Litt  0/  Cinematograph   Books. 

THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    PRESS, 

16,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  London,  W.C. 


0 


0 


THE  BOOK   TO   READ. 

Moving  Pictures 

HOW    THEY    ARE    MADE 
AND    WORKED. 

By   Frederick   A.   Talbot. 


The   Cinema,   says: 

"A  most  comprehensive  history  of  H12  moving  picture  from  its 
earliest  days.  .  .  .  Fascinating  reading  even  for  the  practical 
man,  and  the  various  mechanical  aspects  of  cinematography  are 
treated  so  clearly  that  tha  book  should  appeal  to  many  already 
engaged   in   the   business." 


Price  6s. 

W.  HEINEMANN,  Bedford  St.,  W.C. 


interest  to  the  cinematograph  operator,  contributed  by  the  well- 
known  authority,  Mr.  J.  W.  Barber,  A.M.-I.E.E.  This  section 
deals  briefly  with  the  optics  of  the  cinematograph  projector, 
and  the  setting  of  the  arc.  The  pocket-book  itself  contains  a 
mass  of  information,  rules,  and  statistics  relating  to  every  pos- 
sible factor  of  electricity  in  modern  life,  from  the  power  station 
to  the  electric  flat-iron,  while  a  very  considerable  section  is 
devoted  to  electrical  measuring  instruments,  and  contains  useful 
material  forms  at  the  end.  It  is  indispensable  to  the  modern 
working  electrician. 

"  Alternating  Currents  :  Their  Nature  and  Their  Uses."  By 
James  W.  Barber,  A.M.I.E.E.     (Ganes,  Ltd.    6d.) 

The  average  cinematograph  operator  does  not  pretend  to 
have  a  deep  and  exhaustive  knowledge  of  theoretical  electrical 
practice,  and  is,  in  the  majority  of  cases,  a  man  of  limited 
scientific  education.  Mr.  Barber  has  written  a  pamphlet  which 
explains  the  subject  of  alternating  currents  without  any  flights 
into  the  realm  of  highly  technical  terminology.  The  pitfalls  of 
the  comparison  of  electric  measurements  in  direct  current  and 
alternating  current  are  clearly  shown,  and  the  theory  of  phases 
is  illustrated  by  simple  diagrams. 

The  principle  of  the  transformer,  and  its  efficiency,  its 
economy,  and  its  wirings,  the  action  of  a  choking  coil,  and  the 
use  of  the  auto-transformer  in  lighting  circuits  are  all  explained 
in  simple  language  and  in  very  readable  form. 

"The  Bioscope  Electricians'  Handbook."  By  James  \Y, 
Barber,  A.M.I.E.E.  (Ganes,  Ltd.). 
This  little  book  comprises  what  might  be  called  the  cinemato- 
graph operators'  "  Molesworth."  Should  the  operator  have 
trouble  with  his  connections,  and  suspect  that,  while  fixing  his 
board,  he  has  mixed  up  his  leads,  he  has  only  to  turn  to  the 
beautifully  explicit  wiring  diagrams  in  Mr.  Barber's  book  in 
order  to  locate  his  fault.  The  little  dictionary  of  electrical  terms 
is  wonderfully  clearly  expressed,  and  any  operator  with  the 
slightest  knowledge  of  electricity,  and  the  assistance  of  this  little 
book,  should  be  able  to  cope  with  any  ordinary  trouble  that 
he  is  likely  to  encounter. 


28 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


YOU    SAVE     MONEY- 


ON     PICTURE    THEATRE     EQUIPMENT 

and    Reduction  in   Electricity  Accounts 

BY    CONSULTING 

Mr.  JAMES  W.  BARBER,  A.M.I.E.E., 

Independent  Consulting  Electrical  and  Cinematograph  Engineer 

(Author  of  "The  Bioscope  Electrician's  Handbook," 
"  Alternating  Currents,"  etc.,  etc.) 

Schemes  pre  ared  and  advice  given  on  all    Picture  Thea're  Fquipment. 
Inspections  and    Insurance  of  Electrical   Plant  against   Breakdown,  etc. 


106, 


Aiuiress-AROYLE     CHAMBERS, 
CHARING     CROSS     ROAD,     LONDON,     W.C. 


Every  operator  should  possess  a  copy  of  "  The  Bioscope  Elec- 
trician's Handbook." —"The  Operator's  Vade  Mecum"  (vide  Press), 
1  -  post  free  from  the  above.  Also  "Alternating  Currents — Their 
Nature  and  Their  Uses."  -A  Practical  Manual  for  the  Bioscope 
Operator.  6Jd.  post  free.  Tel.  12598  Central. 


FILMS  CLEANED  &  REPAIRED 

BY  CHEMICAL   PROCESS. 

3s.    per    1,000    feet    inclusive. 

We  are  Cleaning  for  the  Trade  all  over  the  World. 

ALL    DONE  BY   HAND.         NO  MACHINERY  USED. 
PARTS  OF  PROJECTORS  SUPPLIED. 

And  Repairs  of  Every  Description  promptly  done  by  Experienced  Workmen. 


TRY    OUR    NEW    EXPRESS    SERVICE. 

Films  sent  for  at  9  a.m.   returned  Cleaned 
and  Repaired  by  6  o'clock  in  the  Evening. 


F.  HATE,  6,  Ingestre  Place,  Golden  Square,  London,  W. 

Telephone  9768  Gerrard. 


The  "Allefex"  is  a  sound-effects  machine  for  accompanying 
moving  pictures.  More  than  30  different  effects,  which  can  all  be 
worked  by  one  man.  All  the  effects  of  land,  sea  and  sky, 
including  battles,  trains,  motor  cars,  horses,  lightning,  etc.,  etc. 
Call  and  hear  it,  or  write  for  illustrated  list. 


Andrews'  Film  Hire  Service  is  thoroughly  Up-to-date.  The  whole 
of  the  films  released  weekly  in  England  are  reviewed  by  our  own 
buyer  who  devotes  his  whole  time  to  the  work.  Programs  to 
suit  all  classes  of  Picture  Theatres  at  the  lowest  possible  prices. 
May  we  submit  particulars  and  specimen  programs? 


ANDREWS'  PICTURES,  L™. 


CINE   HOUSE,    GREEK    STREET, 
LONDON,    W. 


Periodical     Sales    by    Auction 

:   :  :      OF    :   :  : 

Theatres,  Halls,  €s  Sites, 


Reports  and  Valua- 
tions for  al!  purposes. 

Advisory     Reports 
given. 

Negotiations     Con- 
ducted for  Purchasers 


HELD  AT  THE  MART.  TOKENHOUSE  YARD,  E.C..  OR    IN    THE  PROVINCES 
v?     ^»     *       BY  ARRANGEMENT,    AT  LOW  INCLUSIVE  FEES.       *     *     * 


For  Terras   and    Part.cul 


iars   apply 


Messrs.     Harris     <S    Gillow, 

451a,    Oxford    Street,     London,    W. 


Cinematograph     ^> 
Property        Experts 


Reliable 
Resistances 


for  Cinematographs, 
Lamp  Dimming, 
Motor  Regulation. 


Get  our 
Quotation 
to  your 
Exact 
Require- 
ments. 


W.  MICKELWfilGHT  &  CO.,  Resistance  Specialists, 
Sicilian  House,  Southampton  Row,  W.C. 


TELEPHONE  9421    CITY. 


Telephone  No. 
9804  Gerrard. 


Telegraphic  Address  : 
"  Grampires,  London. 


LONDON  BIOSCOPE  SCHOOL 

9,    ST.    MARTIN'S    COURT, 
CHARING    CROSS   ROAD,  W.C. 


All  those  wanting  Experienced 
OPERATORS   &  ASSISTANTS 

apply  as  above. 


March,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


29 


^^^ 


LONDON  &*,  PROVINCIAL  THEATRES  fe  SITES 
TO  BE*  LET- OR.- SOLD. 


Applicants  requiring  further  particulars  and  orders  to  view  any  of  the  properties  mentioned  in  the  subjoined  list 
are  requested  to  q  lote  the  foli  3  number  attached,  and  be  precise  in  the  information  they  seek.  Applicants  not 
Ceding  their  requirements  in  this  list  are  inviied  to  forward  a  description  of  the  in\estment  they  are  seeking, 
and  particulars  of  anything  suitable  will  be  forwarded  from  time  to  time  without  charge  by  the  respective  agents. 


For  Scale  of  Charges  for  Advertisements 
under  this  heading,  apply  to  The  Manager, 
THE  CINEMA  NEWS  &  PROPERTY.GAZETTE, 
LTD.,    21,    NORTH    AUDLEY    STREET,    W. 


selection  of  properties  from  the  registers  of 

Messrs.   Harris   &   Gillow,   Cinematograph    Property   Experts 

451a,   Oxford   Street,    London,    W. 


LONDON    THEATRES. 


LONDON,  E.— Frontage  20  ft.,  depth  80  ft.  Hold  about  300.  Estab- 
lished Christmas,  1910.  A  going  concern  with  a  lease  of  10  years,  at  the 
low  inclusive  rent  of  .660  per  annum.     Price,  inclusive,  £425.     Fo.   518a 

LONDON,  S.W.— A  smart  little  Theatre  seating  about  300.  Price,  in- 
clusive  of  everything,  £600.     Fo.    751b 

LONDON,  N.— A  snug  little  Theatre,  built  about  a  year  ago  at  a  cost  of 
about  £3,500.  Lease  80  years.  Ground  Rent  £85  per  annum.  Hold  about 
650.     Price,    including    everything,   .£2,000,  £  1,000  of    which    can   remain. 

Fo.    684y 

LONDON  SUBURB,  N.W.— Public  Hall  built  about  4J  years  ago,  31  ft. 
6  in.  frontage,  110  ft.  deep,  holding  about  650.  Price,  freehold,  inclusive 
of  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  £3,400  (a  part  might  remain).  First  floor  let  off 
at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  653b 

LONDON,  S.E. — A  good  Theatre,  at  present  seating  about  360  and 
making  a  net  profit  of  about  £300  per  annum,  which  can  be  considerably 
increased.  Established  nearly  two  years.  Adjacent  land  has  been  acquired 
with  the  object  of  enlarging  the  Hall  to  seat  over  1,000.  Rent  ,6200  per 
annum,    premium  £500.     Fo.   664b 

LONDON,  S.E. — Cinema  Theatre,  seating  400.  Established  over  two 
years.  Books  are  kept  and  open  to  inspection.  Average  takings  £21  per 
week.     Rent    £150  per  annum.     Lease  five  years.     Price    .£350.     Well  fitted. 

Fo.  586y 

LONDON,  N. — Theatre  seating  450,  with  standing  room  for  200  in 
gallery.  Lease  80  years.  Price  .£1,000  cash,  and  .£1,000  on  mortgage. 
Ground  Rent    £85.     The  Theatre  cost  £3,500  to  build.     Fo.   s84y 

LONDON,  N. — Well-built  Hall  seating  430,  fully  equipped  and  licensed. 
Rent  £200  per  annum.  Price  £1,000,  including  generating  plant.  Lease 
five  years.     Takings   average  £2,000  per  annum.     Fo.    884b 

LONDON,  N.— Fine  Music  Hall  seating  1,400 and  standing  room.  Price  £3,000, 
for  everything  as  it  stand-.  Rent  £925.  Profits  should  easily  reach  £5,000  per 
annum.  A  remarkable  opportunity  to  obtain  possession  and  a  profitable  under- 
taking for  a  small  figure.     Fo.  683b. 

LONDON,  W.  — Coliseum,  holding  about  700.  Established  June,  1910. 
Net  profits  £500  per  annum.  Price  £2,000,  inclusive.  Everything  of  the 
latest   and   best.     Rent    £300.     Long  lease.     Freehold  can   be  bought. 

Fo.  690b 

LONDON,  W. — Cinema  Palace,  holding  capacity  400.  Average  takings 
£s\  per  week.  Expenses  about  £30.  Rent  £200.  Price  £2,000  (which  was 
the  cost  of  the  building  alone),  includes  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  2  pianos, 
organ,   Gaumont  machines,  &c.     A   bargain.     Fo.   89iy 

LONDON,  WEST-END.— One  of  the  highest  class  small  Theatres  in 
one  of  the  best  main  streets  in  the  West-end  of  London.  Although  only 
holding  about  200,  the  net  profit  is  over  £1,000  per  annum.  Price  for  the 
whole  place  as  a  going  concern,   £1,250.     A   bargain.     Fo.  992}- 

LONDON,  S.W. — A  newly  built  Theatre,  costing  over  £5,000.  Capacity 
nearly  600.  Takings  last  month,  £220.  £2,000  cash  and  balance  on  mort- 
gage includes  going  concern  and  everything  of  the  best.  Long  lease. 
Ground    Rent   £250   per   annum.     Fo.   793b 

LONDON,  S.W. — Splendid  little  Theatre,  seating  525.  Takings  average 
weekly  £22-.£23.  Lease  21  years  at  £90  per  annum.  Price  for  the  whoie 
going   concern,   £750.     Fo.  895b 

LONDON,  S.E. — Theatre,  including  freehold  Shops,  Residence,  Stabling, 
and  Land  at  rear.  The  Theatre  at  present  seats  270,  easily  enlarged  to 
seat  1,000  ;  large  enough  for  Music  Hall.  Price,  freehold,  including  the 
Theatre  as  a  going  concern,  £3,150,  part  of  which  can  remain  on  mort- 
gage  at  4!  per  cent.     Fo.   104c 

MIDDLESEX.— Theatre,  seating  300.  Rent  £125.  Price  £200.  Going 
concern.     Fo    123c 


LONDON. — Heart  of  the  West-end.  Theatre  holding  400,  and  making  a 
net  profit  of  £1,000  per  annum.  A  very  unusual  opportunity  to  acquire  a 
high-class   property.     Price  £1,000  cash,   balance  can  remain.     Fo.   140c 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  S.W.— Theatre  seating  250.  Profit  about  £150  per 
annum.  Rent  £52  on  long  lease.  Price  as  going  concern,  including 
everything,    £150.     Fo.    mc 

LONDON,  S.E. —Theatre  for  sale.  Price  £3,150,  part  of  which  can  re- 
main at  4J  per  cent.     Fo.    116c 


LONDON    SITES. 


LONDON,  W. — A  very  important  site  in  a  main  West-end  shopping 
street,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre,  where,  with- 
out doubt,  a  very  large  and  profitable  business  could  be  done.  Lease  65 
years.  Ground  Rent  £575  per  annum.  Premium  £3,000.  Really  a  most 
unusual  opportunity.     Fo.  557b 

LONDON,  W. — Crowded  West-end  thoroughfare,  a  Site  capable  of  ac- 
commodating a  very  large  Cinematograph  Theatre  to  seat  about  2,000, 
together  with  room  for  building  about  ten  Shops,  and  an  upper  part  com- 
prising Showrooms  and  Offices.  It  is  computed  that  £8,000  per  annum  net 
profit  will  be  made  from  the  rentals  to  be  derived  from  the  building,  and 
£8,000   net    profit  from    the    Cinematograph   Theatre.      Fo.  6ny 

LONDON,  W.— Main  thoroughfare  in  the  midst  of  Theatre  Land.  A 
Cinematograph  Theatre  capable  of  seating  about  1,500  can  be  built, 
together  with  shop  property,  offices,  &c.  A  net  profit  of  £12,000  per  annum 
should  easily  be  obtained.  Ground  Rent  £4,500  per  annum.  Estimated 
cost  of  building  £45,000.     Fo.   762b 

LONDON,  W. — A  Building  Site  about  40  ft.  by  107  ft.,  at  present  com- 
prising two  shops  and  upper  parts  in  about  the  only  crowded  populous 
neighbourhood  in  London  where  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  does  not  at 
present  exist.  Ground  rent  £300  per  annum.  No  premium.  Really  an  unusua 
opportunity.     Fo.  757b. 

LONDON,  W. — In  what  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  very  finest  positions 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  A  Building  Site,  90  ft.  by  100  ft.,  with  an 
entrance  from  the  main  road,  25  ft.  by  70  ft.,  which  would  form  a  Lounge 
and  Tea  Room.  All  necessary  exits  can  be  arranged,  and  a  net  profit  ot 
about  £7,000  a  year  should  easily  be  made  from  the  Theatre.  Ground 
Rent  £600  per  annum.  Premium  £3,000  payable  on  completion,  and  £4,500  in 
instalments  spread  over  a  period  ot  seven  years.     Fo.  657b. 

ISLINGTON.  — Near  the  "Angel,"  having  a  frontage  of  about  40  ft.  and  a 
depth  of  130  ft.,  offering  a  grand  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  handsome 
Theatre  in  which  a  very  large  and  remunerative  business  could  be  done.  Part 
freehold  and  part  leasehold  for  70  years,  the  Ground  Rent  of  which  is  £200  per 
annum.     Price  £7,000.      Fo.  613a. 

STREATHAM. — Main  road,  very  fine  Site  with  a  frontage  of  162  ft.  and 
a  return  frontage  of  232  ft.  Premises  are  already  built  upon  the  property 
and  are  let  to  one  of  the  chief  Banks  at  £250  per  annum,  who  can  be  re- 
tained. A  Cinematograph  Theatre  could  be  arranged  on  the  other  portion 
of  the  land,  and,  being  in  such  a  populous  neighbourhood,  a  very  large 
business  can  be  done.  Will  be  let  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £400  per  annum,  or 
freehold   £10,000.     Fo.  505a 

CAMDEN  TOWN.— An  excellent  Building  Site  with  about  40  ft.  frontage 
can  be  had  in  the  High-street,  on  lease  for  90  years,  at  a  Ground  rent  of 
£130  per  annum.     Premium    £1,200.     Fo.   8i3y 

HACKNEY.— In  a  very  fine  position  at  the  junction  of  two  main  streets, 
an  excellent  Site  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  over  i,ooo.  Ground 
Rent  £250^  per  annum,    lease  99  years.     Fo.  814a 

KING'S  CROSS. — In  the  main  road,  a  good  Site  with  a  frontage  of 
32   ft.,    widening  to   70  ft.,   with  a   depth    of    127    ft.     Ground  Rent  £380  per 


annum.     Fo.    6i4y 


STRATFORD,  High-street.— An  excellent  Site  in  this  populous 
neighbourhood,  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  1,500.  Lease  expires 
1963.     Ground   Rent   £70  per   annum.     Price  £2,000.     Fo.   519b 


30 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,   1912. 


BOROUGH    HIGH-STREET.— A   Freehold    Site,   capable    of    erecting   a 
Theatre   to  seat   about   r.ooo.     Frontage  60  ft.,   depth    no  ft.     Price  .£3,250.     | 
Extra    land  at   the   side  can   lie  added  totalling  8,000  square  ft.     Fo.    721b 


HAMPSTKAD,    High-street— A    Site,    so    ft. 
main   street.     Ground    Rent  £150  per  annum. 


by    so    ft. 
Fo.    625b 


to    be  let,    in   the 


CLAPHAM  JUNCTION.— In  the  main  street.  Fine  Site,  50  ft.  by 
100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £3,000,  might  be  let   on  a  building  lease.     Fo.  825y 

CLAPHAM,  High-street.— A  noble   corner  Site,   suitable   for  a  Theatre    or 

Music    Hall,   being   over  one    acre   in    extent.  Builumgs   are   now  erected  on 

it,    portion    of    which    could    be    utilised   or  let   off.     Ground   Rent    .£1,000. 

Lease  00  years.     The   fret  bold   will    be  sold.  Fo.    530b 

BRIXTON. — In  the  best  position.  An  exceedingly  good  Site,  suitable  for 
a  Theatre  seating  about  1,500.  Ground  Rent  £450  per  annum.  Lease  60 
years.     Fo.    731b 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  N—  A  fine  property  suitable  for  Theatre,  capable 
of  seating  about  i.ooo,  with  room  to  build  two  shops  in  addition.  Ground 
Rent  £150.     Lease  99  years.     Fo.  645b 

EUSTON-ROAD.— In  the  best  pcsition,  fine  property  capable  of  erecting 
a  Theatre  with  alterations  only,  existing  property  being  easily  adapted.  A 
Theatre  can  be  arranged  capable  of  seating  about  750.  Rent  £450  per 
annum.     Fo.    546b 

HOLLOWAY-ROAD.— In  the  very'  best  position,  a  fine  corner  Site, 
30  ft.  by  93  ft.,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  seating  about  650.  A 
very  large  business  can  be  done  in  this  important   position.     Rent  .£600. 

Fo.   848b 

BRENTFORD,  High-road— A  fine  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre,  frontage 
80  ft.,  depth  250  ft.     Price,  freehold,   £2,500.     Fo.   650b 

ACTON.— In  the  main  street,  a  very  excellent  Site,  frontage  42  ft.  6  in., 
depth  100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000.     Fo.   650b 

LONDON,  N.W.— In  a  very  fine  position  for  a  Cinematograph  theatre. 
A  Site  capable  of  a  building  to  seat  800  to  1,000,  and  having  two  very  ex- 
cellent frontages  to  the  most  important  roads  in  the  district.  Ground  Rent 
£250.  Premium  £1,600.  A  higher  ground  rent  without  a  premium  might 
be   arranged.     Fo.    563b 

WESTMINSTER.— In  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Houses  of  Parliament. 
A  grand  Site  next  door  to  important  banking  premises,  and  having  a 
frontage  of  140  ft.,  comprising  four  separate  properties  which  can  be 
adapted  for  the  purpose  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre,  or  a  new  buiKimg 
could  be  erected.  This  being  situated  in  a  very  thickly  populated  district 
offers  an  unusually  good  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  good  going  con- 
cern. Fo-  665D 

LONDON,  N.— Site  about  74  ft.  by  85  ft.  in  populous  district.  Price  tor 
the  freehold,   £2,000,    or  might   be   let  on  building  lease.     Fo.   568b 

NOTTING  HILL  GATE.-Site  35  ft.  by  75  ft.  Lease  7,  14,  or  21  years. 
Ground  Rent  £350.     Close  to  Notting   Hill   Gate  Station.     Fo.    5?6y 

BROMLEY.— Site  in  an  excellent  position,  15  ft.  3  in.  by  106  ft.  Price 
£2,500.  Fo.   676b 

WANDSWORTH  Excellent  Building  Site  in  a  very  fine  position.  I  lie 
freehold  can  be  obtained  for  £4,500,   the  major  part  of  which   can  remain. 

Fo.   879b 

SOUTH  NORWOOD.— Workshop,  25  ft.  by  100  ft.,  suitable  for  conver- 
sion into  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  56  years.  Ground  Rent  £4  10s. 
Low  price.     Would  be  let   for  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  678b 

TOTTENHAM.— Site,    25    ft.   6   in.   by   131   ft. 
£1,650.     A   very  fine  position.     Fo.  677y 


Lease  93  years.       Price 


WEST  HAM. — Site  having  an  area  of  about  10,100  square  ft.  Lease  So 
years.  Ground  Rent  £65  per  annum.  Price,  freehold,  £1,000.  Part  let 
off  for  £40  per  annum,     fo.    777b 

BRENTFORD.— Site,   18  It.  by  259  ft.     Price,   freehold,  £2,500.     Fo.   683V 

MORTLAKE.  —  Freehold  Site  in  a  very  good  position  where  a  large 
business  could  be  done.     Price  £5,500.     Fb.  582y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.— Site,  34  ft.  by  75  ft.  Lease  about  18  years. 
Rent  £180.     Price  £1,500.     Fo.  88oy 

PLAISTOW.— Site,  50  yards  from  station,  36  ft.  by  90  ft.  Good  position 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  99  years.  Ground  Rent  £75  per 
annum,  or  price,    freehold,   ^,1,500,    part  on   mortgage.     Fo.   780b 

PADDINGTON. — A  very  fine  Site  of  1,600  ft.  At  present  occupied  by  an 
excellent  building  which  could  easily  be  converted.  Will  be  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £700  a  year  with  a  premium,  or  the  freehold  would  be  sold. 
Fo.    779>' 

BOW,  E.— In  the  main  road,  trams  pass  the  door.  A  very;  good  Site  in 
the  busiest  spot,  42  ft.  frontage  by  112  ft.  6  in.  deep.  Price,  freehold, 
£600.  A  successful  Theatre  could  be  built  for  about  £2,000,  and  a  mort- 
gage could  be  arranged  for  £1,500.  There  is  only  one  other  small  Theatre 
in  the   neighbourhood,    thus  offering   an   excellent  opportunity.     Fo.   673b 


WANDSWORTH-ROAD.— Two      good      Shops,      easily 
Theatre,  36  ft.  by  64  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £900.     Fo.  995y 


adaptable      for 


BETHNAL  GREEN.— Building  Site  in  main  street.  Plans  passed  for 
Theatre  to  seat  580  and  two  Sttops.  61  ft.  by  95  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £4,500, 
or  might   be  let  at  a  ground  rent  of  £250  per  annum.     Fo.  796b 

CRICKLEWOOD.— Good  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  87  ft.  by  90.  n. 
Will  be  let  on  building  lease  at  £90  per  annum,   or  freehold  would  be   sold. 

Fo.  8g6y 

TOTTENHAM.— Freehold  premises,  28  by  126.  Ground  Rent  £70.  Price 
for  the  lease,  £1,000.     Fo.    898b 

GOLDER'S  GREEN.— Prominent  position,  Site  40  ft.  by  100  ft.  Ground 
Rent   of   £70   per  .annum   on    long  building  lease.     Fo.   998y 

EALING.— Site  in  very  good  position,  dose  to  the  railway  station.  80  ft.' 
by  200  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800.     Fo.  799b 

EALING.— Site  in  good  position,  28  ft.  by  90  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £250, 
or  ground   rent   of  £10  per  annum.     Fo.   looey 

PALMER'S  GREEN.— Corner  Site  on  the  main  tram  route.  Ground 
Rent  12s.  per  foot.     Fo.    101c 

CHILD'S  HILL. — Good  Site  in  a  first-class  position,  60  ft.  by  100  ft. 
Price  16s.   per   foot.     Fo.    loicy 

HOUNSLOW. — Main  street.  Site  64  ft.  by  165  ft.  Good  opening  here 
for   a    Theatre.     Price  £1,200  for  the  freehold.     Fo.    102c 

HAMMERSMITH.— Corner  Site,  depth  243  ft.  Freehold  will  be  sold  at 
a  low  figure.     Fo.    io2y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.— Good  position.  Building  Site,  185  ft.  by  225  tl. 
Freehold  to  be  sold;    major  portion  can   remain  on  mortgage.     Fo.    103c 

ACTON. — Site,  50  ft.  T>y  120  ft.  Freehold  £1,600,  or  a  ground  rent  of 
£80  per  annum.     Fo.   107c 

CROYDON. — Site,  close  to  High-street.  Low  ground  rent  on  building 
lease.     Fo.    io7cy 

HARROW-ROAD.— Site,  splendid  position,  36  ft.  by  136  ft.  Will  be  let 
on   lease  at  £250  per  annum.     Fo.   108c 

WESTMINSTER.— Site  in  good  position,  22  ft.  by  53  ft.  Price,  free- 
hold, £850,   or  would  be  let  at  £50  per  annum.     Fo.  io8cy 

FINSBURY,  E.C. — Site,  9,650  square  ft.  Building  lease  99  years. 
Ground  Rent   £300  per  annum.     48  ft.  by  235  ft.     Fo.    105c 

WALHAM  GREEN.— Freehold  Site,  72  ft.  by  106  ft.  Excellent  position. 
Freehold  for   sale.     Fo.   io5cy 

BETHNAL  GREEN.— Site  in  main  street,  61  ft.  by  96  ft.  Price  M.5°° 
freehold.     Ground  Rent  £250.     Will  seat  about  580.     Fo.    i:2cy 

ACTON. — Splendid  corner   Site,   really   a   valuable   position,  leading  to  a 

larger  Site  in    the  rear,    100  ft.    deep    with  frontage   of  1-1    ft.  Rent  .if    the 

corner    premises    is    £130    per    annum.        Freehold    of    site    at  rear    £1,500. 
Quite  an  unusual  opportunity.     Fo.    113c 

CHELSEA.— Site  with  two  frontages,  39  ft.  by  66  ft.  Price,  freehold, 
£700.     On  building  lease,  £35  per  annyrn.     Fo.    i22cy 

CLAPTON.— House  and  Stabling,  26  ft.   by  100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800. 

Fo.    113CV 

EALING.— Site,  60  ft.  by  120  ft.  Ground  Rent  £50.  Premium  £150. 
Long  lease.     Fo.  127c 

WESTBOURNE  GROVE.— Premises  easily  adaptable,  70  ft.  frontage  by 
40  ft.   deep,  with  back   entrance.     Rent  £600  per  annum.     Fo.    I24cy 

HARROW-ROAD.— Premises  with  an  area  of  26,433  **•  Price  jt&.ooo. 
Ground  Rent  £232,  or  would  be  let  at  £750  per  annum.     Lease  46  years. 

Fo.   i38cy 

HOME   COUNTIES. 

BEDFORDSHIRE.— A  well-built  property,  heretofore  used  as  a  Kink, 
suitable  for  conversion  to  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  with  small  expense. 
Large  seating  capacity.  Population  50,000.  Rent  £300  per  annum,  or  the 
freehold  will  be  sold  for  £4,5°°-     P°-   626b 

SURREY.— A  very  good  Theatre,  seating  750.  Takings  for  the  last  year 
over  £2,500,  net  profits  over  £1,000  a  year.  Price  for  the  whole  as  a  going 
concern,    including  everything,    £1,000.     A   bargain.     Fo.  826y 

SURREY.— Snug  little  Hall  seating  400.  Average  takings  £35  per  week. 
Making  a  net  profit  of  £600  per  annum.  Rent  £250  per  annum.  Moderate 
premium  to   include  everything,     to.   528b 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,  High  Wycombe.— A  Building  Site  at  present 
comprising  four  cottages  in  the  main  street,  with  a  large  factory  in  the 
rear,  having  a  frontage  to  another  street  ;  the  whole  of  the  property  is  now 
let  and  producing  about  £125  per  annum.  Has  a  frontage  of  50  ft.  and  a 
depth  of  50  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £2,000,  two-thirds  of  which  can  remain  on 
mortgage.     Fo.    43gb 

SURREY.— Cinematograph  Theatre  in  the  High-street,  80  ft.  by  85  ft., 
with  seating  capacity  at  present  of  only  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £600.  Rent 
£160  per  annum.     Lease  21  years.     Fo.   742b 


W*    LEACH,    high-class  "Restorations,    2>ecoratina    &    Sanitary    Morn 

DRAWINGS    AND   ESTIMATES    SUBMITTED    FKEE. 

57,   New  Compton  Street,  Charing  Cross,  W. 


'Phone : 
Gerrard  joSl 


Works  : 
Star  Court,  Sohj  Square,  W. 


March,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


31 


BERKSHIRE.  — Important  town,  a  good  Theatre,  seating  about  700. 
Lease  19  years.  Rent  £300  per  annum.  A  sound  concern  able  to  do  a 
very  large   business.     Price,  including  electric  light  plant,  £1,500.     Fo.    651b 

BERKSHIRE.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  350.  Rent  £100  per 
annum.  Lease  14  years,  which  includes  a  large  Hall  at  the  back,  let  at 
£6  per  week.     Price,   inclusive,  £700.     Fo.    752b 

OXFORDSHIRE.— A  fine  Building  Site  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a 
Theatre  to  seat  about  600.  There  is  a  splendid  opening,  and  a  large 
business  can  be  done.  Price  for  the  lease  and  vacant  possession  ,£200. 
Ground  Rent  .£125.     Fo.  552y 

SURREY,  Croydon. — A  gooa  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  just  a  few 
doors  from  the  best  and  busiest  shopping  part,  48  ft.  by  170  ft.  A  remark- 
ably good  opportunity  to  get  one  of  the  best  positions  in  this  important 
town.  Price,  freehold,  ,£3,000,  or  £2,000  for  the  999  years'  lease,  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50  per  annum.     Might  be  let  without  a  premium.     Fo.   7657 

HERTS.— In  a  first-class  town.  Population  50,000.  An  excellent  Site  in 
the  very  best  position,  close  to  the  junction  of  four  main  roads,  43  it. 
wide  by  100  ft.  deep.  A  Theatre  can  be  ereoted  for  about  £1,500,  and 
there  is  no  doubt  that  a  very  steady  and  satisfactory  business  could  be 
done.     Ground   Rent  £150  (no  premium).     Fo.   566b 

SURREY. — With  a  shopping  population  of  between  40,000  and  45,000. 
Very  excellent  Hall,  seating  about  650,  with  stage  and  every  convenience 
for  running  a  Cinematograph  Theatie  with  Turns  if  desired.  Completely 
fitted  with  seating  and  everytmng  necessary.  The  property  includes  a  resi- 
dence and  a  handsome  building  which  could  be  utilised  as  a  Club,  Dancing 
Academy,  or  any  other  business  where  a  handsome  building  is  required 
with  a  number  of  fine  rooms.  Replete  with  every  convenience,  including 
large  tennis  lawn.    Price  .£8,000.    Might  be  let  at  ^500  per  annum.     Fo.  664y 

HERTS,  St.  Albans.— Freehold  Land  ahj  Buildings  in  the  heart  of  the 
City,  50  ft.  frontage  by  300  ft.  deep,  comprising  two  large  dwelling  houses 
with  shops  and  stores.     Gardens  and  yards   at  rear.     Price  £2,750.    Fo.   766y 

KENT.— Very  good  Hall,  seating  300,  fitted  tip-up  seats,  &c.  Estab- 
lished three  years.  Takings  average  £20  per  week.  Lease  14  years.  Rent 
£275   per  annum.     Low  price  to  include  everything.     Fo.  781b 

KENT. — A  good  Hall  seating  300,  established  1909.  Fitted  tip-up  seats. 
Takings  £35  per  week.  Rent  £200  per  annum.  Price  £1,250,  to  include 
everything.     Fo.    88iy 

CROYDON.— Site,  45  ft.  by  105  ft.  Lease  74  years.  Ground  Rent  ^124 
per  annum.     Price  for  the   freehold,   £5,500.     Fo.   785b 

CROYDON.— Corner  Site,  17  ft.  6  in.  by  87  ft.  10  in.  Price,  freehold, 
£1,000.     No  theatres  in  the  vicinity.     A  good  spot  for  business.     Fo.   685y 

HERTS. — Large  town.  Theatre  seating  500.  Takings  £50  per  week. 
Net  profit  nearly  £25  per  week.  Price  for  the  whole,  including  the  build- 
ing, £3,000.     Fo.  897b 

HERTS. — Large  town.  Pioture  Theatre,  seating  750.  Price  £4,250,  half 
of  which  can  remain.     Rent  £300.     A  going  concern,,  making  good  profits. 

Fo.    114CV 

SURREY. — A  fine  Building,  having  frontage  of  62  ft.  and  a  depth  of 
168  ft.  At  present  seating  270  ;  could  be  enlarged  to  i.coo.  The  Building 
includes  a  residential  upper  part,  and  also  stabling,  which  could  easily  be 
let  off.  Price  .£3,700,  .£2,000  of  which  can  remain  on  mortgage.  Would  be 
let.     Fo.   139c 


MIDLANDS. 


DERBYSHIRE.— Skating  Rink,  frontage  48  ft.,  depth  128  ft.,  seating 
capacity   about    1,000.     Established   November,    1909.     Low  price.     Fo.   639b 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.— -Large  mining  district.  Iron  and  timber  built 
Theatre,  fitted  tip-up  seats.  Prices  6d.,  9c!.,  is.,  and  is.  6d.  Electric  light, 
own  plant.  Seat  1,000.  Built  about  six  years  ago  but  not  yet  opened  as 
Picture  Theatre.  Unusual  opportunity.  Price  £1,200  as  it  stands,  in- 
cluding everything.  Might  be  'et  for  £350  per  annum.  Freehold  can  be 
acquired.     Fo.    99oy 

WARWICKSHIRE.— A  substantially  built  Theatre,  in  a  prominent  posi- 
tion, having  a  frontage  of  164  ft.  Includes  two  lock-up  shops.  Part  let 
off  at  £100  per  annum.  Fitted  with  every  convenience.  Lease  87  years. 
Ground  Rent  £93  per  annum.  Price  £11,000,  half  of  which  can  remain  on 
mortgage.  The  profits  are  estimated  at  between  £2,500  and  £3,000  pel 
annum.     There  is  no  other  hall  within   two  miles.     Fo.    775y 

NORTHANTS.— Picture  Palace,  90  ft.  by  97  ft.,  seating  750.  Large 
town  with  100,000  population.  Average  takings  ,£60  to  £100  per  week. 
Price  for  freehold,  including  the  Theatre  as  a  going  concern,  £4,500.  A 
very  good   investment.     Fo.   997y 

DERBY'.— Corner  Site,  17,000  square  ft.  Freehold  £2,500.  Three  houses 
on  site  bring  in  £111  per  annum.     Fo.  H7cy 


NOTTINGHAM. — Site    over    9,000   square    ft.     Price    £12,000,    or    ground 
rent  £600  per   annum.     Fo.    125c 

DERBY".  — Corner    Site,    splendid     position,    90    ft.    by    173    ft.        Licences 
already  obtained.     Ground  Rent  £300.     Lease  99  years.     Premium  £3,000. 

Fo.  135c 


NORTH    OF    ENGLAND. 


LANCASHIRE.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  frontage  38  ft.,  depth  68  it., 
seating  about  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £1,000,  including  generating  plant. 
Opened  January,  191 1.     Fo.  502a 


LANCASHIRE. — The  Market  Hall  in  an  important  town,  seating  about 
1,000.  At  present  taking  nearly  £40  per  week.  An  old-established  going 
concern.  Rent  £'525  per  annum.  A  sum  of  £100  will  be  accepted  from  an 
immediate   purchaser.     Fo.    810b 

SCARBOROUGH.— A  good  Site  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  capable  of 
seating  about  600.     Price,   freehold,    £4,600.     Would   be  let.     Fo.    732b 

LANCASHIRE.— Large  town,  Theatre  established  zi  years,  making  a  net 
profit  of  £10  to  '£12  per  week.  Lease  900  years,  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £23 
per   annum.     Price  £2,500,  inclusive.     Fo.   640b 

YORKSHIRE.— A  Music  Hall  seating  1,400,  in  large  manufacturing 
town  with  population  of  over  100,000.  Price,  freehold,  including  seating 
and  all  fittings,  £2,750;  a  mortgage  can  be  arranged  for  £2,400.  Ihe 
alterations  to  comply  with  Borough  requirements  will  cost  about  ,£800. 
Fully  licensed,   including  spirits,  beer,  &c.     Fo.  658b 

DURHAM. — A  fine  Theatre  seating  1,500.  Newly  built,  September,  1910. 
The  freehold  would  be  sold  or  would  be  let  at  i.520  per  annum  with  a 
premium   of  £500.     The  only  place   of  amusement  in  the    town.     Fo.   859b 

LIVERPOOL.— A  large  Hall  seating  300,  in  a  fine  residential  part  of  the 
town,  including  dwelling  house.  Can  be  had  for  £90  per  annum  and  a 
small    premium.     A  fine   opportunity  for  a  beginner.     Fo.    788y 

YORKSHIRE.— Skating  Rink.  Large  town.  Easily  converted  into  a 
really  fine  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Price  £3,000.  Might  be  let  on  lease 
at  £500  per  annum.     Fo.  100c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,  8,500  square  ft.  Price,  freehold,  ;£8,ooo,  or  building 
lease    at  £320  per  annum.     Fo.   106c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,  6,000  square  ft.  Excellent  position.  To  let  on 
building   lease.     £400  per  annum.     Fo.   io6cy 

SHEFFIELD.— Fine  Theatre  Site,  area  18,000  square  ft.,  to  let  on 
building   lease  at  £1,000  per  annum.     Splendid    position.     Fo.    1106c 

SUNDERLAND. — Site,  7,600  square  ft.,  in  central  position.  Price,  free- 
hold, £3,500.     Fo.    no6cy 

YORKSHIRE.— Skating  Rink  in  town  with  population  of  over  40,000. 
Plans  passed  for  converting  to    a   Theatre.     Rent  £130.     Premium  £175. 

Fo.    m4cy 

LIVERPOOL.— Site,  nearly  8,000  square  ft.  Price,  freehold,  ^,7,500. 
Adjoining  property   could  be  purchased  if  further  space  desired.     Fo.   109c 

LANCASHIRE. — The  best  Theatre  in  a  large  town  could  be  purchased 
for  .£16,000,  freehold.     Remarkable    opportunity.     Fo.    io9cy 

LIVERPOOL. — Site,  nearly  10,000  square  ft.  Very  good  position. 
Price  ^23,500.     Fo.   110c 

LIVERPOOL.— Site,  8,000  square  ft.,  in  excellent  position.  Price 
£io,ooo,  freehold.     Fo.    nocy 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  40,000  square  ft.     Price  £6,75°,  freehold.     Fo.  118c 

LEEDS. — Excellent  Site,  12,000  square  ft.  Price  £45,000.  The  adjoining 
property  with   12,000  square   it.     Price  £15,000.     Fo.   115c 

LEEDS.— Good  Site,  14,000  square  ft.  Close  to  station.  Freehold.  For 
sale  at   a   low  figure.     Fo.    nscy 

LIVERPOOL.— Site  in  centre  of  city,  two  frontages.  Lease  75  years. 
Price  £7,500,    freehold.     8,000  square  ft.     Fo.    i23Cy 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  8,000  square  ft.  Price  £1,575,  freehold  90  ft.  by 
90  ft.     Adjoining  corner  building   can  be   obtained.     Fo.   119c 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  31,000  square  ft.  Price  £7,000,  including  build- 
ing producing  income.     Fo.   H9Cy 

BIRKENHEAD.— In  very  fine  position,   18,000   square  ft.     Price  £2,500. 

Fo.  120c 

SHEFFIELD.— Site,    10,000  square  ft.     Price  £5,000,  freehold.     Fo.   i2icy 


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32 


THE     CINEMA. 


March,  1912. 


BOLTON.— Site,  in  splendid  position,  at  present  occupied  by  seven 
shops.  Price,  freehold,  ,£9,500,  or  would  let  on  lease  at  £380.  i6,coo 
square  ft.     Fo.   122c 

BRADFORD. — Site,  149,000  square  ft.,  four  frontages.  Low  price  tor 
freehold.     Fo.  123c 

HULL.— Site,  94  ft.   by  94  ft.     Magnificent  corner  Site.     Freehold,   £5,000. 

Fo.   i28cy 

HULL. — Site,  684  square  tt.  Close  to  railway  station.  At  present 
having  shop,   house,  stabling,    &c.     Price  £1,500,   freehold.     Fo.   1340 

HULL.— Site,  48  ft.  by  63  ft.     Freehold,  £1,500.     Fo.  128c 

HULL.— 4,000  square   ft.     Freehold,    £2,500.     Fo.   I27cy 

BIRKENHEAD. — Site  in  a  fine  position,  12,000  square  ft.,  frontage  72  ft. 
Price  £6,400,  or  would  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  I32cy 

BIRKENHEAD.- -A  very  good  Site,  165  ft.  by  172  ft.,  with  house  built 
on  portion  of  the  property,  from  which  a  rental  of  nearly  .£300  is  being 
derived.     Price  £7,000,  freehold.     Fo.  133c 

BIRKENHEAD.— In  central  situation.  Area  23,000  square  ft.  -Price 
£10,000.     Fo.    I33cy 

SOUTH    OF    ENGLAND. 

KENT.— The  newly  built  property,  35  ft.  by  100  ft.  Now  used  as  a 
Skating  Rink,  will  cost  an  extremely  small  sum  to  convert  to  a  Cinemato- 
graph Theatre.  Rent  £300.  Lease  7,  14,  21  years.  No  premium.  If  de- 
sired, the  Skating  Rink  can  still  be  carried  on,  leaving  a  Hall  79  ft.  by 
35  ft.,  which   could  be  used  for  Cinematograph  purposes.     Fo.   508a 

KENT. — Large  seaside  resort.  An  important  property  having  a  frontage 
of  650  ft.  to  the  sea  with  a  private  Promenade.  Capable  of  accommodating, 
in  addition  to  the  Cinematograph  Theatre,  various  other  properties  for 
amusements,  together  with  shops,  &c.  Although  a  sum  of  £40,000  has  been 
expended  on  the  property,   the  freehold  will  be   sold  for  £16,000.     Fo.    722b 

HAMPSHIRE.— A  nice  little  Hall,  fitted  with  electric  light  plant,  doing 
a  large  business  with  the  Military,  being  close  to  the  Camps.  Price  .£250, 
inclusive.     Rent  £64  per  annum.     Fo.   523b 

KENT.— Cinematograph  Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  550,  in  a 
large  seaside  resort,  requiring  £250  for  furnishing.  Rent  £200  per  annum. 
Price  .£250.     Fully  licensed,  ready  for   opening  except  furnishing.     Fo.    442y 

WORTHING.— A  freehold-  Site  situated  .in  a  most  prominent  position, 
and  having  entrances  in  three  thoroughfares,  at  present  consisting  of  four 
shops  and  two  private  houses.     Easily  convertible.     Would  be  let  or  sold. 

Fo.   7446 


SOUTH  COAST. — Large  tcwn  and  well  patronised  pleasure  resort.  Cine- 
matograph Theatre  now  in  course  of  erection.  Corner  premises  with  hand- 
some entrance.  Seating  capacity  500.  Price,  freehold,  £6,000  (open  to 
offer).     Fo.   667y 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Site  in  best  part  of  the  town,  40  ft.  by  100  tt. 
Freehold,  £1,000.     Fo.  117c 

PORTSMOUTH.— Site,  good  position,  51  ft.  by  160  ft.     Freehold,  £1,000. 

Fo.   i29cy 

PORTSMOUTH.— Site,  67  ft.  by  100  ft.     Low  price  for  freehold.     Fo.  130c 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Site,  admirably  situated  for  a  Theatre.  Lease  82 
vears      Ground  Rent    £50.     Price  £6,000.     Frontage  100   ft.,  depth  80  ft. 

Fo.   132c 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Premises  with  Land,  having  Hall  and  Reception 
Rooms.     Price,    freehold,  £5,000.     Unusual  opportunity.     Fo.    I3icy 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Very  large  Hall,  easily  adaptable,  88  ft.  by  140  ft. 
Freehold,    .£7,000.       Fo.    131c 


CHANNEL  ISLANDS.— Large   town.     Theatre,   with  seating  capacity   of 
300,  to  be  sold  as  a  going  concern  for  £150.     Fo.  u6cy 


EAST    OF    ENGLAND. 


SUFFOLK.— Large  fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  Frontage  184  ft.,  depth 
7c  ft  Licensed  to  seat  2,000.  Built  two  years  ago  and  heretofore  used  as 
a  Skating  Rink.  Price,  freehold,  ,64.200.  Might  be  let.  A  really  well- 
built  property  and  easily   convertible.     Fo.   711b 

NORFOLK  —Fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  A  Cinematograph  Theatre, 
&c,  making  net  profit  of  about  £600  per  annum.  Price,  inclusive,  £1,000. 
Long  lease.     Fo.  641b 


EAST  COAST  —Well-known  seaside  town.  Large  building,  splendidly 
adapted  for  a  Cinematograph  theatre.  No  amusements  whatever  at  pre- 
sent     Price  £1,100.     Part  can   remain  on   mortgage  if   required.     Fo.  567b 


SUFFOLK.— Large   town.     Skating   Rink,   easily   adaptable, 
hold,  £3,500.     Might  be  let.     Fo.    114c      


Price,    free- 


WEST  OF    ENGLAND    &    WALES. 


CHESHIRE —Important  seaside  town  with  very  large  population. 
Splendid  Site  in  a  good  position,  31  ft-  by  100  ft.  Price  £1,600.  Freehold 
portion   can  remain.     Fo.   619a 

SHROPSHIRE  —Good  Hall  with  a  seating  capacity  of  over  400.  Price, 
freehold,  £1,500.     Offers  to  rent  will   be  submitted.     Fo.   8ny 


SHROPSHIRE— An  exceedingly  suitable  Property,  easily  convertible, 
adjoining  bank  premises,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Cinematograph 
Theatre,   about  40  ft.   by  80  ft.     Price,   freehold,  £1,500;  or  would   be  let. 

Fo.   513b 

GLAMORGAN.  — Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  about  750  with  a 
balcony.     Rent  £250.     Price,    inclusive  of   everything,   £400.     Fo.    732y 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE— A  very  good  Theatre  in  a  fine  position,  60  ft. 
by  112  ft.,  seating  900.  Rental  £650.  Lease  14  years.  Price,  including 
everything,   £8co.     Fo.   634b 

GLAMORGAN.— Moderate   sized  Hall,  seating  about   £350.       Making  a 

net   profit   of   about    £200   per   annum.     A  profit  rental    of    £65    per    annum 

would    be    accepted    without    a    premium.  On    the    property    is    an    electric 
light    generating  plant.     Fo.   840b 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE. —  Large  manufacturing  town.  A  property  situate 
in  the  best  position,  comprising  two  good  Shops  and  Hall  at  rear  with 
entrance  between  the  shops.  Can  be  extended  to  seat  750  to  800.  Lease  21 
years.  Rent  £350,  rising  to  £450  per  annum.  Price  for  the  freehold, 
£6,300.     Fo.  886b 

RHONDDA  VALLEY.— Large  town.  Substantially  built  Skating  Rink, 
175  ft.  by  65  ft.,  could  be  readily  adapted  into  a  Picture  Palace.  Within 
half   a  minute   of  the  main    tram  route.     Will  be   let  or   sold.     Fo.   672b 

DEVONSHIRE. — Very   large  town.     Picture  Theatre,   seating  425.    Profit- 
able  business.     Price  £3,000,   half   of   which  can   remain  on  mortgage. 
Fo.  799y 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Very  large  town.  Splendid  Skating  Rink. 
Area  about  14,000  square  ft.,  two  frontages,  easily  adaptable  for  Cine- 
matograph Theatre.  Rent  £800  per  annum.  Splendid  opportunity.  Centre 
of    the    town,   trams    passing   door.      Fo.    nicy 

SWINDON. — Site  in  splendid  position,  with  two  frontages,  nearly  10,000 
square  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000,   or  would  be   let  on  building  lease. 

Fo.   112C 

CHESHIRE.— Large  shipbuilding  town.  Music  Hall  for  sale.  Freehold 
at  a  low  figure.     Fo.  n8cy 

CARDIFF.— Site  in  one  of  the  best  positions  in  the  city.  Freehold  for 
sale,  or  will  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  i25cy 

BRISTOL.— Corner  Site,  95  ft.  by  99  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £2,500,  or  on 
long  lease   at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.   124c 

CARDIFF. — Exceptional  Premises,  with  three  frontages,  4,000  square  ft. 
Ground   Rent  £300,   on  long  lease.     Fo.    I26cy 

CARDIFF.— Centre  of  city,  67  ft.  by  127  ft.  Price  £2,500,  or  to  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50.     Premium  £1,500.     Fo.   126c 

SOMERSET.— Large  town.  Picture  Palace,  seating  about  400.  Price 
£200.     Rent  £2    per  week.     Fo.  793y 


IRELAND. 


ONE  OF  THE  LARGE  TOWNS.— Cinematograph  Theatre  averaging 
£35  per  week.  Price  for  the  freehold  going  concern,  £6,000.  Seating  475. 
The  property  before  being  converted  was  let  at  £350  per  annum.  The 
owner  might  let  at  a  rental  with  a  small  premium.     Fo.  810b 


SCOTLAND. 


GLASGOW.  — Handsome  Theatre,  80  ft.  by  130  ft.  Seating  1,700,  taking 
nearly  £50  per  week.     Price  inclusive  for  this  valuable  going  concern,  £600. 

Fo.    429b 

GLASGOW.— Cinematograph  Theatre.  Frontage  45  ft.,  depth  90  ft.  At 
present  seating  only  550.  Taking  about  £25  per  week,  under  management. 
Expenses  about  £18  per  week.  Price  £850  for  everything,  which  includes 
the  residence  on   the  property.     Fo.   533b 

EDINBURGH.— Hall  with  seating  capacity  of  350,  fitted  complete. 
Books  can  be  inspected.  No  opposition  in  the  district.  Rent  £100  per 
annum.     Price  £230,  to  include  everything.     Fo.  787b 

FINANCE   &    INVESTMENTS. 

CASH  READY  for  the  purpose  of  financing  responsible  people  for 
building  Cinematograph  Theatres.  £18,000  at  once  available.  Must  be  in 
good  positions  and  bear  closest  investigation.  Apply  Messrs.  Robert 
Wright  and  Co.,  Chartered  Accountants,  9  and  10,  Pancras-lane,  E.C. 
Marked  (Theatres).  

SEATS. — A  quantity  of  seating  for  sale.  Advertiser  just  bought  Hall,  fs 
refitting  and  has  450  tip-up  seats  in  plush,  in  excellent  condition,  to  be  sold 
at  a  very  low  price.  G.  B.,  Box  33,  The  Cinema,  21,  Nortji  Audley- 
street,   W. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


A  NEW  HARPER'S  Ticket  Machine  for  sale,  with  1,000  Metal  Tickets. 
Cost  £16.     Price  £8.     Apply  box  231,  Office  of  The  Cinema. 

A  TWO-MAN  UAL  and  Pedal  Pipe  Organ,  by  leading  maker,  for  sale,  with  14 
stops,  automatic  player,  and  a  motor  blower.  Cost  £350.  Price  £225.  Apply 
Box  232,  Office  of  The  Cinema. 


Drl„toj   kv  cT    Cifments  Press,  Limited,  Portugal  Street,    Kingsway,  W.C.,  and  published    by  the  Proprietors,  the  Cinema  News  &  Property 
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Supplement    to    the     "CINEMA,"     April    1st,    1912. 


Selics  Christopher  Columbus. 


EXCLUSIVE      RIGHTS      HELD      BY 


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April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


-YOU    SAVE 


MONEY 

ON     PICTURE     THEATRE     EQUIPMENT 

and    Reduction   in    Electricity  Accounts 

BY    CONSULTING 

Mr    JAMES  W.  BARBER,  A.M.I.E.E., 

Independent  Consulting  Electrical  and  Cinematograph  Engineer 

(Author  of  "The  Bioscope  Electrician's  Handbook," 
"  Alternating  Currents,"  etc.,  etc.) 

Schemes   fieared   and   advice  given  on  all    Picture  Theatre  Equipment. 
Inspections  and   Insurance  of  Electrical   Plant  against  Breakdown,  etc. 

Audrkss-ARGYLE    CHAMBERS, 
106,     CHARING     CROSS     ROAD,     LONDON,     W.C. 


Every  operator  should  possess  a  copy  of  "  The  Bioscope  Elec- 
trician's Handbook." — "The  Operator's  Vade  Mecum"  (vide  Press), 
1-  post  free  fro ■»  the  above.  Also  "Alternating  Currents— Their 
Nature  and  Their  Uses."  —A  Practical  Manual  for  the  Bioscope 
Operator.  6^d.  post  free.  Tel.  1259S  Central. 


FILMS  CLEANED  &  REPAIRED 

BY  CHEMICAL    PROCESS. 

3s.    pep    1,000    feet    inclusive. 

We  are  Cleaning  for  the  Trade  all  over  the  World. 


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And  Repairs  of  Every  Description  promptly  done  by  Experienced  Workmen. 


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Films  sent  for  at  9  a.m.  returned  Cleaned 
and  Repaired  by  6  o'clock  in  the  Evening. 


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Telephone  9768  Gerrard. 


The  "Allefex"  is  a  sound-effects  machine  for  accompanying 
moving  pictures.  More  than  30  different  eflects,  which  can  all  be 
worked  by  one  man.  All  the  effects  of  land,  sea  and  sky, 
including  battles,  trains,  motor  cars,  horses,  lightning,  etc.,  etc. 
Call  and  hear  it,  or  write  for  illustrated  list. 


Andrews'  Film  Hire  Service  is  thoroughly  Up-to-date.  The  whole 
of  the  films  released  weekly  in  England  are  reviewed  by  our  own 
buyer  who  devotes  his  whole  lime  to  the  work.  Programs  to 
suit  all  classes  of  Picture  Theatres  at  the  lowest  possible  prices. 
May  we  submit  particulars  and  specimen  programs? 


ANDREWS'  PICTURES,  L 


TD.     CINE   HOUSE,    GREEK    STREET, 
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GET   OUR    PRICE    FOR   YOUR 

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THE     CINEMA. 


April,   1912. 


Bioscope 
Outfitters 

and 

Film 
Hirers. 


Personal 
and 
Prompt 
Attention. 


RELIABLE 
QUALITY. 


The  Pioneer  Film 

Agency Limited, 

27,    Cecil    Court,    Charing 
Cross  Road,  LONDON,  W.C. 


Telephones — 
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Night  Line— 134  North. 


Tel.  Address : 

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-    OUR   FEATURE   IS    - 

15/-  per  1,000  feet, 

or  write  for  our  Suggested 
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All  Feature  Films  Lowest  Price. 

WRITE    AT    ONCE. 


TELEPHONE:    1280  HOLBORN. 


E.P.Allam&Co., 

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28,  GRAY'S  INN  ROAD,  HOLBORN,  W.C. 

(Established    21   Years.) 


Specialists   in  Arc   and   Incandescent 
Lighting  for  Cinematograph  Theatres, 

HEATING,  VENTILATING, 

SIGNS,    MOTORS,    and 

GENERATORS. 


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BUILDERS  &    CONTRACTORS. 


We  are  prepared  to  estimate  free 
of    all    charge    for    the  erection  of 

HIGH- CLASS 

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We    undertake   all    descriptions   of 
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tive  will  wait   upon  clients  to  take 

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ARE 

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RENTED    TO 

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«! 


To  "Star"  an  Exclusive  Feature  Film 
is  the  ideal  method  of  attracting  the 
public  to  picture  theatres  —  to  your 
picture  theatre — and  the  better  the  film 
and  the  more  it  complies  with  the 
demand  of  the  people  for  sensational 
subjects,  the  greater  will  be  its  success. 
We  are  handling  a  number  of  these 
"  Winning  Exclusives,"  and  will  be  glad 
oftheopportunity  tosendfull  particulars. 
Please  remember  that  all  our  films  are 
rented  on  the  "One  Hall  per  Town" 
principle  and  therefore  cannot  be 
duplicated  by  your  competitors. 


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THE     CINEMA    NEWS    AND     PROPERTY     GAZETTE,    APRIL,    Igi2. 


RUFFELLS 


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NEWS    AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE. 

A  MONTHLY  MAGAZINE  OF  IMPORTANCE  TO  ALL  INTERESTED  IN  THE  CINEMATOGRAPH  WORLD 

Edited    bv    Low    Warren. 


No.  3.     Vol.  I. 


APRIL,    1912. 


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EDITORIAL    AND    BUSINESS   NOTICES. 

THE  CINEMA  News  and  Property  Gazette  is  published  on  the  6rst  of  each 
month.  Copies  can  be  obtained  through  any  Newsagent  or  Railway  Bookstall 
in  Town  or  Country,  or  will  be  sent  direct  from  the  Office  for  2s.  per  annum, 
post  free. 

News  items  of  interest  to  those  engaged  in  the  Cinematograph  Industry  will 
be  welcomed,  and  communications  should  reach  the  Office  not  later  than  the 
26th  of  the  month,  it  intended  for  publication  in  the  following  month's  issue. 

Articles,  photographs,  or  drawings  intended  for  publication  must  be  accom- 
panied by  a  stamped,  addressed  envelope,  in  case  of  return,  but  the  Editor  will 
not  be  responsible  for  the  safe  return  ot  rejected  MS.,  photographs,  or  drawings, 
though  every  care  will  be  taken  of  them. 

Editorial  communications,  which  should  always  be  accompanied  by  the  name 
and  address  of  the  sender,  should  be  addressed  to  the  Editor. 


All   enquiries   respecting    Advertisements  and   business   matters    should    be 
addressed  to  the  Manager,  at  the  Offices  of  The  Cinema, 

21,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford  Street,  W. 

Wires:  "Faddist,  London."  'Phones:  Gerrard  7676  &  8798. 


Picture  Palaces  and  the  Coal  Strike. 

AS  the  coal  strike  effected  picture  palaces 
throughout  the  country  to  any  great  extent  ? 
At  the  time  of  writing  it  has  not.  According 
to  reports  received  from  different  parts  of  the 
country  picture  theatres  have  been  doing  an 
unusually  good  business  during  the  last  two  or  three 
weeks.  It  cannot  be  gainsaid,  however,  that  the  country 
is  passing  through  a  very  grave  crisis.  The  closing  of 
the  coal  mines  has  not  only  thrown  hundreds  of  thousands 
of  men  out  of  work,  but  it  has  also  affected  many  other 
industries  which  rely  upon  coal  for  their  existence.  The 
enormous  amount  of  unemployment  is  the  most  serious 
outcome  of  the  present  industrial  upheaval,  and,  if  one 
can  read  the  signs  of  the  times  aright,  further  trouble 
may  be  looked  for  in  the  very  near  future. 

<•- 
The  Value  of  Foresight. 

Picture  theatres  have  not  yet  begun  to  feel  the  draught, 
but  in  common  with  every  other  place  of  amusement 
they  are  certain  to  do  so  in  the  near  future,  unless  an 
early  settlement  of  differences  is  arrived  at  between 
masters  and  men.  As  soon  as  the  price  of  living 
necessaries  advances,  places  of  amusement  will  be  the 


very  first  to  feel  the  effect  of  the  shortage  of  money. 
So  far  the  curtailment  of  railway  facilities  has  not 
interfered  with  the  dispatch  of  films,  north,  south,  east 
and  west  and  the  renters  are  to  be  congratulated  upon 
the  exemplary  manner  in  which  they  have  risen  to  the 
occasion.  A  word  of  warning,  however,  is  necessary  to 
the  exhibitor,  and  I  feel  that  it  is  only  right  to  impress 
upon  the  proprietors  of  cinema  theatres  throughout  the 
country  that  they  must  anticipate  increasing  difficulty  in 
getting  delivery  of  their  films  if  the  present  disturbed 
state  of  affairs  continues.  Railway  facilities  are  being 
cut  down  in  every  direction,  and  in  face  of  possible 
emergencies  I  strongly  advise  every  exhibitor  to  so 
arrange  that  he  has  a  reserve  programme  upon  which  to 
fall  back,  in  case  his  supplies  fail  him.  As  the  business 
is  at  present  organised,  supply  is  one  of  a  hand-to-mouth 
character  ;  at  present  one  programme  has  to  be  re- 
turned before  another  is  received.  On  this  account  I 
foresee  the  danger  ot  some  managers  who  are  not  suffi- 
ciently wide-awake  finding  themselves  high  and  dry  in 
the  event  of  further  transport  difficulties. 

«•- 

Only  in  one  or  two  isolated  cases  have  cinema  theatres 
had  to  close  as  an  indirect  result  of  the  strike,  owing  to 
the  shortage  of  power.  But,  on  the  whole,  the  national 
crisis  through  which  we  are  at  present  passing  does  not 
seem  at  the  moment  to  have  seriously  affected  the  takings 
of  the  theatre  proprietor.  For  the  sake  of  the  community 
generally,  and  the  industry  in  which  we  are  all  interested, 
it  is  to  be  hoped  that  a  via  media  will  be  discovered 
without  further  loss  of  time,  and  that  business  may 
soon  assume  a  normal  aspect. 

(•^ 
The  Cinema  Censorship. 

It  appears  as  if  the  appointment  of  a  cinema  Censor  is 
inevitable.  We  have  it  from  an  official — and  therefore 
absolutely  reliable  source — that  the  appointment  of  a  film 
Censor  is  already  being  discussed  by  the  authorities.  We 
are  assured    by  our    informant,  whose   position    should 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,    1912. 


enable  him  to  form  a  very  sound  and  shrewd  judgment  on 
the  question,  that  it  is  only  a  matter  of  months  before 
the  film  industry  is  placed  under  official  regulation, 
despite  the  Home  Office  discussion  with  a  deputa- 
tion of  gentlemen  representing  the  Trade  last  month, 
urging  the  necessity  for  appointing  an  official  whose 
business  it  would  be  to  license  all  films  released 
in  this  country  for  exhibition.  In  view  of  this  information 
I  feel  it  incumbent  upon  me  to  urge  manufacturers  to 
lose  no  time  in  formulating  their  own  scheme  for  control- 
ling the  business.  Elsewhere  in  this  issue,  Mr.  Hep- 
worth, of  the  Hepworth  Manufacturing  Company,  outlines 
brieflv  what  this  scheme  is.  Minor  details  remain  to  be 
decided  upon,  but  in  the  rough  the  scheme  should  com- 
mend itself  to  the  trade  generally,  and  undoubtedly  it 
would  be  a  wise  move  to  place  the  scheme  before  the 
Home  Secretary  without  delay,  otherwise  we  may  find 
ourselves  hampered  by  a  number  of  irritating  conditions 
which  could  easily  have  been  avoided  had  we  only  moved 
at  the  right  time.     The  right  time  is  now. 

<*- 
The   Trade    to    Act. 

Since  the  above  notes  were  in  type  I  understand  that 
the  three  Trade  associations  have  met  and  discussed  the 
Censor  question,  and  as  the  outcome  of  their  delibera- 
tions there  is  every  probability  that  a  paid  Board  of 
Examiners  will  be  appointed  in  the  near  future.  A 
prominent  individual,  whose  name  will  command  respect 
in  all  quarters,  will  act  as  the  official  film  censor,  and 
several  strong  regulations,  which  will  eventually  prove 
most  beneficial  to  the  Trade,  have  already  been  framed. 
This  is  at  it  should  be,  and  the  representatives  of  the 
Manufacturers',  Renters'  and  Exhibitors'  Associations 
are  to  be  congratulated  upon  the  successful  outcome  of 
their  united  negotiations.  This  move  by  the  Trade  will 
no  doubt  have  its  effect  in  Official  quarters. 

English  Films  Score. 

The  English  film  is  rapidly  coming  into  its  own. 
Signs  are  apparent  on  every  side  that  the  average 
picture  theatre  audience  loves  a  good  story  with  an 
English  background.  A  somewhat  daring  experiment, 
which  however  resulted  in  a  most  complete  success,  has 
just  been  carried  out  by  the  proprietor  of  the 
Picturedrome,  Harrow,  who  presented  a  programme 
entirely  composed  of  all-British  pictures  throughout  the 
week,  changing  the  pictures  as  usual  on  Thursday.  The 
subjects  showed  presented  a  range  of  every  emotion,  from 
grave  to  gay,  and  certainly  reflected  credit  upon  whoever 
was  responsible  for  their  selection.  We  note  with 
pleasure  that  the  firms  represented  in  this  "  All-British 
Picture  Programme "  included  the  Hepworth  Manu- 
facturing Company  (five  films),  Messrs.  Cricks  and 
Martin  (five  films),  and  the  Clarendon  Company  (seven 
films).  We  gather  that  the  audience  was  completely 
satisfied — as  they  had  every  reason  to  be — by  the 
excellent  programme  put  before  them,  and  the  experiment 
proved  so  successful  that  other  exhibitors  would  be  well 
advised  to  do  likewise. 

<•- 
A  Forthcoming  Social  Function. 

The  "All-British"  film  is  booming  just  now.  In 
order  to  popularise  as  well  as  familiarise  the  prominent 
film   characters,  a  number  of  English  firms  are,  I  under- 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


stand,  endeavouring  to  organise  a  big  fancy  dress  ball — 
or,  if  the  weather  be  favourable,  a  fancy  dress  garden 
party — introducing  such  wel  -known  picture  people  as 
Lieutenant  Daring,  R.N.,  Muggins,  V.C.,  Tilly  the 
Tomboy,  Nat  Pinkerton,  Lieutenant  Rose,  etc.  The 
idea  of  the  promoters  is  to  bring  the  English  characters 
prominently  before  the  buyers,  and  the  function  is,  I 
believe,  being  organised  by  Mr.  J.  O'Neil  Farrell,  of  the 
B.  and  C.  Company.  It  is  hoped  that  arrangements  will 
be  sufficiently  far  forward  for  it  to  take  place  in  the  near 
future.  If  indoors  Holborn  Town  Hall  has  been 
provisionally  decided  upon,  and  if  out  of  doors  it  will 
take  place  at  one  of  the  large  studios. 

A  Noteworthy  Enterprise. 

Quite  the  most  noteworthy  feature  of  the  current 
month  is  the  release  of  the  mammoth  Selig  him 
"  Christopher  Columbus  "  on  April  8th.  Full  reference 
has  already  been  made  to  this  great  undertaking  in  these 
columns,  but  I  feel  that  a  word  of  hearty  congratulation 
is  due  to  the  New  Century  Film  Service,  Ltd.,  for  the 
enterprise  which  led  them  to  secure  the  entire  English 
rights  of  this  "  exclusive,"  and  they  are  most  assuredly 
entitled  to  all  the  kudos  which  their  spirited  action  and 
pluck  brings  them.  I  am  glad  to  know  the  booking  is 
going  strong  and  everything  points  to  the  fact  that  Mr. 
Dickson  is  going  to  score  a  huge  triumph  for  his 
company. 

<#- 

A  Carefully  Thought-out  Campaign. 

"  Christopher  Columbus "  is  a  great  film  in  every 
sense  of  the  word,  and,  realising  that  they  have  a  "  dead 
cert.,"  the  New  Century  Film  Service  is  leaving  nothing 
to  chance.  No  "  exclusive  "  has  ever  been  more 
thoroughly  or  carefully  boomed.  The  printing  matter 
is  of  the  best,  the  organisation  necessary  to  deal  with  it 
has  been  most  systematically  built  up,  and  the  issue  of  a 
"  Manual  of  Instruction  "  to  exhibitors,  telling  them  in 
detail  how  to  approach  the  local  press,  the  clergy,  the 
education  authorities  and  others,  is  one  of  the  cleverest 
moves  in  this  admirably  thought-out  campaign,  and 
certainly  one  which  every  exhibitor  will  appreciate. 
Elsewhere  in  this  issue  appears  a  brief  chat  with  Mr. 
Dickson,  of  the  New  Century  Film  Service,  in  which  he 
gives  details  of  the  many  and  various  methods  which 
his  firm  are  adopting  in  order  to  boom  this  historic  film. 
Meanwhile,  a  final  word  of  congratulation  upon  the 
complete  success  which  attended  the  private  view  at 
the  Court  Theatre,  Tottenham  Court  Road,  which  was 
largely  attended  by  exhibitors,  who  displayed  unusual 
enthusiasm  as  the  film  unfolded  the  story  of  Columbus 
and  his  great  adventure.  It  was  perfectly  shown,  the 
effects  were  excellent,  and  the  incidental  music  charm- 
ing and  singularly  appropriate. 

<•- 
An  Imperial  Cinema. 

One  of  the  latest  of  the  many  presents  which  the 
Kaiser  makes  to  his  grandchildren  is  a  cinematograph, 
which  has  been  installed  in  an  unoccupied  nursery  at 
Potsdam,  with  a  qualified  operator  to  work  it.  In  reality 
the  grown-ups  in  the  Imperial  palace  are  enjoying  the 
"  show  "  far  more  than  "  Willy,"  "  Ferdy,"  or  "  Louis  " 
Hohenzollern,  not  to  mention  the  Crown  Prince's  fourth 


THE    GREAT    MOMENT    has   come    for    you   to    book    that 
sensational  film,  "GIPSY  BLOOD,"  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  3. 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


son,  as  yet  unchristened.  The  Emperor  is  particularly 
interested  in  a  series  of  pictures  of  Agadir  just  landed 
from  the  famous  cruiser  Berlin,  which,  by  the  way,  after 
nearly  bringing  nn  a  European  war,  is  to  be  broken  up 
for  firewood.  Films  of  the  Imperial  family  at  work  and 
at  play  are  being  taken  from  day  to  day,  and  it  is  be- 
coming quite  a  recognised  daily  item  in  the  routine  of  the 
household  to  visit  room  No.  143  and  see  the  latest 
pictures.  One  evening,  it  is  related,  the  Emperor,  who 
is  very  fond  of  playing  practical  jokes,  stood  at  the 
nursery  door  and  demanded  admission  money. 

<«- 
Press  and  Public. 

The  dictum  of  Mr.  Justice  Phillimore  in  a  recent 
case  in  the  Divisional  Court,  when  application  was  made 
for  a  writ  of  attachment  to  issue  against  an  editor  for 
contempt  of  court  in  publishing  comments  subsequent  to 
service  of  a  writ  for  libel,  is  of  the  utmost  importance  to 
the  newspaper  Press  as  a  body.  His  lordship  in  deliver- 
ing judgment  said  :  To  say  that  a  newspaper  is  to  be 
restrained  from  expressing  its  opinions  of  a  man  who 
bulks  largely  in  the  public  eye  from  the  moment  that  the 
writ  has  been  served  till  the  date  of  the  trial  of  the  action 
— a  date  which  must  be  to  a  considerable  extent  in  the 
hands  of  the  plaintiff — is  to  say  that  which  is  a  very 
great  restriction  upon  the  freedom  of  the  Press,  and 
likely  in  many  cases  to  be  fraught  with  danger  to  the 
public.  One  had  to  reconcile  two  rights — the  right  of  free 
speech  and  free  printing  and  publishing,  and,  on  the 
other  hand,  the  private  right  of  the  individual  suitor  to 
have  his  case  fairly  treated.  The  only  way  in  which  the 
Court  could  safeguard  these  rights  was  by  refusing  un- 
limited extension  to  either. 

(•^ 

The  Annual  Trade  Dinner. 

The  fourth  annual  Cinematograph  Trade  Dinner  will 
take  place  at  the  Hotel  Cecil  on  April  16,  under  the 
auspices  of  the  Manufacturers',  Renters'  and  Exhibitors' 
Associations.  The  Dinner  Committee  consists  of  Mr. 
J.  Williamson  (Chairman),  and  Messrs  J.  Avery,  R.  S. 
Edmondson,  E.  H.  Montagu,  J.  Parry,  T.  Power, 
L.  Schlentheim,  A.  J.  Gale,  and  F.  W.  Ogden-Smith. 
Tickets  (10s.  6d.  each)  may  be  obtained  from  any 
member  of  the  Committee,  or  from  the  Secretary,  Mr. 
E.  J.  Muddle,  16,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  W. 
Sir  Ernest  Shackleton,  the  well-known  explorer,  will 
preside. 

<+- 
The  Limit  Reached. 

The  movement  to  limit  the  number  of  picture  halls 
and  theatres  in  Newcastle  continues.  Recently  a  de- 
putation representing  the  theatres,  music  halls  and 
picture  palaces  in  the  northern  city  waited  upon  the 
Town  Improvements  Committee,  and  presented  a 
petition  signed  by  the  representatives  of  the  majority  of 
owners  of  theatres,  music  halls  and  picture  halls  in 
Newcastle.  The  object  was  to  call  the  attention  of  the 
authorities  to  the  fact  that  there  are  now'  25  cinemato- 
graph licences  in  Newcastle  and  the  strain  of  competition 
is  getting  too  great.  The  committee  was  not  asked  to 
refuse  all  new  licences  in  future,  but  to  consider  each 
case  on  its  merits  as  to  whether  the  new  hall  was 
wanted  or  not  in  the  particular  district  under  consider- 
ation. 

THE  GREAT  MOMENT  has  come  for  you  to  book  that 
sensational  film,  "GIPSY  BLOOD,'  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  3. 


"The  Cinematograph  Eye." 

One  thought  of  "  rlickeritis  "  and  all  sorts  of  terrible 
diseases  of  the  eye,  when  the  above  heading  attracted 
one's  attention  in  the  Newcastle  Chronicle.  "What 
"  the  cinematograph  eye  "  actually  is,  according  to  our 
contemporary,  we  leave  the  following  extract  to  tell : 
"  On  a  hoarding  this  week,"  it  says,  "there  are  pictures 
of  scenes  from  a  pictorial  play  which  the  cinematograph 
is  showing  at  a  local  hall.  At  first  glance  this  film 
illustration  suggests  an  exciting  incident  in  a  melodrama 
played  in  the  ordinary  way,  or  something  descriptive  of 
a  serial  story  in  a  popular  weekly,  but  you  identify  the 
picture  as  belonging  to  the  picture  halls  by  the  eyes  of 
the  persons  depicted  upon  it ;  each  individual  has  the 
cinematograph  eye — wild,  staring,  demoniacal."  If  the 
writer  had  only  proceeded  a  little  further,  and  used  a 
little  mixed  metaphor  he  might  perhaps  have  described 
it  as  the  shouting  eye.     Hi  ! — Hi  !  ! 

L.C.C.  Tribute. 

A  tribute  to  the  quality  of  the  films  exhibited  at 
Metropolitan  cinematograph  theatres  was  forthcoming  at 
the  recent  meeting  of  the  London  County  Council.  A 
member  asked  whether  the  theatre  and  music-hall 
inspectors  had  been  instructed  to  report  on  the  ch  racter 
of  objectionable  cinematograph  films,  and  if  so,  whether 
such  reports  were  being  received  and  considered  by  the 
Theatres  and  Music-halls  Committee.  The  Chairman 
replied  that  inspectors  employed  by  the  Council  to 
report  on  the  character  of  performances  made  inspections, 
but  only  when  they  received  definite  instructions  from 
the  committee  with  regard  to  a  specified  place  or  places. 
Such  instructions  were  given  only  when  the  committee 
had  reason  to  think  that  a  particular  entertainment  was 
or  might  be  objectionable.  Thirteen  inspections  had 
been  made,  but  in  no  case  was  it  necessary  to  take  action 
in  regard  to  the  matter  of  the  films  exhibited. 

<•- 
An  Important  Legal  Decision. 

The  fact  that  a  cinematograph  theatre  introduces 
variety  turns  between  the  pictures  does  not  constitute  it 
a  music  hall.  This  was  the  ruling  of  Judge  Woodfall  at 
Westminster  County  Court  in  an  interesting  case  raising 
the  point.  The  plaintiffs  were  the  Automatic  Time- 
Table  Co.,  Ltd.,  and  the  defendants  the  Bolton  Theatre 
Entertainments  Co.,  Ltd.  The  claim  was  for  £11  is. 
under  two  contracts  for  advertising  one  of  the  defendants' 
theatres  on  an  automatic  time-table  machine.  By  an 
agreement  no  other  music  hall  was  to  be  advertised  on 
the  machine.  Later  an  advertisement  of  the  Paragon 
cinematograph  hall,  Bolton,  appeared  on  the  machine. 
The  point  in  dispute  was  whether  this  hall  could  be 
described  as  a  music  hall.  The  plaintiffs  contended  that 
it  was  a  picture  palace,  pure  and  simple,  and  could  not, 
therefore,  be  described  as  a  music  hall.  Evidence  was 
given  that  variety  turns  were  introduced  into  the 
programme,  but  an  expert  witness  said  he  would  still 
class  it  as  a  picture  palace.  Judge  Woodfall,  in  giving 
his  decision,  said  :  They  might  introduce  these  variety 
turns,  just  to  break  the  monotony,  but  the  defendants 
had  failed  to  prove  that  this  constituted  a  music  hall, 
and  the  plaintiffs  could  say  that  they  had  committed  no 
breach  of  contract.  He,  therefore,  gave  judgment  for 
the  plaintiffs. 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


No.    Ill THE    SCALA   THEATRE.— MR.    CHARLES    URBAN. 


THE  Scala  Theatre,  the  London  home  of  Kine- 
macolor  in  Charlotte  Street,  W.,  has  been  the 

means  of  introducing  a   new    public   to    the 

moving  picture. 

When  Mr.  Charles  Urban,  the  leader  in 
many  important  developments 
in  cinematography,  notably 
the  educational  and  travel 
film  in  the  early  days,  and 
more  recently  the  new  science 
of  motion  pictures  in  natural 
colours,  committed  himself  to 
his  bold  experiment  of  pre- 
senting a  complete  program  me 
of  pictures  under  the  con- 
ditions and  at  the  prices  that 
prevail  at  West  End  theatres, 
he  relied  upon  attracting  a 
special  class  of  people  to  his 
theatre. 

From  a  long  experience 
gained  during  the  years  that 
he  was  responsible  for  the 
bioscope  displays  at  the  Al- 
hambra  and  the  Palace 
Theatres,  Mr.  Urban  came 
to  the  conclusion,  which  has 
since  proved  to  be  amply 
justified,  that  the  "stalls"  are 
interested  in  pictures  if  they 
are  put  before  them  under 
conditions  to  which  they  are 
accustomed. 

Conception  of  an  Idealist. 

The  Scala  Theatre,  of  the 
interior  of  which  an  illustra- 
tion appears  on  this  page,  is  the  conception  of  an  idealist, 
and  is  the  work  of  the  well-known  architect,  Mr.  Frank 
T.  Verity,  F.R.I.B.A.  More  than  any  other  theatre  in 
London  it  consults  the  comfort  of  the  audience,  even  at 
some  sacrifice  of  seating  accommodation.  The  continu- 
ous show  is  unknown  here.  Performances  are  given 
twice  daily,  and  last  for  three  hours  each.  The  stage- 
management  of  the  show  is  what  will  appeal  to  the 
visitor  who  knows  something  about  entertainment  from 
behind  the  scenes.     Each  picture  is  introduced  in  a  few 


THE    SCALA    THEATRE. 


short  phrases  by  a  gentleman  who  also  makes  any 
necessary  explanations  during  the  projection  of  the 
subject.  There*  is  a  full  orchestra,  under  able  leader- 
ship, which  discourses  excellent  music  during  all 
pictures  suited  to  such  an  accompaniment.  An  "effects  " 

worker  of  considerable  skill 
does  much  to  complete  the 
realism  of  the  Kinemacolor 
subjects,  already  superbly 
lifelike  by  reason  of  their 
endowment  of  natural  colour. 

The  Question  of  "Effects." 

No  expense  is  spared  by 
the  management  to  add  to  the 
effect  of  the  pictures  or  the 
entertainment  of  the  audience. 
Pipers  and  a  drum  and  fife 
band  are  maintained  at  the 
present  moment  in  order  to 
improve  the  presentation  of  a 
single  reel  of  the  Indian  series, 
which  is  drawing  such  large 
and  enthusiastic  audiences  to 
the  Scala.  A  choir  of  vocalists 
is  in  attendance,  though  their 
duties,  it  may  be,  only  consist 
in  rendering  a  stave  of  the 
National  Anthem  during  the 
performance. 

The  twice-weekly  change 
of  programme,  which  seems 
to  have  got  the  rest  of  the 
picture  houses  in  its  grip, 
finds  no  recognition  at  the 
Scala.  Apart  from  the  fact 
that  the  theatre  draws  its 
audience  from  the  whole  of  London  instead  of  from  the 
immediate  locality,  so  attractive  are  the  Kinemacolor 
pictures  to  many  of  the  patrons  that  they  come  to  see 
the  same  programme  time  after  time.  The  Coronation, 
the  Unveiling  of  the  Queen  Victoria  Memorial,  and  the 
Investiture  at  Carnarvon  remained  in  the  programme 
for  many  months  last  year  and  never  failed  to  win  the 
most  enthusiastic  plaudits.  As  far  as  the  signs  of  the 
times  can  be  read  at  present,  we  may  be  seeing  their 
Majesties'  Indian  Tour  at  the  Scala  at  Christmas. 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


Wide  Field  of  Enterprise. 

There  can  be  little  doubt  that  there  is  room  in  London 
for  at  least  one  more  Kinemacolor  theatre  on  the  lines 
of  the  Scala,  and  for  similar  institutions  in  all  the  large 
provincial  towns.  Kinemacolor  opens  up  a  very  wide 
field  in  this  as  in  many  other  directions,  and  the  next 
few  months  may  see  important  developments. 

Mr.  Alfred  Corrick,  who  is  in  charge  of  the  Scala 
enterprise,  has  the  ability  and  enterprise  necessary  for 
the  position.  He  was  formerly  treasurer  at  the 
Alhambra,  but  he  is  an  fait  with  every  side  of  theatrical 


CORRESPONDENCE. 


To  the  Editor  of  The  Cinema. 

Sir, — Mr.  Valentine  Pullin  deserves  the  thanks  of  all  profes- 
sional musicians  in  drawing  attention  in  your  February  issue 
to  the  music  (?)  so  often  heard  in  the  most  beautiful  picture 
theatres.  Personally,  I  do  not  think  the  finest  music  too  good 
for  such  places.  When  we  hear  of  films  costing  over  /6,ooo, 
and  taking  three  years  to  make,  I  think  that  commonplace 
music  ground  out  to  it  by  a  very  mediocre  musician  little 
short  of  desecration.    What  say  your  readers? 

I  have  just  written  a  book  on  ''  Playing  to  Pictures  "  which 
is  calculated  to  meet  all  requirements.  Sooner  or  later  picture 
theatre  owners  must  realise  the  importance  of  really  good 
music  if  they  wish  to  maintain  a  good  show.  There  will  be 
no  help  for  it  !  Perhaps  when  a  few  more  companies  get  in 
Queer-street  others  will  wake  up  to  the  fact  that  quality  and 
not  cheapness  must  dominate  the  musical  part  of  the  show. 
Wishing  your  paper  every  success, 


Yours  faithfullv, 


W.  Tvacke  George. 


APPROPRIATE    MUSIC. 
To  the  Editor  of  The  Cinema. 
Sir, — I   was  rather  astonished  to  see  a  letter  in  your  last  issue 
on  the  question  of  appropriate  music  in  cinematograph  theatres. 

I  am  a  frequent  visitor  to  cinema  theatres,  and  I  think  the  music 
in  most  cases  appropriate  to  the  films.  In  fact  I  consider  the  musical 
accompaniment  a  great  attraction,  especially  in  the  theatres  in  the 
neighbourhood  of  Clapham  and  Brixton. 

Londoners  are  most  critical  on  the  music  question,  and  were 
things  as  bad  as  your  correspondent  would  have  us  believe  I  should 
be  one  of  the  first  to  notice  it. 

May  I  add  that  I  consider  TheCinema  is  a  most  interesting 
and  instructive  paper.  Yours  faithfully, 

Retford  House,  Suzanne  Bassett. 

Clapham  Common,  S.W. 

To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  'THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOYE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role. 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


12,   Coverdale-road,   W. 


There  is  no  danger  of  the  actor  becoming  obsolete  :  only  of  the 
plays  he  plays  in.  The  actor  is  not  being  superseded  by  the 
cinematograph,  which,  after  all,  has  the  actor  behind  it.  Of 
course,  the  cinema  theatre  will  affect  the  actor  and  the  drama.  If 
an  imaginative  artist  came  along,  he  could  make  something 
marvellous  out  of  the  cinematograph. — Mr.  I.  Zangwill. 

Mr.  Hugh  B.  C.  Pollard,  the  assistant  editor  of  The  Cinema  has 
just  finished  a  book  of  travel  in  Mexico  and  Central  America. 
Arrangements  are  being  made  for  its  appearance  during  the 
coming  publishing  season.  Mr.  Pollard,  it  is  interesting  to  note, 
is  the  nephew  of  Sir  William  Robertson  Nicoll,  the  famous 
journalist  and  litterateur,  of  British  Weekly   fame. 

Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swing,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "  WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  I. 


F.  FARRELL  &  Co.,  Ltd., 


CINEMATOGRAPH  THEATRE  BUILDERS. 


STRUCTURAL  ALTERATIONS   AND  REDECORATION 

SCHEMES    CARRIED    OUT    WITHOUT    INTERFERING 

WITH    DAILY    PERFORMANCES. 


We  make  it  our  business  to  know  all  the 
new  regulations  issued  by  the  Authorities. 


Estimates  Free — 

Town,  Country,  or  Abroad. 


CORRESPONDENCE  EN  TOUTES  LANGUES. 


Telegraphic  Address: 
"  Farrellize,  London." 

'Phone : 
7018  P.O.  Hampstead. 


9,  Fleet  Road, 
Hampstead,  N.W. 


SPECIAL    TERMS    TO    RELIABLE    FIRMS. 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


A    CINEMA    CENSORSHIP    INEVITABLE. 


THERE  has  recently  been  much  discussion  in 
Trade  circles  as  to  the  possibility  of  the 
appointment  of  a  Board  of  Cinematograph 
Censors  and  the  point  is  one  that  is  worthy  of 
serious  contemplation. 
The  popular  idea  of  a  Censor  is  that  his  duty  is 
restricted  to  the  preservation  of  public  morals,  by  which 
the  average  man  merely  understands  that  the  Censor 
prevents  the  production  of  indecent  or  undesirable 
drama.  Actually  his  range  of  influence  extends  a  great 
deal  further,  and  in  the  matter  of  its  probable  applica- 
tion to  cinema  films  it  opens  up  a  wide  range  of  serious 
problems. 

The  Functions  of  a  Censor.  

■ 

The  most  important  of  these 
is,  what  is  good  and  what  is 
bad  for  the  public  morals. 
As  the  general  spread  of  the 
film  theatre  has  in  itself 
created  a  new  public,  so  at 
the  same  time  it  has  created 
new  and  important  sociological 
problems.  We  can  safely  say 
that  at  present  no  immoral 
films  have  appeared  upon  the 
market,  but  can  we  guarantee 
that  they  will  not  do  so,  and 
that  even  if  they  did,  that 
they  would  not  find  exhibitors  ? 
No ;  without  new  legislation 
this  is  at  present  beyond  our 
powers.  We  may  hope  that 
it  may  never  occur — but  we 
cannot  guarantee  that  it  will 
not.  Therefore  it  is  necessary 
that  we  should  safeguard  our- 
selves against  it  without  further 
delay. 

Besides  the  question  of 
suggestive     films     we     have  a 

wide  range  of  films  that  although  in  themselves  not 
objectionable  to  a  large  number  of  patrons,  are  neverthe- 
less prone  to  exert  undesirable  influences  upon  cine- 
matograph audiences  whose  standard  of  'intellect  and 
education  is  low.  It  is  an  undeniable  fact  that  the 
sensational  effect  of  melodrama  appeals  more  strongly  to 
the  majority  of  the  audience  than  does  the  highly  moral 
denouement  with  virtue  triumphant  and  the  villain  slain. 

Mixed  Morals. 

In  many  films  the  morals  are  a  good  deal  mixed,  and 
it  is  really  not  very  clear  how  enormously  undesirable 
the  villain  is.  The  melancholy  result  of  this  is  that  the 
juvenile  brain  gets  a  thorough  soaking  in  suggested  crime, 
burglary,  forgery,  murder  and  suicide,  and  is  successful 
in  remembering  this  alone  and  not  the  real  moral  of  the 
story. 

We    have  cases   where   youths  have   pleaded    in  the 


"  The  Cinema "  earns  from  an  Official 
— and  therefore  absolutely  reliable — source 
that  the  appointment  of  a  Film  Censor 
is  already  being  seriously  discussed  by 
the  Authorities.  It  is  only  a  matter 
of  months  before  the  film  industry  will 
be  placed  under  official  regulation.  Under 
these  circumstances  manufacturers  should 
lose  no  time  in  formulating  their  own 
scheme  for  controlling  the  business, 
which  should  be  laid  before  the  Home 
Secretary  without  delay,  otherwise  they 
may  find  themselves  hampered  by  a 
number  of  irritating  conditions  which 
could    easily  have  been  avoided     . 


police  courts  that  they  were  turned  into  crime  by  cine- 
matograph shows.  Such  incidents  are  natural.  They 
do  not  condemn  the  picture  theatre.  They  merely  point 
the  need  for  greater  care  in  film  selection.  It  is  possible 
to  enquire  "  What  end  is  served  by  suppressing  the 
undesirable,  for  only  undesirables  approve  of  it  ?  Us  it 
does  not  affect."  But  we  must  as  citizens  face  the  point 
of  view  of  the  effect  of  these  films  on  the  rising  gene- 
ration, and  surely  we  can  afford  to  make  slight  sacrifices 
for  such  an  important  end. 

Undigested  Cinema  Drama. 

Another  point  that  calls  for  comment  is  the  dangerous 
tendency  of  undigested  cine- 
matograph drama  to  create 
dissatisfaction  with  social 
conditions.  We  have  story 
after  story  of  the  life  of 
the  rich — palaces,  automobiles, 
aeroplanes,  all-round  luxury — 
but  few  showing  the  toil 
and  solid  work  by  which 
this  desirable  condition  was 
obtained.  A  weak  individual 
suffering  possibly  from  an 
overdose  of  other  people's 
philosophy  is  likely  to  take 
the  line  of  least  resistance, 
which  inevitably  ends  in 
jail. 

Further  than  this,  even 
our  English  language  is  in 
peril.  Many  film  headings 
are  devoid  of  grammar,  and 
in  many  of  them  colloquial 
Americanisms  of  the  worst 
type  occur.  "  Henry  fixes 
the  automobeel "  is  typical. 
This  is  possibly  an  unimpor- 
tant matter,  but  such  idioms 
do  not  look  well  in  an  English 
business  letter,  and  the  employer  is  likely  to  resent 
their  use. 

While  these  are  all  points  to  which  attention  may  be 
drawn,  they  are  capable  of  improvement  by  the  indi- 
vidual manufacturers.  But  in  these  days  of  stress  and 
competition  it  would  surely  raise  the  standard'of  the  whole 
business  if  such  matters  were  taken  out  of  the  hands  of 
the  Trade  and  became  subject  to  the  Lord  Chamberlain. 
Our  English  officials  are  honest,  painstaking  individuals, 
above  outside  considerations,  and  can  be  trusted  to  do 
their  duty,  both  by  the  manufacturers  and  by  the  nation. 

Such  a  step  at  once  simplifies  and  elevates  the  Trade, 
and  it  is  essential  that  the  appeal  for  such  a  Board  should 
come  from  the  Trade  rather  than  from  the  Public,  for  it 
shows  at  once  that  we  do  not  fear  a  Censor  and  that  we 
ourselves  can  see  the   national    necessity  of  such  a  step. 

Hugh  B.  C.  Pollard. 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


0 

0 

0 

o  o 
o 


is' 


M  V 


8 


HERE'S  WHAT  YOU  WANT 


To  give  your  show  that   little  extra  bit  of  "life"  and  "drawing 
power"     that     is    so    important    and    is     yet    so    often    missing; 

THE  VIVAPHONE 

The    only    Singing     Pictures    that    have    perfect 
synchronisation    and    give    complete    satisfaction. 

Price  £5  5s.,  fitted  to  any  make  of   Projector. 

NEW  SUBJECTS  ARE  ADDED    EVERY   WEEK. 

Write    to-day    for    Lists    and    full    particulars. 


o 
o 

I 


I  \\\ 

o 

o 

M  / 


Ah 

o 
o 
M  / 


o 
o 


Ah 

o 

o 


Variety  turns   are    not  a  success 

in    a    Picture    Theatre,    and    yet 

some  break  in  your   Programme 

is    required 


Then,  without  doubt,  the  Viva- 
phone  is  what  you  require. 
If  YOU  don't  instal  it  be  sure 
.    the   opposition    show   WILL   . 


So    hustle   along    and    let    us    hear    from    you    at   once.      Competition    is   so 
keen    nowadays    that    you    cannot    afford    to    give    the    other    fellow    a   start. 

ALL    PRINTS    ON    EASTMAN    KODAK    STOCK    ONLY. 


Ah 

o 
o 

8 

8 

o 

o 

M  / 


V)    The  Hepworth  Manufacturing  Co.,   If 

3  Cinematographers,  Ltd 

o 

i 


2,  DENMAN    STREET,   PICCADILLY    CIRCUS,  LONDON,  W. 


o 
VIM 


Telegrams — "  Heptoic,  London. '; 


Telephone — Gerrard  2451. 


10 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


ELECTRICAL     VALUES     COLLOQUIALLY 

EXPLAINED. 


BY    M.    MANSELL. 


MONG  the  many  books  written  for  the  use  of 
operators,  and  called  "  Hints,"  there  does  not  seem 
to  be  one  which  really  explains  in  a  simple  and 
comprehensive  manner  the  actual  meaning  of 
terms  which   are  always  being   used. 

This  article  is  intended  to  clearly  explain  these 
terms  by  comparing  them  with  ordinary  mechanical  and 
physical  processes.  Electricity  to  the  showman  or  operator  is 
as  essential  as  a  forge  to  a  blacksmith,  yet  it  is  surprising  how 
few  understand  the  relationship  of  volt  to  ampere.  One  with- 
out the  other  expresses  no  actual  energy  at  all,  but,  in  the  case 
of  amperes,  the  amount  flowing  in  a  circuit,  and  in  the  case 
of  volts  a  difference  of  pressure  between  two  given  points,  or 
more  simply  the  rate  at  which  the  current  is  flowing. 

If  I  wanted  to  move  a  weight  of  28  lbs.,  I  should  use  less 
power  than  was  necessary  to  move  56  lbs.,  tout  that  does  not 
alter  the  fact  that  in  each  case  I  should  do  the  necessary 
mechanical  work  with  my  hand,  the  difference  being  that  for 
the  heavier  weight  I  should  exert  greater  pressure.  Now,  let 
us  compare  this  with  electricity.  Suppose  the  weight  of  28  lbs. 
is  standing  on  a  table,  and  I  push  it  with  a  pressure  of  15  lbs. 
with  one  hand.  The  weight  will  not  move.  If,  however,  I 
increase  the  pressure  to  30  lbs.,  the  weight  will  move,  so  that 
one  hand  at  30  lbs.  .pressure  will  move  a  weight  of  28  lbs.  Now, 
if  I  keep  one  hand  pressing  at  15  lbs.  pressure,  and  then  put 
on  the  other  hand  at  a  similar  pressure,  the  weight  will  again 
move.  Therefore,  one  hand  at  30  lbs.  pressure  is  equal  energy 
to  two  hands  at  15  lbs.  pressure.  We  cannot  gauge  the  amount 
of  work  a  factorv  with  100  hand  turns  out  unless  we  know 
the  speed  or  pressure  at  which  the  factory  works,  neither  can 
we  gauge  the  amount  of  work  by  being  told  the  pressure  with- 
out knowing  the  number  of  hands. 

Amperes  and  Volts. 

In  electricity  the  number  of  hands  might  toe  called  the  amperes 
and  the  pressure  the  volts.  If  one  says  that  four  ampere., 
are  flowing  in  a  circuit,  it  means  no  more  than  would  be  meant, 
to  take  another  parallel,  by  saying  that  water  was  (running 
through  an  inch  pipe.  It  is  obvious  that,  with  a  variation  of 
pressure,  the  water  would  run  through  slower  or  faster,  but 
the  quantity  in  the  pipe  would  never  alter.  It  would  always  be 
an  inch. 

The  Actual  Value  in  Watts. 

If  one  refers  to  an  inch  of  water  at  100  lbs.  pressure,  a  real 
measurement  can  be  made,  and  the  quantity  of  water  passing 
per  hour  can  be  exactly  calculated.  It  follows  that  the  pressure 
behind  the  water  must  be  proportionate  to  the  amount  running 
through  the  pipe.  With  electricity,  amperes  can  be  the  size 
of  the  pipe,  and  voltage  the  pressure.  The  two  multiplied  one 
by  the  other  give  the  actual  value  in  watts.  For  instance,  two 
amperes  at  500  volts  is  exactly  the  same  amount  of  energy  as 
500  amperes  at  two  volts.  In  each  case  the  two  multiplied  to- 
gether make  1,000  watts,  or  one  kilowatt.  A  kilowatt  flowing 
for  one  hour  is  the  Board  of  Trade  unit.  This  is  the  unit  by 
which  electricity  is  measured  and  sold  all  over  the  world. 

To  Obtain  Satisfactory  Results. 

It  has  been  found  in  cinematograph  work  that  the  most  satis- 
factory pressure  at  which  to  work  the  arc  is  in  the  neighbour- 
hood of  50  volts.  An  arc  at  lower  voltage  is  too  short,  and  re- 
quires  constant    feeding,   and   an   arc    at   higher   voltage   is   too 

Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swing-,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  Z. 


long,  and  liable  to  spit,  and  so  cause  an  unsteady  light.  Further- 
more, it  is  found  that  at  50  volts  the  arc  is  more  concentrated, 
and  most  nearly  approaching  to  the  desired  spot  of  light  desir- 
able for  all  projection  purposes.  A  manager  will  frequently 
complain  of  the  quality  of  light,  and  the  operator  will  point  to 
his  ammeter,  to  show  he  is  using,  say,  50  amperes  ;  but  it  does 
not  by  any  means  follow  that  toecause  50  amperes  is  being  used 
that  the  operator  is  not  at  fault.  He  could  use  50  amperes,  and 
get  next  to  no  light  at  all.  It  must  toe  50  amperes  at  50  volts 
to  obtain  satisfactory  results. 

How  the  Operator  is  Led  Astray. 

The  operator  is  generally  led  astray  by  the  faulty  resistance, 
and  this  applies  most  to  where  motor  generators  are  supplying 
current  at  60-70  volts  ;  a  slight  error  will  make  a  very  big 
difference  to  the  arc.  It  is  most  important  on  low  voltage 
circuits  to  have  the  resistance  made  for  the  exact  working 
voltage,  and  the  following  table  gives  some  idea  of  the 
tremendous  errors  a  resistance  designed   for  65  volts  will  give. 


Voltage  of  Circuit. 


1st  stop 
2nd  stop 
3rd  stop 
4th  stop 
5th  stop 


amperes 


55- 
6-6 

60. 

65- 

70. 

132 

20 

266 

10 

20 

30 

40 

!3'3 

266 

40 

533 

166 

33'2 

50 

66-6 

20 

40 

60 

80 

80. 

40 
60 
80 

100 

120 


It  does  not  need  more  than  a  glance  at  this  table  to  realise 
how  important  it  is  that  the  resistance  should  be  carefully 
wound,  as  unless  the  arc  is  worked  at  the  currents  stated,  it  is 
not  being  worked  correctly.  Now,  this  is  what  happens  in  actual 
practice.  The  motor  generator  is  ordered  for  65  volts,  and  on 
test  gives  68  volts.  The  showman  orders  a  65  volt  resistance, 
and  is  supplied  with  a  60  volt  one. 

Between  the  Devil  and  the  Deep  Sea. 

When  the  operator  strikes,  he  finds  that  to  get  a  steady  arc  he 
has  to  use  nearly  twice  the  current  the  resistance  is  supposed  to 
carry.  The  resistance  is  supposed  to  strike  at  20  amperes,  but 
does  so  at  35.  This  is  not  sufficient,  so  he  goes  on  to  the  next 
stop,  when  he  should  get  30  amperes,  tout  actually  gets  over  50. 
He  now  has  a  fine  light,  but  the  resistance  is  getting  red  hot, 
and  shows  signs  of  breaking  down.  What  can  the  operator  do? 
He  generally  opens  his  arc  -more,  and  it  splutters,  and  gives  a 
poor  light.  Actually  he  is  between  the  devil  and  the  deep  sea. 
He  has  to  risk  burning  up  his  resistance,  or  .put  up  with  a  poor 
and  unsatisfactory  light.  He  generally  chooses  the  latter  as  the 
lesser  evil.  This  is  the  .position  when  the  manager  comes  up 
and  complains.  It  is  in  cases  like  this  that  amperes  mean  very 
little.  Unfortunately,  the  operator  seldom  knows  what  is  really 
wrong,  and  puts  it  down  to  the  carbons  or  some  other  cause.  It 
may  seem  that  I  have  strayed  away  from  the  actual  purpose  of 
this  article,  but  I  have  done  so  in  order  to  show  that  an  ex- 
pression of  amperes  without  volts  has  little  meaning,  and  that 
it  is  as  important  to  get  the  one  correct  as  the  other. 

Amperes  regulate  the  quantity  of  light,  but  volts  control  the 
steadiness  and  quality.  An  arc  should  vary  very  little  in 
length  with  increase  of  current.  It  should  get  intenser,  not 
longer. 


To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  •'  THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOVE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role. 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


April,  1912.  THE     CINEMA.  11 


RUFFELLS 

Imperial    Bioscope    Syndicate,    Limited. 

NOTICE  OF  REMOVAL. 


WE    HAVE    REMOVED     TO 


166  &  168,  Shaftesbury  Avenue,  W.C 

(Two  minutes  from  the  Palace  Theatre,  towards  Holborri). 


Our  Customers  may  rely  on  the  same  prompt  attention  by  which 
our  business  has   been   built   up   during   the   last   twelve   years. 

With  larger  premises,  specially  fitted  for  carrying  on  trade  as  Film 
Hirers,  Kinematograph  Machine  Makers,  and  Dealers  in  all  the  Require- 
ments of  the  Picture  Showman,  we  shall  be  able  to  fully  cope  with  the 
increasing   business   which   has   necessitated   our   removal. 


NOTE    our    Telephone    Numbers : 

Gerrard   7230   and  6695. 

and    Telegraphic    Jlddress : 

"  Ruffoscope,   London. ' ' 

ALL    ENQUIRIES    PROMPTLY    ANSWERED. 

fa]  \^L 


12 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,   1912. 


E^it  ^  the  keen  fight   for   the  survival  of  the   £^5 

fittest    he    is    well    armed    who    programs 
6S  Yj*™™*m  regularly.  ^ 


POSITIVE  PROOF 

Released  Sunday,   April   28th. 
(Approximate  Length,  999  ft.) 

A  powerful  gripping  Drama 
illustrating  the  danger  of  accu- 
sation on  circumstantial  evi- 
dence. A  picture  to  make  one 
think.  The  third  of  the  series 
of     Detective      Dramas     which 

have  created  such  a 
PHENOMENAL    SENSATION. 


SUPERB 
QUALITY. 


HIGHEST 
TALENT. 


CONSISTENT 
RELIABILITY. 


OUT  OF  THE 
DEPTHS. 

Released  Sunday,  May  12th. 
{Approximate  Length  996  ft.) 

A  feature  dramatic  produc- 
tion de  luxe.  See  how  Nature 
metes?  out  punishment  to  the 
guilty  and  justice  to  the 
wronged  with  one  of  her 
most  powerful  and  irresistible 
weapons, 

I  LIGHTNING 


MASTERFUL 
PRODUCTION. 


CUPID'S  LEAP  YEAR 
PRANKS. 

Released  Sunday,  May  12th. 
.Approximate  Length  994  ft.) 

A  Comedy  of  Comedies,  and 
one  of  the  finest  produced  by 
our  Eastern  players.  The  various 
scenes  will  keep  your  patrons 
in  one  long  laugh,  and  that  is 
what  you  want.  See  it  and  you 
will  not  miss  booking. 


ALL    ESSANAY    PHOTOPLAYS    PRINTED    EXCLUSIVELY    ON    EASTMAN    STOCK. 


Telephone: 

2129   CITY. 

e'.2    grams: 

'  ESSAFILM." 


ESSANAY    FILM    M'FG.    CO. 

(H.  A.   SPOOR,   Sole  Distributor). 

5,    WARDOUR    STREET,    LONDON,    W. 


Cablegrams: 
"ESSANAY, 

LONDON.' 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


13 


(From    Our  Own  Correspondent.) 


NEW  YORK,  March  2ist. 

HE  advent  of  the  "  toplcals  "  of  the  Chinese 
Revolution  is  eagerly  awaited.  It  appears 
that  a  Chinese  and  Japanese  cinematograph 
firm  have  seoured  many  splendid  and  exclu- 
sive films  of  the  street  fighting  in  Pekin  and 

the  railway  wrecking  tactics  at  Hao-tse.     "  There  will 

be  a  hot  time  in  China-town  to-night. ' ' 

For  a  free  Republic,  the  reception  accorded  to  your 
Mr.  Ohas.  Urban 's  Kinemaoolor  films  of  the  Durbar 
has  been  astonishing.  All  the  most  earnest  daughters 
of  the  Revolution  are  rushing  to  see  the  feudal 
Monarchy  and  the  down-trodden  myriads  of  Indian 
slaves.  We  may  be  Republican,  but  a  "  King  and 
Queen  in  Kinemacoloir  "  is  not  to>  be  resisted.  Besides 
just  think  of  the  dresses  ! 

<«- 

As  I  forecast  a  month  or  two  back,  the  United  States 
War  Department  have  made  arrangements  to  use  the 
cinema  as  an  aid  to  recruiting.  They  have  contracted 
with  the  New  York  Film  Company  to  take  films  of  all 
branches  of  the  war  establishment  and  the  West  Point 
Cadets  (the  American  Sandhurst).  The  navy,  too,  is  not 
to  be  neglected,  and  Admiral  Schuster  is  arranging  for 
similar  features  to  be  filmed  for  them. 

The  Imp  Company  have  been  down  to  Monterey, 
in  Old  Mexico*,  in  order  to  take  Carnival  scenes. 
Coming  back  they  got  several  special  films  of  genuine 
revolutionary  fighting,  as  well  as  several  of  the  Ameri- 
can frontier  camps  who  are  watching  over  American 
interests  south   of  the  Rio  Grande. 

<*- 

Pathe  Fr feres  have  been  doing  some  sensational  stuff, 
and  have  engaged  the  services  of  a  professional  high 
jumper,  who  has  been  earning  a  good  salary  for  doing 
such  cheery  feats  as  jumping  off  the  Statue  of  Liberty 
and  Brooklyn  Bridge.  I  hope  that  they  will  make  good 
use  of  him — while  he  lasts  ! 

A  recent  development  of  the  cinematograph  is  of 
interest  in  military  circles.  A  series  of  experiments  have 
been  carried  out  at  Fort  Worth,  Texas,  proving  that 
by  the  use  of  a  cinecamera  mounted  on  a  pivot-bearing 
complete  circular  photo  maps  giving  accurate  range 
distances  oan  be  made  from  a  view-point  in  a  captive 
war  balloon. 


The  Rev.  Father,  Joseph  Tonello  has  taken  with  him 
to  the  Vatican  a  series  of  prints  showing  the  life  of 
Columbus  taken  from  the  Selig  Company's  film  "  Chris- 
topher Columbus."  Special  arrangements  are  being 
made  to  exhibit  before  the  Pope  a  complete  film  at  a 
private  audience. 

<«- 

The  Vitagraph    Company  have  been  specially   com 
missioned  by  the   Canadian  Government  to  take  films  of 
Canadian  historical  interest.      The  first  will   show   the 
meeting  of  the  Parliamentary  Council  at  Ottawa. 


Mr.  John  Cort,  the  well-known  theatrical  impresario, 
is  on  a  visit  to  New  York.  He  allows  that  a  talking 
picture  machine  in  which  he  is  interested  will  entirely 
revolutionise  the  theatre  business  and  put  his  rivals  out 
of  the  running. 

<•- 

The  use  of  cinematograph  film  for  electioneering 
purposes  is  gradually  spreading  in  the  States.  Strong 
use  is  being  made  of  this  method  of  political  publicity 
during  the  present  election  in  Illinois.  A  start  having 
been  made,  it  will  presumably  not  be  long  before  the 
reform  parties  turn  their  attention  to  the  new  weapon 
and  the  plain  citizen  will  have  his  feelings  harrowed  by  a 
continuous  free  cinematograph 
display  of  various  things  that 
need  reforming,  and  for  which 
he   will    have   to    pay. 


THE   B.    AND    C.    No.  1    STOCK   COMPANY. 

Elsewhere  we  print  the  portraits  of  leading  members  of  the 
B.  and  C.  No.  1  Stock  Company.  Lieut.  Daring,  R.N.,  the 
hero  of  the  cliff  accident  at  the  beginning  of  last  month,  has  a 
name  to  juggle  with,  and  one  that  at  the  present  moment  is 
being  eulogised  throughout  the  length  and  breadth  of  the 
British  Isles.  Miss  Ivy  Martinek  is  a  thoroughly  versatile 
woman,  and  can  ride,  swim,  cycle  drive,  fence,  and  shoot.  Entirely 
without  fear,  she  has  worked  her  way  into  the  hearts  of 
thousands  of  picture  theatre  patrons.  Mr.  John  O'Neil  Farrell, 
the  enterprising  chief  of  the  publicity  department  of  the 
British  and  Colonial  Kinematograph  Co.,  Ltd.,  is  a  Canadian 
by  birth,  and  has  been  connected"  with  the  moving  picture 
trade  for  the  past  twelve  years,  both  in  England  and  across  the 
herring  pond.  Miss  Dorothy  Foster  is  a  charming  leading 
lady,  and  has  been  connected  with  the  firm  fo-  "-bout  four 
vears.   and   has  played  in  all  their  big  successes. 


14 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,    1912. 


FROM    CHAPEL    TO    CINEMA 


Many  buildings  at  one  time  used  as  places  of  worship  have  been 
transformed  into  picture  theatres  in  different  parts  of  London. 
The  conversion  of  one  of  these  into  a  picture  theatre  is  the  subject 
of  an  appeal  in  the  House  of  Lords.  The  building  referred  to  is 
the  Adelphi  Chapel,  Hackney  Road,  which,  for  some  years  prior 
to  April,  1910,  had  ceased  to  be  used  as  a  place  of  worship,  and 
had  become  derelict.  The  Charity  Commissioners  gave  authority 
to  the  sole  surviving  trustee  to  sell  the  premises,  but  Mrs.  Mary 
Rose,  who  is  entitled  to  the  benefit  of  the  rent  reserved  by  the 
underlease,  now  seeks  to  restrain  the  purchasers  of  the  chapel  from 
carrying  out  the  proposed  alterations,  which,  it  is  contended,  will 
render  the  building  unfit  for  use  as  a  chapel  or  place  of  public 
worship 

ORDER  FOR   POSSESSION. 

At  Bow  County  Court  recently,  Mr.  J.  Harrison  asked  his 
Honour  Deputy  Judge  Brooks  for  an  order  entitling  him  to 
take  possession  of  the  Mission  Hall,  Cann  Hall  Road,  in  possession 
of  the  Palace  Electric  Theatres,  Ltd.,  Queen  Victoria  Street. 
Defendants  did  not  appear.  The  premises  were  let  under  an 
agreement  which  stipulated  that  if  the  rent  were  not  paid  seven  days 
after  the  date  specified  plaintiff  had  the  right  of  entry  without 
taking  legal  proceedings.  On  November  12  last  plaintiff  obtained 
judgment  against  the  defendants  for  £\i  10s.  rent,  with  costs,  but 
was  unable  to  obtain  the  payment.  There  was  nothing  now  in  the 
premises  except  benches  and  chairs  which  belonged  to  plaintiff. — 
Plaintiff  gave  evidence,  and  said  that  on  January  12  /17  10s.  was 
due  for  eight  months'  rent. — His  Honour  made  an  order  for 
possession  in  four  weeks'  time,  and  judgment  for  the  rent  with 
costs  and  counsel's  fee. 


An  operator  who  pleaded  guilty  to  using  imflammab'e 
films  at  an  unlicensed  hall  was  fined  £5,  at  the  Dunbar- 
ton  Sheriff's  Court.  Defendant  said  he  understood  the 
permission  of  the  police  had  been  asked. 

Mr.  Arthur  Campbell  of  the  Picturedrome,  Cheetham, 
has  been  fined  10s.  and  costs  on  one  summons,  and 
ordered  to  pay  the  costs  of  four  others,  for  allowing  the 
gangways  in  his  hall  to  be  obstructed. 

A  fine  of  £\o  and  costs  was  imposed  upon  the 
proprietor  of  the  Prince's  Picture  Palace  for  allowing  a 
number  of  persons  to  stand  in  a  passage  while  the 
pictures  were  in  progress.  Defendant  pleaded  that  the 
overcrowding  only  continued  whilst  the  picture  was 
being  shown  and  that  as  soon  as  it  was  finished  the  people 
were  shown  to  their  seats.  The  police  evidence  how- 
ever was  to  the  effect  that  at  the  time  of  the  alleged 
overcrowding  the  sitting  accommodation  was  fully 
occupied. 

On  the  ground  that  there  was  no  necessity  for  an 
increase  of  places  of  entertainment  in  the  borough,  the 
Accrington  magistrates  have  refused  cinematograph 
licenses  for  the  local  skating-rink  and  a  new  building 
which  it  was  proposed  to  erect.  The  refusal  to  grant 
these  licences  was  rhe  outcome  of  opposition  by  the 
owners  of  several  amusement  houses  in  the  town. 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience 


HEREVER  I  go  I  hear  reports  of  good  business 
being  done.  Proposals  are  still  being  made  for  the 
erection  of  new  cinema  theatres,  and  both  small 
and  large  houses  are  doing  bigger  business  every 
day,  and  larger  halls  are  still  being  erected.  Of 
course  I  am  only  speaking  of  theatres  which  are 
well    managed   and   properly   conducted. 

Take,  for  instance,  the  neighbourhood  of  Edgware-road. 
There  are  already  four  or  five  theatres  close  to  one  another, 
l'yke's  Circuit  is  in  the  main  road  ;  the  Praed-street  Electric 
Theatre  two  or  three  doors  from  the  main  road  ;  Grand  Cinema 
at  No.  280 ;  and  the  Imperial  Theatre  at  No.  382,  Edgware- 
road.  Here  are  four  houses  all  with  a  good  seating  capacity 
and  all  doing  large  business.  Yet  Mr.  Israel  Davis  is  about  to 
commence  building  a  larger  one  than  any  of  those  mentioned. 
It  will  have  a  seating  capacity  of  over  1,000,  in  one  of  the  best 
positions,  viz.,  at  Nos.  282-284,  Edgware-road.  and  a  large 
frontage  in  addition  on  the  Marylebone-road.  Mr.  Davis  is 
going  to  erect  this  theatre  in  his  usual  high-class  style,  and 
by  the  time  it  is  finished,  he  informs  me  it  will  be  one  of  the 
handsomest   in  London. 

Mr.  Davis  is  also  building  a  theatre  in  Shaftesbury-avenue. 
This  also  will  be  a  very  handsome  building,  although  there  are 
already  three  or  four  quite  close  by,  viz.,  Pyke's  Circuit  in 
the  Charing  Cross-road,  Pyke's  Circuit  and  Mr.  Schlentheim's 
house  in  Great  Windmill-street.  In  addition,  there  is  a  bunch 
of  them  at  Tottenham  Court-road  and  the  corner  of  Oxford- 
street.  There  are  others  in  Leicester-square,  the  back  of  the 
Cavour,  and  the  new  one  which  is  being  built  in  Coventry-street. 

Look  again  at  Brixton,  where  there  are  already  one  of  Mr. 
Davis',  one  belonging  to  Mr.  Borradaile's  Co.,  the  one  that 
Pyke's  Co.  recently  took  over  from  Mrs.  Melnotte  YVyatt,  the 
other  one  belonging  to  Pyke's  Co.  at  Brixton  Hill,  and  in  addi- 
tion to  these  there  will  be  an  enormous  one  built,  in  which 
Messrs.  Sedger  and  Laurillard  are  interested,  next  to  the  Town 
Hall.  This  theatre,  I  understand,  will  be  capable  of  seating 
2,500,  and  will  be  really  the  very  latest  thing,  and  finished  in 
that  high-class  style  and  with  the  charming  taste  that  one 
always  associates  with  Mr.  Sedger's  theatres,  one  of  the  latest 
and  most  notable  of  his  being  the  King's  Picture  Play  House, 
King's-road,   Chelsea. 

These  new  theatres,  it  will  be  noticed,  are  all  being  put  up 
by  men  in  the  "know,"  men  who  know  all  that  is  worth  know- 
ing in  the  cinematograph  world,  and  are  far-seeing,  capable, 
and  energetic.  Surely  this  proves  that  the  cinema  .property 
market  is  in  as  upward  a  state  as  ever  it  was.  Applicants  for 
going    concerns    are  as    numerous    as    ever.     I   might    say   that 

hundreds  are  waiting  for  opportunities  to  step  into  concerns. 

A  peculiar  thing  is  that  some  of  them  do  not  mind  if  the 
theatre  is  doing  bad  business,  and  even  not  paying,  and  some 
really  say  they  do  not  mind  if  it  is  closed  altogether.  These 
men  know  their  own  capabilities,  and  are  aware  that  many 
theatres  have  lost  money  and  are  closed  solely  in  consequence 
of  management  that  has  not  been  up  to  the  mark  and  the 
business  not  having  been  fully  understood  by  those  in  re- 
sponsible charge.  I  could  mention  numerous  theatres  that  have 
been  in  this  state  and  have  changed  hands  and  reopened,  and 
instead  of  losses  being  made  week  by  week  the  takings  have 
immediately  increased  under  efficient  management,  and  they 
are  doing  a  large  and  remunerative  business,  and  are.  now 
flourishing  and  successful  establishments. 


THE    GREAT    MOMENT   has   come    for    you  to    book    that 
sensational  film,  "GIPSY  BLOOD,"  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No. 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


15 


"  C.  &  G." 

CINEMA     AND     GENERAL     SUPPLY     CO., 

49,  Whyteville  Road,  Forest  Gate,  London,  E. 

Telegrams— "  CINESUPPLY,  LONDON."        Telephone:   GERHARD  3217. 

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had  during  six  vears'  experience." 

7IG0MAR    v.    NICK     CARTER,    released    March    24,    3,600    ft.      Free   May    6, 

m"  IN     THE     GRIP     OF    ALCOHOL,     2,600     ft.        LADY     MARY'S     LOVE, 

2,300  ft.  Three  days  15s.,  week  30-.  each.  PATHE  GAZETTES, 
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Specimens  free. 

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Foe  to  Richelieu,  Louisa  Miller,  Queen  of  Criminals.  Railroad  Raiders, 
Gambling  Mania,  Captain  Kate,  Reign  of  Terror,  and  all  the  best 
comedies,  comics,  etc. 

I— I  IRE  CHEAP. -TOP-LINE  DRAMAS.  ALSO  COMPLETE  PROGRAMS.  5,000 
feet  i  two  changes1  £4,  including  at  least  one  of  List  B:— In  Grip  Alcohol, 
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16 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,   1912. 


A  Quartette    that 
will  pack  your  halls 


BIG  CHUMP 
LITTLE  CHUMP 


THURSDAY,   APRIL  11th. 

John  Bunny. 
Marshal  P.  Wilder. 


Bunny  at  his  BEST. 


A  Screamer. 


Lite  SATURDAY,  APRIL  20th. 

An    actual    production    of    Scenes    and    Incidents     which    transpired    500   ft.    below    the 
earth's  surface.       Timely  rescue  of   Imprisoned  Miners  from  a  Pennsylvania   Coal  Mine. 


THURSDAY,  APRIL  25th. 

An  Elopement  on    a    Hand    Car,  the     Lovers     being    united    on  a  Motor    Car,  going  at 

50  Miles  an  Hour. 


m  m 


THURSDAY,  MAY  2nd. 


Jean,  the  Vitagraph  Dog,  at  his  best.       Lovers    of   little    Children    and    Animals  should 

see  this  wonderful  production. 


THE 

VITAGRAPH  COMPANY 
OF  AMERICA, 

15  and   17,    CECIL   COURT, 

CHARING  CROSS  ROAD, 

LONDON,  W.C. 


Telegrams:     "  Vitgraf,    London." 
Telephone  :   14,277  Central. 


Supplement 


Tim 


APRIL,     1912. 


"THE  CINEMA"  critics  attend  the  leading  film  demonstrations,  and  all  films  reviewed  in  this 
Supplement  have  been  selected  from  the  various  programmes  of  releases  during 
the  ensuing  month. 

EXHIBITORS     CAN     RELY     UPON     "THE     CINEMA"     FILM     SELECTION     AS     BEING     THE     PICK 

OF    THE     MARKET. 


A.B. 

M.P.  Sales  Co.,  Wardour  Street. 


"  IOLA'S  PROMISE."— Released  April 28th.  Length  1,056  feet. 

A  very  pretty  Indian  film  full  of  thrills  and  taken  amidst  beauti- 
ful scenery.  Iola,  a  little  Indian  girl,  is  held  captive  by  a  gang  of 
cutthroats,  from  whose  clutches  and  abuse  she  is  rescued  by  Jack 
Harper,  a  prospector.  She  is  truly  grateful  to  Jack,  for  she 
regards  him  as  something  different  from  the  white  people  she  has 
seen.  She  helps  him  to  find  gold,  and  gives  her  life  to  protect 
Jack's  sweetheart  from  her  own  people,  who  are  embittered  against 
all  whites. 

"A  SIREN  OF  IMPULSE."— Released  April  14th,  Length 
998  feet.     Drama. 

A  beautifully  staged  Mexican  film  giving  a  vivid  impression 
of  commonplace  Mexican  life  and  fiery  Southern  passions. 
Mariana,  a  tantalising  coquette,  has  the  hearts  of  the 
young  men  agog,  until  Jose  finally  wins  her.  Shortly  after  her 
marriage,  Fiesta  Day  arrives,  and  though  she  desires  to  attend  the 
dance  in  the  evening,  Jose,  through  jealousy,  refuses.  Deciding  to 
respect  her  husband's  command,  she  lends  her  festival  dress  to 
her  friend  Gloria.  As  the  party  leaves,  a  child  enters  and  solicits 
Mariana's  aid  for  her  sick  mother.  Jose,  returning  to  the  house 
after  his  temper  has  cooled,  finds  his  wife  absent,  and  of  course 
assumes  she  has  gone  to  the  dance.  This  assumption  is  strengthened 
by  seeing  his  erstwhile  rival  in  the  distance  on  the  way  to  the 
Gardens  with  Gloria,  who,  in  his  wife's  attire,  he  reasonably  mis- 
takes for  Mariana.     A  tragedy  is  narrowly  averted  by  mere  chance. 


"A  STRING  OF  PEARLS."— Released  April  18th.  Length 
998  feet. 

A  beautiful  allegorical  film  peculiarly  suitable  for  the  Eastern 
market.  A  multi-millionaire  presents  his  wife  with  a  string  of 
pearls  worth  a  quarter  of  a  million  dollars.  In  so  doing  he  pam- 
pers the  vanity  of  his  spouse.  But  of  what  use  is  this  string  of 
material  pearls  when  sorrow  comes  ?  Will  it  save  her  from  the 
grave  ?  No.  On  the  other  hand  is  shown  the  spiritual  string  of 
pearls  in  the  form  of  charitable,  loving  souls,  following  the 
Christian  injunction  :  "  Love  thy  neighbour  as  thyself."  Among 
these  we  find  a  young  man,  who  is  in  the  employ  of  this  multi- 
millionaire, stricken  with  a  serious  illness,  and  doomed  to  die  if  not 
given  the  beneficial  influence  of  country  air.  This  requires  money, 
and  his  employer  turns  a  deaf  ear  on  his  sister's  appeal  for  help 
with  which  to  send  him  away.  The  real  pearls,  his  poor  neighbours, 
gather  together  of  their  Christmas  savings  sufficient  to  defray  the 
expenses  of  his  trip,  and  are  delighted  with  the  result  of  their  self- 
denial  when  he  returns  later  thoroughly  cured. 


AMBROSIO. 

New  Agency  Film  Co.,  Shaftesblrv  Av. 


"M'AMSELLE  NITOUCHE."— Released  April  28th.  Length 
2,910  feet. 

We  have  never  before  seen  a  better  film  comedy.  "M'amselle 
Nitouche"  overflows  with  real  humour  and  incident,  and  is 
absolutely  free  from  anything  in  the  least  risky.  It  is  acted 
throughout  by  thorough  artists.  The  action  is  instinct  with  life 
and  high  spirits,  and  the  plot  is  one  which  piles  laughable  situation 


The'Deci.i'Tion  "  (Hcpworth), 


Traitress  of  Parton's  Court"  (Hepworth). 


1U 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


A)  Kir 


[gi2. 


"An  Assisted  Elopement"    (American). 

upon  laughable  situation.  In  short,  this  film  appeals  forcibly  to 
the  modern  educated  public.  The  subject  is  the  laughable 
adventures  of  a  convent  girl,  Mdlle.  Nitouche,  and  her  music 
master.  The  latter  writes  an  opera,  and  owing  to  an  unforeseen 
incident,  the  little  convent  girl  has  to  take  the  prima  donna's  part. 
Together  master  and  pupil  go  through  endless  adventures,  and  the 
film  is  one  long  scream.  No  showman  should  miss  it  as  it  is  one 
of  the  best  things  we  have  seen  for  some  time. 


AMERICAN    CO., 

lot,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


-Released  April  24th. 


"THE  LEAP  YEAR  COMEDY."— Released  April  20th. 
Length  970  feet. 

An  exceptionally  amusing  and  topial  film.  A  widower  falls  in 
love  with  his  neighbour,  a  widow.  His  love-making  is  somewhat 
upset  by  his  children  and  by  the  widow's  son  and  daughter,  who 
consider  it  their  duty  to  keep  an  eye  on  their  parents.  Meanwhile 
the  young  people  become  interested  in  each  other,  and  a  most 
amusing  climax  is  reached  on  February  29th,  when  the  various 
couples  pair  off.  A  clever  little  film  worthy  a  place  in  any 
programme. 

"THE  LAND  BARON  OF  SAN  TEE. 
Length  990  feet. 

That  great  problem  of  the  West — the  water  problem — is  well 
illustrated  in  this  film.  A  cruel,  crafty  land  baron  finds  it  to  his 
interest  to  completely  stop  the  water  supply  of  an  entire  town. 
The  result  is  powerfully  depicted — the  su  ering  of  women  and 
children,  the  relentless  barbarity  of  a  selfish  old  man  who  meets 
his  retribution  in  a  singular  way.  A  wonderful  portrayal  of  a 
great  question,  masterfully  bandied.     An  excellent  film. 

"AN  ASSISTED  ELOPEMENT."— Released  April  27th. 
Length  995  feet. 

Good  Western  Comedy,  showing  how  a  young  mechanic,  in 
the  race  for  love,  makes  a  grandstand  play  and  wins  out  in  the 
ninth  innings.  A  home  run  with  the  girl  in  the  case — and  an 
attorney  rival  paying  the  marriage  fee  in  the  county  jail,  plus  a 
fine  for  speed  and  carting  away  the  happy  pair  in  his  automobile  ! 
A  most  amusing  story. 

"FROM  THE  FOUR-HUNDRED  TO  THE  HERD."— 
Released  May  4th.     Length  990  feet. 

Displeased  with  her  indecision,  Jack  Stevens,  a  man  of  moderate 
means,  asks  Clarice  Weybrook  to  accept  either  him  or  the  rich  Earl 
of  Derbly.  They  quarrelled  and  Clarice  married  the  Earl.  Two 
years  later  the  Earl,  bankrupt,  dies  and  Clarice  and  her  mother  go 
to  live  on  what  they  think  is  their  own  ranch,  but  which  has  really 
been  purchased  by  Jack.  Thus  an  odd  situation  is  brought  out 
and  finally  solved  to  everyone's  satisfaction.     This  film  contains 


1  — .^    szr 

- 

^1 

^H 

ggU^ 

\  *m"  j^h<<- 

^W^  T°V«1 

"For  the  Honour  of  the  Family''  (Vitagraph) 

some  splendid  views,  the  scene  shifting  from  the 
splendour  and  luxury  of  California's  greatest  hotels 
to  the  out-of-doors  life  of  the  ranch.  Showmen 
should  make  a  point  of  securing  this  film. 


AMERICAN  FILM. 

Cecil  Court,    W.C. 


"THE  RECKONING."— Released  April  6th.  Length  900 
feet  Drama.  A  splendid  film  of  the  Far  North,  of  thrilling 
interest  all  through. 

Frank  Sheilds  and  some  miners  are  working  a  mine.  Frank 
writes  asking  his  brother  to  come  North.  Bob  sets  out  and 
encounters  Bart  Murray,  a  bully.  A  fight  ensues,  and  he  is  killed. 
The  news  is  heartrending  to  Frank,  who  eventually  causes  Bart  to 
kill  himself  by  his  own  weapon.  He  is  wounded  himself,  but  under 
Kate's  care  finally  recovers  and  is  rewarded  by  winning  her  for  his 
wife. 


BISON. 


Cosmopolitan  Film  Co.,  Gerrard 
Street,  W. 


"WAR  ON  THE  PLAINS."— Released  April  21st.  Length 
2,190  feet. 

This  film  is  one  of  the  magnificent  101  Ranch  productions  that 
have  created  such  a  sensation  in  the  film  world.  It  is  really 
wonderful  to  see  the  accuracy  and  careful  work  that  the  Bison 
Company  have  put  ii  to  it.  Every  little  detail  is  historically 
correct  and  the  actual  fighting  magnificently  done.  One  gets  a 
stronger  idea  of  the  heroism  of  the  early  Pioneers  and  a 
more  vivid  appreciation  of  the  truth  of  the  early  American 
literature  chronicling  the  perils  of  the  Indians  than  one  has  ever 
had  before.  Altogether  a  big  film  that  no  one  can  afford  to  be 
without.  We  see  two  lost  prospectors  struggling  over  the  arid 
plains.  Their  stock  of  water  is  nearly  exhausted.  Wearied  and 
worn,  they  lie  down  to  rest,  and  while  one  sleeps,  the  other, 
Drake,  treacherously  steals  the  remainder  of  the  water  from  his 
companion's  waterbottle,  then  rides  off  leaving  his  f  iend  to  his 
fate.  Thefilm  is  full  of  strong  dramatic  situations,  is  not  without 
an  effective  love  interest,  and  the  battle  between  emigrants  and 
Indians  will  arouse  the  enthusiasm  of  the  audience.  Excellently 
done  all  through. 


B.  &  C. 

Bxdelx  Street,  W. 


"  HOW  MICKEY  DOOLEY  SURVIVED  THE  COAL 
STRIKE."— Released  April  7th.     Length  360  feet. 

The  B.  and  C.  Company  is  to  be  congratulated  upon  the 
enterprise  .which  resulted  in  the  production   of    this    film.     We 


April,  1912. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


lias  been  located  at  Twosone,  but  to  reach  it  they  must  pass  through 
"  Death's  Valley  "  which  is  nothing  more  or  less  than  a  death 
trap.  The  chums  decide  to  go,  despite  the  warnings  of  their 
comrades,  and  for  days  and  nights  they  travel  through  the  hot 
and  blinding  sand,  studded  with  skeletons,  until  their  strength 
gives  way  and  they  sink  down  exhausted.  Paul  manages  to  crawl 
to  a  waterhole,  and  filling  his  bottle  he  returns  to  his  chum,  when 
they  are  attacked  by  savage  Indians  and  only  rescued  in  the  nick 
of  time  by  a  troop  of  U.S.A.  cavalry  sent  in  search  of  them  by  the 
miners  of  the  Arizona  Camp.     A  strong  story,  full  of  thrills. 


CHAMPION. 

J.  F.  Brockliss,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


A  Rough   Diamond"  (Clarendon) . 


"  WHAT  THE  INDIANS  DID."— Released  May  1st.  Length 
998  feet. 

One  of  the  chief  features  of  this  film  is  a  most  realistic  fight 
between  Indians  and  campers.  A  strong  love  interest  also 
adds  to  its  value  from  the  showman's  point  of  view. 


understand  that  the  plot  was  handed  to  Mr.  Northcote  at  four 
o'clock  on  a  recent  afternoon,  that  it  was  produced  on  the  follow- 
ing dav,  and  was  in  the  hands  of  Messrs.  Markt  and  Co.  by  noon 
the  day  after.  Exhibitors  have  no  need  to  be  told  that  anything 
which  bears  upon  the  present  coal  strike  is  of  the  greatest 
interest  to  any  audience,  and  therefore  bound  to  prove  an  irresist- 
able  attraction.  The  story  does  not  deal  with  any  sociological 
aspect  of  the  struggle  between  Capital  and  Labour,  but  is  an 
amusing  illustration  of  the  old  adage,  "  It  is  an  ill  wind  that 
blows  nobody  any  good."  In  a  few  words  the  story  illustrates 
how  Mickey  Dooley.  owing  to  the  strike,  finds  himself  without  a 
job  and  subject  to  the  irritations  of  a  nagging  wife.  To  avoid 
her  attentions  he  mounts  the  garden  wall  to  read  his  paper,  and 
while  sitting  there  a  bill-poster  comes  along  and  sticks  up  a 
placard  which  reads,  "  When  you  strike,  hit  hard:"  This  catches 
the  eye  of  a  number  of  bargees  who  are  unloading  emergency 
coal  for  the  neighbouring  gasworks.  They  pelt  Mickey  with  coal, 
who  beats  a  hasty  retreat.  He  has  an  idea.  In  his  place  he  puts 
a  dummy,  and  the  bargees,  thinking  the  man  himself  is  still  sitting 
there,  continue  to  pelt  it  with  coal  until  his  back-yard  is  full  of 
this  valuable  commodity.  Mickey  goes  into  business  as  a  coal  mer- 
chant and  makes  his  fortune.     A  very  laughable  and  amusing  film. 

"  LIEUT.  DARING,  R.N.,  AND 
THE  SHIP'S  MASCOT."  Re- 
leased April  28th. 

"Jumbo,"  a  black  boy,  having 
been  rescued  from  slavery  during  a 
cruise  of  "H.M.S.  Britannic"  in 
the  West  Indies,  becomes  greatly 
attached  to  Lieut.  Daring,  and 
during  a  stay  in  Riga  they  go  ashore 
together.  Brigands  pounce  on  the 
Lieutenant  and  try  to  rob  him. 
During  the  struggle  Daring  falls 
over  the  cliffs,  but  saves  his  life  by 
clutching  a  tree.  Rescued  from 
almost  certain  death,  equally  thrill- 
ing adventures  await  him.  Recap- 
tured by  the  brigands,  the  Lieutenant 
is  hung  up  by  his  heels,  but  "Jumbo" 
arrives  in  the  nick  of  time  with  the 
boat's  crew,  who  make  short  work 
of  the  brigands.     A  real  top-liner. 

"THROUGH  DEATH'S 
VALLEY."— Released  April  14th. 
Length  1,185  feet. 

Fred  Paul  and  Wallett  Waller, 
successful  New  York  brokers,  lose 
all  in  one  disastrous  speculation 
Reading  in  a  paper  of  the  finding  of 
gold  in  Arizona,  they  decide  to  try 
their  luck.  Nothing  but  disappoint- 
ment, however,  meet  their  efforts, 
and  at  last  news  is  brought  in  by  a 
dying  miner  that  a  rich  find  of  gold 


CLARENDON, 

12,    Charing    Cross    Road,    W.C. 


"THE  ROUGH  DIAMOND."— Released  April  14th.  Length 
945  feet. 

Once  again  the  Clarendon  Company  has  succeeded  in  turning 
out  a  story  full  of  interest,  almost  worthy  of  ranking  with  that 
excellent  story  ' '  At  the  Hour  of  Three, ' '  reviewed  in  our  last  issue. 
Here  we  have  the  reformation  of  a  savage  and  vicious  London  out- 
cast who  enlists  in  the  army.  In  barracks  he  becomes  a  bully  and 
is  for  ever  in  disgrace  and  the  despair  of  his  superior  officers. 
The  opportunity  to  prove  his  worth,  however,  comes  when  his 
regiment  is  ordered  out  on  foreign  service.  The  film  shows  in  the 
most  effective  and  stirring  manner  how  Jim  learns  the  value  of 
self-esteem  and  incidentally  proves  his  courage  by  protecting  the 
Colonel's  child  during  an  attack  on  his  house  by  the  enemy.  Jim 
rescues  the  child  and  prepares  to  make  the  last  stand.  An 
exciting  situation  is  thus  created  and  for  some  minutes  there  is  a 


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The  Lion's  Revenge"  (Gmtmont). 


IV. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


Aprii  ,  1912. 


The  Bell  of  Penance      (Kalem) 


the  hero  of  the  hour. 


lot  of  firing,  dur- 
ing which  the 
hero  is  hit  by  a 
bullet.  At  the 
psychological 
moment  the 
Colonel  in  charge 
of  ta  strong  de- 
tachment rushes 
up  and  rescues 
Jim  and  his  little 
one.  Congratu- 
lations follow, 
and  Jim  becomes 
A  most  effective  story  well  told. 


CRICKS  &  MARTIN, 

101,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


"MUGGIN'S  VICTORIA  CROSS."— Released  April  27th, 
Length  640  feet. 

This  month  there  is  a  reissue  of  the  well-known  film  Muggin's  V.C. 
The  story  is  one  which  may  well  be  used  as  an  aid  to  Territorial 
recruiting,  telling  as  it  does  of  the  changing  of  a  village  fool  into 
a  finished  soldier.  There  is  a  most  interesting  scene  of  fighting 
with  Pathans  and  a  thrilling  chase  after  the  hero  who  is  carrying 
a  wounded  man.  Well  staged,  and  worth  a  place  on  any  pro- 
gramme. 


ESSANAY. 

5,  Wardour  Street,  W. 

"THE  LITTLE  BLACK  BOX."— Drama.  Released  April 
21st.     Length  998  feet. 

A  detective  story  abounding  in  subtle  thrills  and  giving  one  of 
the  clearest  demonstrations  of  how  the  New  York  Criminal 
Investigation  Department  applies  the  "Third  Degree"  to  those 
suspected  of  crime  in  order  to  extort  confessions  from  them. 
Briefly  the  story  is  that  of  a  jeweller's  assistant  who  steals  a 
beautiful  pearl  necklace.  Suspicion  rests  upon  Sumner,  the 
stenographer,  who  is  arrested  despite  his  plea  of  innocence.  The 
detective  takes  him  before  the  chief  of  the  police,  who  decides  to 
investigate  the  matter  himself.  He  visits  the  rooms  of  two 
clerks  employed  at  the  office  and  puts  a  detective  to  watch  them. 
One  of  the  clerks  betrays  signs  of  guilt,  and  we  see  him  sitting  in 
a  room  with  the  chief  of  the  police  who  works  the  subtle  "  Third 
Degree ' '   by  keeping  the  suspected   man  sitting  for  hours  under 


"Baron  or  San  Tee"  (American). 

his  watchful  eye  without  a  word  being  spoken.  The  effect  this 
has  upon  the  man  is  most  cleverly  shown  by  the  actor,  whose 
facial  expression  depicts  the  horrible  torture  through  which  he 
is  passing.  Finally  he  betrays  his  secret,  thus  removing  suspicion 
from  his  fellow  clerk.  We  heartily  congratulate  the  Essanay 
Company  upon  turning  out  so  strong  a  film.  It  is  quite  worth 
starring,  and  deserves  a  top  line  on  any  bill. 

"A  WESTERN  KIMONA."— Released  April  21st.  Length 
999  feet. 

A  most  amusing  comedy  sure  to  keep  the  audience  in  roars  of 
laughter.  The  ridiculous  situations  which  arise  are  due  to 
misunderstanding.  Alkali,  who  is  devoted  to  his  wife,  learns 
from  a  newspaper  that  a  new  disease,  called  "kimonitis,"  is 
ravaging  the  community.  Arriving  home  one  day  he  finds  a 
note  from  his  wife  saying  she  has  gone  into  a  neighbouring  town 
"to  have  her  kimona  cut  out."  The  man  is  distracted.  He 
rushes  off  to  town,  and  before  he  finds  his  wife  and  baby  has  a 
number  of  most  amusing  adventures. 

"POSITIVE  PROOF."— Released  April  20th.  Length,  999 
feet. 

An  intense  and  exceptionally  powerful  story,  admirably  told 
Like  all  Essanay  films  the  quality  of  pictures  cannot  be  beaten 
for  depth  and  tone.  Tom  Morgan,  a  factory  hand,  is  tempted  by 
drink,  falls,  and  is  discharged  from  his  employment.  Morgan  reels 
out  swearing  to  be  revenged  on  Williams.  Returning  to  his 
home  he  broods  over  his  discharge,  secures  his  revolver,  and  rushes 
out  to  kill  Williams  in  spite  of  the  frantic  pleading  of  his  wife 
and  daughter.    Gaining  admittance  to  Williams's  mansion,  Morgan 


The  Blind  Miner  "  (Vitagraph). 


April.   iqi2. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


confronts  him  in  the  library  in  a  towering  rage,  but  is  restrained 
from  violence  by  Williams  who  cautions  him  to  think  of  his 
family.  With  the  promise  of  work  if  he  swears  off  drinking, 
Morgan  leaves.  A  moment  later,  Williams  seriously  wounds 
himself  with  a  revolver  he  is  cleaning.  He  is  found  unconscious, 
the  revolver  beside  him,  and  Morgan  is  instantly  suspected  of  the 
shooting.  Morgan  is  arrested  at  his  home,  brought  to  Williams's 
bedside,  where  matters  are  finally  straightened  out  through 
Morgan's  own  revolver,  which  is  produced  and  shown  not  to  have 
been  discharged,  and  Williams's  statement  of  how  he  accidentally 
shot  himself.  A  few  months  later  Tom  signs  the  pledge  and  is 
reinstated  in  a  good  position  by  Williams.  Exhibitors  should 
make  a  point  of  securing  this  film  without  delay. 

OUT  OF  THE  DEPTHS.  Released  May  12th.  Length  996 
feet. 

A  strong,  vigorous  drama,  pulsating  with  life,  as  good  as 
anything  recently  issued  with  the  Essanay  trade  mark  upon  it. 
Holds  the  attention  from  start  to  finish.  James  Grey,  a  clerk, 
appropriates  some  money  to  send  his  sick  mother  to  a  sanatorium, 
after  having  vainly  pleaded  with  his  employer  to  furnish  him 
with  the  necessary  amount.  The  shortage  is  discovered,  Grey 
is  sent  to  a  penitentiary,  and  his  mother,  unfortunately  seeing  the 
newspaper  notice,  dies  of  heart-failure.  Fifteen  years  later  Grey 
having  lived  down  his  past,  is  elected  Mayor  of  the  town  by  a 
splendid  majority.  Grey  now  becomes  engaged  to  a  charming 
society  girl  and  the  future  looks  rosy,  when  one  night  he  is 
visited  by  an  old  fellow-clerk  who  used  to  work  in  the  office 
where  Grey  stole  the  money.  The  villain  successfully  blackmails 
Grey  for  a  time,  but  is  ultimately  killed  by  lightning,  and  Grey 
is  thus  saved  from  unjust  exposure     A  splendid  film. 

"CUPID'S  LEAP  YEAR  PRANKS."— Released  May  12th. 
Length  994  feet. 

One  long  screamer  from  start  to  finish.  The  situations  are 
immense,  and  one  is  genuinely  sorry  when  the  story  comes  to  an 
end.  The  main  incident  depicts  the  dream  of  a  tramp  who  goes 
to  sleep  beside  a  big  poster  of  "La  Belle  Cassie,"  a  noted  actress 
who  comes  to  life  and  takes  Drowsy  Duster  under  her  wing.  Well 
dressed  Cassie  takes  him  to  the  theatre,  where  he  is  suddenly 
called  upon  to  take  the  part  of  the  hero  who  is  ill.  Drowsy 
costumes  up  in  old  Roman  style,  rehearses  his  role  of  sawing  off 
the  villian's  head  and  is  a  great  hit.  The  manager  engages  him 
on  the  spot  at  a  fabulous  salary  and  then  Drowsy  awakes. 

"THE  TURNING  POINT."— Released  May  5th.  Length 
97  feet. 
A  strong  and  beautifully  told  story,  which  grips  from  the  start. 
A  widow  receives  a  big  sum  of  money  from  a  railway  company  for 
right  of  way  over  her  land.  This  sum  she  deposits  in  the  town 
bank,  and  eventually  invests  it  in  a  fake  goldmine 
company.  Dan  Walton,  their  representative,  meets 
her  at  the  station,  escorts  her  to  their  office  and  shef 
hands  over  the  money  for  a  beautiful  certificate  ols 
stock.  In  taking  out  his  watch,  Walton  revea 
his  mother's  photo  in  the  case,  which  impresses  the 
widow  and  she  lovingly  strokes  the  sharper's  head 
as  she  tells  him  never  to  forget  his  mother.  Deeply 
moved,  Walton  sees  the  old  lady  off  by  train,  then 
returns  to  the  office,  secures  her  money,  tells  his 
pals  he  is  going  to  return  it  to  her  and,  when  they 
try  to  stop  him,  holds  them  at  bay  with  drawn  gun 
as  he  slowly  backs  out  of  the  door.  Walton  journeys 
to  the  widow's  country  cottage,  returns  her  money 
and  receives  her  blessing,  goes  to  the  railway  station, 
finds  himself  without  fare  back  to  the  city,  smiles 
grimly,  then  sets  out  along  the  ties,  happy  in  the 
thought  that  he  has  proved  himself  a  man. 


created  by  the  letting  loose  of  real  lions  and  tigers,  who  find  their 
way  into  the  drawing-room  of  a  house,  causing  the  terrified  guests 
to  scatter  in  all  directions.  Released  out  of  revenge  by  a  trainer 
who  had  been  discharged  by  his  mistress  for  ill-treating  the 
animals,  of  which  she  was  exceedingly  fond,  they  turn  and  rend 
the  man  who  has  so  consistently  ill-treated  them.  To  see  large 
and  powerful  animals,  such  as  one  only  expects  to  find  in 
confinement  at  the  Zoo,  running  riot  in  a  drawing-room  is 
something  so  unusual  and  thrilling  that  this  picture  is  sure  to  be 
exceedingly  popular  on  all  sides.  We  strongly  advise  any 
exhibitor  who  wants  a  real  thriller  to  make  sure  of  securing  the 
film  without  delay. 


HEPWIX, 

2,  Denman  Street,  W. 


April     11th.         Drama. 


"THE     DECEPTION."— Released 
Length  975  feet. 

A.  heart  story  which  will  appeal  to  every  audience.  Well  told 
and  admirably  acted.  Hugh  Mortimer,  a  young  analytical  chemist, 
becomes  engaged  to  a  beautiful  girl,  and  shortly  afterwards  meets 
with  an  accident  which  deprives  him  of  his  sight.  Learning  this, 
the  girl  feels  she  cannot  face  the  prospect  of  marrying  a  blind  man, 
and  in  spite  of  the  pleadings  of  her  sister,  who  tells  her  it  is  her 
duty  to  stand  by  Hugh,  she  takes  off  her  engagement  ring  and  goes 
crying  from  the  room.  Then  Esme  makes  a  desperate  resolution 
to  save  from  further  pain  the  man  she  loves.  The  voices  of  the 
two  sisters  are  so  much  alike  that  it  is  impossible  to  distinguish 
between  them.  Esme  decides  to  impersonate  her  sister,  and  leads 
Hugh  to  believe  that  the  girl  he  loves  is  true  to  him.  Eventually 
an  operation  is  successfully  performed  and  Hugh  recovers  his  sight, 
only  to  learn  that  the  girl  he  believed  to  be  true  had  failed  him  in 
the  hour  of  need  and  that  it  was  her  sister  upon  whom  he  had  all 
the  time  been  lavishing  his  affection.  Realising  her  worth  he 
declares  his  love  and  everything  ends  happily.  One  of  the  best 
films  the  Hepworth  Company  has  put  out  for  some  time.  Full  of 
pathetic  touches  it  makes  a  most  popular  appeal. 

"THE  TRAITRESS  OF  PARTON'S  COURT."— Released 
April  25th.     Length,  1,050  feet. 

Sally,  a  pretty  coster  girl,  living  in  Parton's  Court,  is  the  pet  of 
that  not  very  respectable  neighbourhood.  Her  lover  is  a  fireman, 
quartered  at  a  station  close  by,  but  the  close  attention  that  he  is 
bound  to  give  to  his  duty,  prevents  him  from  being  with  Sally 
nearly  as  much  as  he  would  wish.  One  dav,  whilst  at  work  in  her 
room,  Sally  hears  cries  of  help  proceeding  from  the  court  below, 


GAUMONT  CO., 

5-6.  Sherwood    Street,  \V. 


"THE  LIONS  REVENGE."— Released  April 
14th.     Length  920  feet. 

The  Gaumont  Company  can  always  be  relied 
upon  to  give  us  heart  stirring  films.  In  the  present 
instance  they  have  improved  upon  their  past  records. 
The  story  is  beautifully  told  in  colours,  and  mere 
words  fail  to  convey  anytidea  of  the  thrilling  situation 


"The  Turning-Point"  (Essanay). 


VI. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


and  looking  out  of  the  window,  sees  an  inhabitant  of  the  court, 
named  Bill,  committing  robbery  with  violence  on  a  weak  and 
defenceless  old  man.  Sally,  rushing  out  of  the  house,  is  too  late 
to  prevent  the  theft,  but  assists  the  old  man  to  his  feet,  and  accom- 
panies him  to  the  police-station,  where  she  gives  information  which 
speedily  leads  to  Bill's  arrest.  This  unwonted  action  causes  great 
consternation  amongst  the  inhabitants,  who  consider  Sally  a 
traitress  for  giving  away  one  of  their  number,  and  promptly  send 
her  to  Coventry  Matters  even  go  father  than  this,  and  Sally  is 
followed  by  ugly  looks,  and  menacing  gestures,  every  time  she 
goes  in  or  out  of  her  house.  She  decides  to  leave  the  neighbour- 
hood, so  packing  up  her  belongings,  she  determines  to  slip  out  one 
afternoon  at  the  time  when  the  Court  is  usually  quiet,  and  there 
are  very  few  people  about.  She  gets  down  to  the  foot  of  the 
staircase,  and  there,  a  quiet  but  sinister  figure,  stands  the  Basher. 
Poor  terrified  Sally  flies  upstairs  again,  and  locking  herself  into 
her  room,  piles  the  furniture  against  the  door  for  greater  security, 
and  crouches  trembling  in  a  corner,  wondering  what  will  happen 
next.  To  attract  attention  and  help  Sally  deliberately  fires  the 
roof,  knowing  that  the  flames  will  bring  the  firemen  to  her  aid. 
The  flames  are  soon  seen,  and  are  quickly  followed  by  a  turn-out 
of  the  fire-engines  from  the  nearest  station,  which  happens  to  be 
the  one  where  her  lover  is  employed.  He  rescues  her  amidst  a 
scene  of  wild  excitement,  and  the  story  winds  up  most  effectively 
with  a  fireman's  wedding. 


HISPANO  AGENCY, 

58,  Dean  Street.  W. 


•'THE  JUSTICE  OF  PHILIP  II."— Released  April  6th. 
Length  1,225  feet. 

The  plot  revolves  rAind  an  incident  in  the  reign  of  Philip  II.  of 
Spain,  between  the  years  1556-98.  The  opening  scenes  are  in 
Flanders,  where  a  Captain  Rodas,  jealous  of  Manfredo,  unjustly 
arrests  him.  A  protest  is  sent  to  Philip  against  the  injustice  of 
Captain  Rodas.  Manfredo  escapes  with  the  petition  in  his  pocket. 
Phillip  sees  him  in  the  distance  and  sends  a  messenger  to  bring  him 
to  his  presence  without  letting  him  know  he  is  King.  Not 
knowing  him,  Manfredo  roughly  demands  to  see  his  Majesty  and 
is  greatly  surprised  at  Court  a  few  hours  later  when  confronted 
with  the  King  in  his  official  capacity.  Phillip  says  that  a  deserter 
deserves  to  die,  and  makes  Manfredo  swear  to  return  to  Captain 
Rodas  for  execution.  Manfredo  fulfils  his  oath  and  delivers  the 
Execution  Order  to  Captain  Rodas.  The  firing  party  are  about  to 
car,ry  out  the  extreme  penalty  when  the  King's  messengers  arrive 
and  stop  the  proceedings.  The  comdemned  man  is  reprieved  and 
Captain  Rodas'  scarf  of  office  is  taken  from  him  and  placed  upon 
the  shoulder  of  Manfredo.  - 


IMP, 


F.  J.  Brockliss,  New  Compton  Street, \V. 


"AFTER  MANY  YEARS.".— Released  April  28th.  Length 
988  feet. 

A  most  pathetic  little  story  of  two  brothers  whose  lives  lead 
them  upon  different  roads — one  to  success,  the  other  to  failure. 
Both  unknown  to  the  other,  reside  in  the  same  town,  and  their 
two  little  ones  become  acquainted,  and  a  strong  friendship  results, 
between  the  child  of  the  rich  man  and  her  poor  little  neighbour. 
Ultimately  the  brothers  meet  by  accident,  and  a  most  pathetic 
scene  ensues.     Charmingly  told. 

"I  WISH  I  HAD  A  GIRL."— Released  April  28th.  Length 
470  feet. 

A  real  laughter-maker,  which  showmen  would  do  well  to 
include  in  their  programmes. 


KALEM, 


M.  P.  Sales  Agency,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


"  CAPTAIN  RIVERA'S  REWARD."— Released  >April  28th. 
Length,  1,019  feet. 

This  film  is  a  thrilling  historical  incident  of  the  days  of  the 
oversea  colonisation  of  California.     Taken  as  it  is  amidst  beautiful 


scenery  it  should  appeal  strongly,  altogether  apart  from  an  excel- 
lent story  .m 

"THE  BELL  OF  PENANCE."— Released  April  1-tth.  Length 
1,030  feet.     Drama. 

A  splendid  drama  of  the  old  mission  days  when  Cahforna  was 
a  Mexican  colony  and  under  the  domination  of  the  clerical  party. 
Costume  and  setting  are  alike  excellent,  and  the  story  itself  has  a 
strong  historical  interest.  The  Bells  of  Penance  are  still  to  be 
seen  in  many  of  the  Mexican  villages.  Altogether  an  exception- 
ally good  film. 

' '  TRAPPED  BY  WIRELESS. '  '—Released  April  18th .  Length 
1,011  feet.     Drama. 

To  English  people  American  politics  are,  as  a  rule,  confusing,  but 
this  film  is  sufficiently  dramatic  to  rank  as  a  first-class  story.  It 
deals  with  the  very  latest  invention  of  our  modern  life,  wireless 
telegraphy,  and  the  power  of  the  Press.  The  story  hinges  round 
the  affections  of  Burke,  the  city  editor  of  the  "Star,"  and  Alice 
Marshall,  daughter  of  the  reform  candidate  for  Mayor.  In  spite 
of  Burke's  efforts,  a  plot  to  ruin  Marshall  on  the  charge  of  bribery 
is  very  nearly  successful.  It  happens,  however,  that  Alice's  brother 
Bob  is  experimenting  with  a  wireless  telegraphy  outfit  and  catches 
the  message  that  betrays  the  plot.  All  ends  well,  and  the  love 
affair  comes  to  a  happy  consummation. 

"THE  HALF-BREED."— Released  April  18th.  Length  939 
feet.     Indian  drama. 

A  strong  sensational  film  with  plenty  of  fighting  in  it.  A  party 
of  adventurers,  among  them  Hazel  and  her  father,  are  starting  out 
for  the  gold-diggings,  and  they  refuse  to  take  the  half-breed  in 
their  company.  They  journey  through  the  wild  Western  Country, 
and  on  the  wav  Hazel  finds  and  succours  an  injured  Indian. 
Unknown  to  the  gold-seekers,  the  half-breed  follows  them,  and 
witnesses  the  success  of  their  prospecting.  He  tells  the  Indians 
what  he  has  seen,  induces  them  to  attack  the  white  men's  camp, 
and  under  cover  of  the  fighting  carries  off  Hazel  to  the  tent  of  one 
of  the  tribe.  It  proves  to  be  the  man  whose  life  the  girl  saved, 
and  he  overpowers  her  captor  and  restores  her  to  her  father. 
Finally  peace  is  concluded,  and  the  treacherous  half-breed  hanged. 


LUBIN, 


M,  P.  Sales  Agency.  Wardour  Street,  YV, 


"  HER  HEART'S  REFUGE.  "—April  21st.  Length  710  feet. 
Farce-comedy. 

A  strong  domestic  drama  with  a  wide  range  of  appeal.  Fred 
Miller  is  an  artist,  and  his  chosen  companion  is  a  young  society  man 
named  Harry  Lewis.  Both  are  warm  friends  of  Florence  Chapin. 
Lewis  would  gladly  win  her,  but  she  favours  Fred,  who,  however,  is 
not  enthusiastic.  Miller  goes  away  to  study  painting,  and  in  the  y 
bohemian  set  meets  a  beautiful  model,  Gladys  Stewart,  and 
becomes  infatuated.  He  proposes,  is  accepted,  and  writes  home  to 
his  parents  to  inform  them  that  he  is  shortly  to  be  married.  This 
is  a  bad  blow  to  Florence  and  affects  her  reason.  Lewis  goes  to 
Fred  and  endeavours  to  bring  him  back.  There  he  meets  the 
model  and  falls  in  love  with  her  himself.  Miller  marries  his 
first  love,  and  the  model  seeks  solace  from  the  world  as  a  member 
of  a  sisterhood. 

"THE  BABY  TRAMP.  "—April  21st.  Length  710  feet' 
Farce-comedy. 

Quite  a  good  comic  film.  Noticing  the  attentions  conferred 
upon  babies  in  the  park  by  passers-by,  two  tramps  get  an  idea  of 
using  this  scheme  for  their  own  benefit.  One  of  them  dresses  up 
as  a  baby  and  they  steal  a  go-cart.  All  goes  well  until  a  passer- 
by strokes  the  baby  under  the  chin  and  discovers  that  he  needs  a 
shave.     Trouble  follows. 

"THE  HANDICAP."— Released  April  28th.     Length  907 feet' 

One  of  the  best  films  of    Mexican  life  on  the  Frontier  recently 

presented.     The  racecourse  scenes  on  the  well-known  Juarez  race 

track  are  magnificently  done,  and  the  film  is  one  which   will   be 

particularly  appreciated  by^the  sport  loving  British  public. 

"  MY  PRINCESS."— Released  April  28th.     Length  1132  feet. 

A  very  pretty  romance  that  should  be  a  top  liner  on  the  bill. 
Lois  Sheridan,  an  orphan,  is  making  her  living  by  telling  fairy 
tales  and  other  stories  to  rich  folks  children.  Hal  Meredith, 
desiring  to  become  one  of  her  patrons,  borrows  four  kiddies  from 
his  washerwoman  and  represents  they  are  his  own.  One  of  the 
children  is  a  cripple,  and  the  little  fellow   becomes  much  attracted 


April,   1912. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


VII. 


to  the  story-teller  and  names  her  "  My  Princess."  One  day 
Lois  catches  Meredith  paying  the  children  for  their  services.  She 
is  offended  at  the  deception  and  refuses  her  money.  Meredith  who 
has  fallen  in  love  with  the  girl,  writes  her  a  letter  and  sends  it  by 
Davey.  The  cripple  is  knocked  down  by  an  auto  and  taken  to  the 
hospital.  There  he  sends  for  both  Lois  and  Meredith.  The  latter 
declares  his  love  for  the  girl  and  Davey  shows  a  passage  from  one 
of  the  fairy  tales,  which  reads,  "  And  the  prince  and  princess  were 
married  and  lived  happy  ever  after." 


KINETO,  LTD., 

80-2,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


"JACK  TAR  AMUSES  HIS  FRIENDS."  —  Released 
April  11th.     Length  355  feet. 

A  clever  and  entertaining  picture  of  sport  at  a  British  naval 
station,  presumably  Portsmouth.  Full  of  varied  interest  and 
arouses  many  a  hearty  laugh.  As  Jack  Tar  is  popular  with  every 
class  of  audience,  this  film  is  assured  a  hearty  welcome  wherever  it 
is  shown.  First  of  all  we  see  Jack  busy  superintending  a  mam- 
moth children's  treat.  Then  we  see  competitors  taking  part  in 
a  Potato  Race.  Pictures  illustrating  the  somewhat  moist  operation 
of  Tipping  the  Bucket  are  almost  as  amusing  as  the  Blindfold 
Boxing  Contest  which  brings  it  to  a  finish.  Be  sure  and  book  this 
clever  film. 

"MICROSCOPIC  POND  DWELLERS."— Released  April 
11th.     Length  440  feet. 

One  of  the  most  remarkable  scientific  films  we  have  seen  for 
some  time.  It  conveys  the  clearest  ideas  possible  of  the  lower 
form*  of  animal  life  which  abound  in  the  water.  Magnified 
beyond  all  conception,  we  make  the  acquaintance  of  such  things  as 
the  larvae  of  gnats,  water  fleas,  slugs,  and  mites,  which  almost 
make  one  shudder  as  one  sees  them  squirm  upon  the  screen.  A 
film  worthy  of  all  praise.  Should  be  popular  with  audiences 
of   a  scientific  turn  of  mind. 

"SOME  EASTERN  INDUSTRIES."— Released  April  11th. 
Length  335  feet. 

A  very  fine  travel  subject  depicting  scenes  in  the  Near  East, 
including  Turkish  methods  of  husbandry  and  some  of  the 
principal  industries  of  Symra,  including  the  making  of  carpets. 


MAJESTIC  CO., 

Rupert  Court,  W. 


Length 


"A    GAME    FOR    TWO.  "—Released   April   24th. 
825  feet. 

A  thoroughly  entertaining  Comedy  Drama.  John  Hartman  is  an 
author  and  has  a  fair  collaborator,  Mrs.  Dewitt  Turner,  a  widow. 
Hartman's  wife  is  not  at  all  unaware  of  the  widow's  attractiveness, 
and  resents  the  hours  he  spends  with  her.  Hartman  breaks  an 
opera  engagement,  and  hands  his  wife  over  to  Smithers,  a  bachelor. 
His  wife  resents  this,  and  determines  to  give  her  husband  a  lesson. 
How  she  goes  to  Smithers'  apartments,  how  her  husband  arrives, 
how  she  locks  them  up  in  uncomfortable  quarters  for  the  night, 
makes  one  of  the  best  comedies  the  Majestic  has  recently  done. 

"AN  OLD  LADY  OF  TWENTY.  "—Released  April  17th- 
Length  650  feet. 

A  pretty  little  film.     There  are  only  two  characters  in  it,  but 
both  are  amusing  and  interesting — short  and  sweet, 
/ 


NESTOR    CO., 

Prieur&  Co.,  Film  House,  Gerrard  Street,  W. 


"THE  MAN  FROM  THE  FOOT  HILLS."— Released  April 
20th.     Lenth  1,000  feet. 

Tom  Evans  is  out  of  work  ;  his  wife  Jennie  is  sick.  He  obtains 
work  on  a  ranch  and  upon  request  is  given  part  of  his  salary. 
Jim  Hoover,  the  foreman  has  gambled  and  lost.  Neither  Tom 
nor  the  ranchman  observe  his  entrance.  Jim  sees  the  open  safe 
and  slips  behind  a  book-case.  Tom  exits  but  in  his  hurry  leaves 
his  coat  on  the  chair.     The   foreman  sna'ches  up  the  coat,  and  as 


the  ranchman,  Col.  Foster,  is  closing  the  safe,  he  throws  the  coat 
over  the  ranchman's  neck  tieing  the  sleeves,  takes  the  money  from 
the  safe  and  runs  out.  Tom  hears  the  noise  from  the  outside 
and  returns  just  as  Jim  comes  out.  He  sees  the  bags  of  gold  ; 
holds  Jim  up  with  his  gun  and  commands  him  to  drop  it.  He 
obeys  and  runs,  and  as  Tom  picks  it  up  the  ranchman  rushes  out, 
sees  Tom  with  the  gold,  and,  not  having  seen  who  took  the 
money,  accuses  him.  Later,  the  foreman,  believing  he  is  dying, 
confesses  to  the  theft,  and  all  ends  happily.  A  top  liner,  and 
one  of  Nestor's  best. 


MILANO. 


F.J.  Brockliss,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


"A  DAY'S  SHOOTING."— Released  April  28th.  Length 
585  feet. 

A  humorous  story  in  which  the  versatile  comedian  Kelly  plays 
the  leading  part.     A  most  amusing  incident,  and  all  too  short. 


NORDISK. 

25,  Cecil  Court,  W.C. 


"A  DANGEROUS  PLAY."— Released  April  13th.  Length 
2,500  feet. 

A  most  unconventional  film  taken  amidst  snow  scenery,  intro- 
ducing horses  drawing  sleighs  and  many  other  out-of-the-way 
effects.  A  long  subject  but  one  of  heavy  dramatic  interest. 
Harrison,  a  millionaire,  has  a  great  desire  that  his  only  child, 
Eve,  should  marry  into  the  aristocracy,  and  to  this  end  calls  in 
the  aid  of  his  solicitor.  The  latter  suggests  the  young  but 
impoverished  Duke  of  Rouen,  who  is  found  willing  to  enter  into  a 
wea'thy  marriage.  Eve  is  very  much  opposed  to  the  plan.  She 
hurries  to  the  rooms  of  her  sweetheart,  Robert,  and  his  actor 
friend,  Willy.  While  there  the  girl  makes  the  discovery  that 
Robert  is  extremely  like  the  Duke,  and  persuades  her  lover  to 
impersonate  the  nobleman.  Soon  after  Eve  tells  her  parent  that 
she  will  be  pleased  to  meet  the  Duke,  and  close  upon  this  comes  a 
no'e  saying  that  he  has  obtained  unexpected  leave  and  will  visit 
Harrison  almost  immediately.  Robert  "  made  up  "  as  the  Duke 
arrives,  and  three  weeks  later  sees  the  wedding  day.  Meanwhile, 
at  the  Army  Officers'  Club  the  real  Duke  is  bombarded  with 
questions  concerning  his  supposed  marriage.  He  realises  the  hoax 
that  has  been  perpetrated,  and  pursues  and  overtakes  the  culprits, 
but  they  escape  and  hasten  to  a  clergyman  to  be  legally  united. 
They  have  just  a  long  enough  start,  and  the  last  words  have 
passed  the  cleric's  lips  when  Harrison  and  his  friends  break  in. 

"AN  AEROPLANE  INVENTOR."— Released  April  20th. 
Length  2,000  feet.     Drama. 

A  good  aeronaut  film  dealing  with  the  sad  story  of  a  young 
inventor  who  has  trouble  in  obtaining  sufficient  money  to  finance 
his  own  invention,  an  aeroplane.  All  ends  well,  the  wicked  money- 
lender disregarding  the  advice  of  the  officials,  insists  upon  going 
up  in  the  machine.     There  is  a  bad  smash  and  he  is  killed. 


PATHE    FRERES, 

31-3,  Charing  Cross  Kd.,  W.C. 


"THE  PATH  OF  ATONEMENT."— Released  April  10th 
Length  2,528  feet. 

A  strong  hearty  story  full  of  interest  and  variety,  which,  despite 
its  exceptional  length,  grips  the  attention  from  start  to  finish.  The 
story  is  divided  into  three  parts,  and  most  effective  local  colour  is  in- 
troduced by  partly  placing  the  scene  of  the  incidents  in  France  and 
partly  in  Algiers.  The  story  is  that  of  a  banker's  son  who  falls  in 
love  with  an  adventuress  in  league  with  a  band  of  thieves,  who 
extort  money  from  John  under  various  pretexts.  This  continues 
until  he  not  only  succeeds  in  ruining  himself,  but  his  father  as  well. 
John  flees  in  order  to  escape  justice,  and  passes  through  various 
vicissitudes,  finally  falling  in  love  with  his  employer's  daughter 
whom  he  marries,  and  then  stricken  with  remorse  he  remembers 
his  family  and  endeavours  to  seek  them  out, 'only  to  find  that  his 
mother  is  dead  and  his  father  blind  owing  to  the  troubles  brotight 


vm. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


upon  him  by  his  good-for-nothing  son  who  had  since  redeemed  his 
past.  John  finds  his  father  and  gains  the  old  man's  forgiveness 
through  the  efforts  of  his  wife  and  child.  An  exceedingly  fine 
film. 

"THE  MILLS  IN  JOY  AND  SORROW."— Released  April 
10th.     Length  580  feet. 

An  entrancing  picture  of  life  among  the  Dykes  of  Holland.  The 
story  is  most  sympathetically  told  how  a  miller's  little  son  invents 
a  toy  windmill,  which  is  destroyed  by  a  tramp  who  has  been  re- 
fused food  when  calling  at  the  mill.  The  child,  broken-hearted, 
takes  the  wrecked  toy  to  his  father,  who  thrashes  the  tramp.  The 
man  vows  vengeance,  and  watching  his  opportunity  sets  fire  to  the 
mill  one  night,  and  we  then,  have  a  most  exciting  picture  showing 
the  inhabitants'  escaping  from  the  doomed  mill,  which  is  burned 
to  the  ground.     Most  realistic. 


POWERS. 

F.  J.  Brockliss,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


"JUG  O'  RUM."— Released  May  1st.     Length  995  leet. 

Bound  to  make  your  audience  laugh  ;  this  film  depicts  the 
adventures  of  a  bottle  of  rum,  which  finds  its  way  to  a  farm  where 
the  mistress  is  a  teetotaller  of  the  extreme  kind.  Its  owner  labels 
it  "  Poison,"  and  thenceforward  there  are  endless  laughs. 


RELIANCE  CO., 

Rdpert  Court,  W. 


"  THE  QUARREL."— Released  April  27th.  Length  720  feet 
An  entertaining  Comedy  Drama  with  an  amusing  climax.  The 
husband,  wife  and  best  man  are  dining  together  in  honour  of  the 
first  anniversary  of  the  wedding.  The  two  men  imbibe  too  much 
champagne,  and  the  husband  and  wife  leave  the  restaurant.  As  the 
best  man  gets  up  he  finds  a  bracelet,  and  decides  to  go  to  their 
home  and  return  it.  In .  the  meantime  the  couple  have  arrived 
home  and  quarrelled  over  the  husband's  intoxicated  condition. 
Realising  the  situation,  he  sobers  up  and  hits  upon  an  idea  for 
reconciling  them.  He  puts  his  handkerchief  over  his  face  and 
seizing  a  silver  brush,  handle  before  him,  he  shouts  "Hands  up!" 
The  wife  thinks  it  is  a  regular  burglar  and  screams.  The  husband 
rushes  in  and  takes  his  wife  in  his  arms  to  protect  her.  "When  the 
best  man  sees  that  the  couple  are  so  busy  with  their  reconciliation 
that  even  a  burglar  is  forgotten,  he  takes  off  his  mask  and  makes 
his  errand  known,  then  quickly  leaves. 

"BRONCHO   FILMS." 

Exhibitors  are  advised  to  see  the  new  Broncho  films.  They  are 
short,  thrilling,  and  of  a  strong  dramatic  interest.  Our  represen- 
tative has  already  seen  two  films, "The  Return  of  Company  D  "  and 
"For  the  Love  of  Redwing,"  both  of  which  are  really  excellent 
short  Western  films. 


"THE  RECKONING.'— Released  April  6th.  Length,  875 
feet.     Drama. 

One  of  the  celebrated  REP.  Northern  productions.  The  scene 
is  set  in  the  goldfields  of  the  Far  North,  and  there  we  have  a 
drama  showing  the  play  of  primitive  emotions  beyond  the  zone 
where  civilised  law  carries  its  sway.  Justice  out  there  is  not  one 
of  police  and  magistrates,  but  one  of  strong  men  and  straight 
shooting.  Real  Esquimaux  dogs  and  sleighs,  real  snow  and 
loghouses — an  actual  setting  in  Klondyke.  Nothing  more  need  be 
said.     The  film  is  a  thriller  from  the  word  go  ! 


REX. 


F.  J.  Brockliss,  New  Compton  Street,  W. 


"ANGELS  UNAWARES."— Released  April  27th.  Length  1,000 
feet. 

A  strong,  well-balanced  story,  excellently  told.  Husband  and 
wife  have  gradually  drifted  apart,  each  carrying  on  a  secret  liaison. 
At  this  juncture  his  parents  pay  the  couple  a  visit,  and  unaware  of 
the  true  position  of  affairs,  believe  they  are  still  lovers.  One  night 
during  the  visit,  while  they  are  chatting  and  discussing  little 
nothings,  his  father  turns  the  topic  of  conversation  to  the  romance 
of  the  younger  people's  younger  days  ;  out  of  the  past  he  summons 
little  pictures  of  a  man  and  a  maid  knowing  of  nothing  but  each 
other's  love  and  its  happiness,  little  meaningless  words  significant 
of  things  no  language  can  fully  interpret — pictures  and  words  for- 
gotten in  the  oblivion  of  marital  dissension.  Gradually  they  are 
drawn  together  again,  and  when  the  old  people  bring  their  visit  to 
a  close  the  young  couple  find  they  have  been  entertaining — Angels 
unawares  !  Beautifully  and  most  sympathetically  told.  Showmen 
should  secure  this  film. 

"A  SANE  ASYLUM."— Released  May  4th.  Length  1,000 
feet. 

A  rattling  story,  full  of  hearty  laughs,  and  sure  of  a  warm 
welcome.  Tells  the  story  of  a  young  doctor  whose  uncle  lends 
him  his  house  during  his  absence  abroad.  He  put  up  a  plate 
and  awaits  in  vain  for  patients.  To  occupy  his  time  he  makes  love 
to  a  sweet  little  actress,  Dolly  Dimple.  She  goes  on  tour,  and  soon 
the  company  is  stranded  and  she  sends  a  wire  to  her  friend  telling 
him  of  her  plight.  He  invites  her  and  the  entrie  company  to 
make  the  house  their  temporary  home.  High  jinks  follow,  and  all 
unexpectedly  the  uncle  returns,  and  the  members  of  the  company 
have  to  pretend  they  are  all  insane.  The  uncle  is  delighted  to 
find  his  nephew  doing  so  well,  but  causes  complications  by  falling 
in  love  with  the  soubrette,  posing  as  a  nurse,  and  then  learns  of 
the  deception  practised  upon  him.  Ultimately  he  overlooks  his 
nephew's  peccadilloes,  and  all  ends  well. 


SELIG. 

Gerrard  Street,  V. 


REP. 


American  Film  Releases,  Cecil  Court,  W.C 


_ 


"  HUMAN  NATURE."— Released  April  11th.  Length  1,000 
feet.     Comedy. 

A  good  comedy  subject,  showing  the  failings  as  wejl  as  the 
virtues  of  human  nature.  It  is  the  story  of  a  poor  old  father,  who 
at  the  end  of  his  life  finds  himself  de  trap  in  his  own  family. 
Unconsciously  he  gets  further  and  further  out  of  sympathy,  and  at 
last  is  relegated  to  a  garret  where  nobody  in  the  house  pays  any 
attention  to  him. 

An  old  friend  finds  him  in  this  situation,  and  in  order  to  end  it 
he  starts  a  rumour  that  the  old  man  is  possessed  of  money,  and 
lends  him  a  bag  of  coins  to  show  the  family.  Everything  changes, 
and  they  vie  with  one  another  to  shower  favours  upon  the  old 
man.  Eventually  in  order  to  keep  up  the  change  in  his  fortunes 
the  old  fellow  makes  a  will,  leaving  all  his  possessions  to  be  equally 
divided  among  his  family.  On  his  death  a  frenzied  search  ensues 
and  at  last  the  will  is  found.  To  their  consternation  it  merely 
states  that  he  has  nothing  to  leave,  and  that  "They  will  receive  a 
great  reward  for  their  kindness  in  the  Great  Hereafter." 


"THE  WIDOW  OF  RICKIE  O'NEAL."— Released  April 
14th.     Length  1,000  feet. 

A  quite  unusual  Western  film  and  most  entertaining.  Rickie 
O'Neal,  not  altogether  happy  and  content  with  his  domestic 
surroundings  decides  to  end  it  all  in  the  icy  river,  but  the  water 
is  too  cold,  and  Rickie  concludes  that  it's  just  as  well  to  leave 
his  clothes  near  the  water,  shave  off  his  beard  as  a  disguise  and 
live  the  simple  life.  He  becomes  a  caller  at  a  neighbouring  ranch, 
controlled  by  the  Widow  Manning,  who  can  only  see  in  Rickie 
the  love  light  of  her  long  lost  John.  This  angers  the  hired  girl, 
and  she  leaves.  Widow  O'Neal  arrives  and  applies  for  the  job, 
still  lamenting  the  death  of  her  dear  Rickie,  who  makes  his 
escape  through  the  rear.  T!le  hearts  of  the  cowboys  are  touched 
and  they  give  the  poor  widow  a  wild  west  show  benefit.  Disguised 
Rickie  attends.  The  money  comes  in  by  the  handful,  and  the 
widow  is  again  on  easy  street.  Rickie  decides  to  seek  his  first 
love,  as  the  money  looks  to  him  like  "easy  life,"  and  he  again 
becomes  the  idol  of  the  home  of  Rickie  O'Neal.  Altogether  a 
money  maker. 

"THE  HYPNOTIC  DETECTIVE."— Released  April  21st. 
Length    1,000   feet. 

A  thrilling  detective  drama,  the  second  of  the  well-known 
Professor      Lockslev       series.       Dr.      Pelham,      a      master      of 


April,  19 12. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


criminals,  proposes  to  Widow  Morton  and  is  refused.  Her 
son,  a  promising  young  attorney,  is  easily  hoodwinked 
into  the  belief  that  the  doctor,  for  some  unknown  reason, 
is  about  to  become  his  true  benefactor.  In  revenge  for 
the  widow's  refusal  the  old  doctor  works  out  a  clever  idea,  which 
proves  a  powerful  influence  in  his  favour  in  combating  the 
minions  of  the  law,  who  are  looking  for  a  motive  for  the  crime. 
Joe  Dorgan  and  his  wife,  two  notorious  characters,  help  him,  and 
so  adroitly  were  their  plans  laid,  that  it  was  only  through  the 
timely  services o'  the  keen-witted,  quick-thinking  mental  machinery 
of  the  celebrated  Locksley.  whose  superior  genius  was  pitted 
against  theirs,  that  the  unfortunate  trio  was  brought  to  the  bar 
of  justice. 

"THE  BROKEN  SPUR.'  —Released  April  18.  Length  1,000 
feet.     A  good  Selig  Western  that  holds  the  interest  throughout. 

Nellie  Pitts  resents  the  attention  of  Jim  Keith,  a  ranchman,  and 
calls  Ed  Harvey,  her  sweetheart,  to  her  assistance.  Later  Jim 
attempts  to  make  love  to  her,  and  when  she  repulses  him,  rides 
awav  swearing  revenge.  Mr.  Pitt  sells  a  herd  of  horses.  Jim, 
hiding  and  seeing  the  buyer  pay  Mr.  Pitts,  also  sees  him  bury  a 
tin  box  containing  the  money,  and  steals  it.  He  then  goes  to  Mr. 
Pitts  and  tells  him  he  will  destroy  the  mortgage  if  he  can  marry 
Nellie,  and  when  Mr.  Pitts  refuses  to  consent,  Jim  threatens  to 
foreclose  as  soon  as  the  mortgage  is  due,  and  leaves.  Ed  brings 
Nell  home  and  places  a  ring  on  her  finger.  Mr.  Pitts  discovers 
the  loss  of  his  money.  He  goes  home  heartbroken  and  tells 
his  family.  Jim  comes  in  and  Mr.  Pitt  tells  him.  Nellie  agrees 
to  sacrifice  herself.  Ed  and  Harry  strike  upon  a  plan.  They 
wait  until  Jim  leaves  his  house,  enter,  search  the  rooms,  and  find 
the  gold.  Gathering  the  boys,  they  get  the  Sheriff  and  return 
with  him  to  Mr.  Pitt's  home,  where  Jim  is  arrested  and  Harry  is 
thanked  by  all 

"  DISILLUSIONED."— Released  21st.     Length  1,000  feet. 

A  thoroughly  amusing  film  showing  the  cowboy  as  he  really  is. 
A  distinct  change  from  the  usual  cowboy  hero  of  the  picture  theatre 
Ranch.     A  delightful  comedy. 


URBANORA, 

Wardour    Street,    W. 


"A  TRAGEDY  OF  THE  SEA."— Released  April  17th. 
Length  995  feet.     Drama. 

A  very  picturesque  film  dealing  with  the  simple  life  of  fisher 
folk. 

"TO  CONQUER  OR  DIE."— Released  April  17th.  Length, 
895  feet.     Comedy  Drama. 

A  strikingly  magnificent  costumed  revolutionary  episode.  A 
plot  which  centres  round  an  attempt  made  by  Horace  Grandlieu, 
the  son  of  General  Grandlieu,  and  his  sweetheart  Lucienne  to 
prevent  the  edict  ordering  the  death  of  General  Grandlieu  for 
having  failed  to  conquer  in  a  battle.  The  edict  is  to  be  transmitted 
to  the  troops  by  telegraphic  semaphor,  an  instrument  just  at  that 
period  invented.  Horace  and  Lucienne,  endeavouring  to  save  the 
General,  destroy  the  apparatus,  but  are  arrested  and  thrown  into 
prison.  Ultimately  the  General  is  victorious,  returns  in  triumph 
to  Paris,  where,  using  his  influence,  he  obtains  the  release  of  his 
son  and  Lucienne. 


VITAGRAPH. 

1517,  Cecil  Court,  W.C. 


"JEAN  INTERVENES."— Released  April  18th,  Length 
800  feet.     Comedy. 

A     bright     comedy,    introducing     "Jean,"      the      well-known 
Vitagraph  Co.'s  collie  dog.     The  theme  of  the  plot  is  the  old  one, 
of  the  fondness  of  a  wife  for  pets,  and  the  jealousy  of  a  husband. 
The  setting  and  the  acting  alike  are  good,  and  the  handling  of  a- 
very  delicate  situation  by   "  Jean  "  is  a  remarkable  piece  of  work 

"THE  BLIND  MINER."— Released  April  20th.  Length 
961   feet.  Drama. 

At  the  present  time  a  reproduction  of  actual  scenes  in  the  life  of 
a  miner  has  a  very  telling  pull  with  the  public.  This  film  has 
genuine  thrills  and  the  setting  is  in  an  actual  coal  mine.  The 
story  is  simple  and   free  of  melo-dramatic  exaggeration,  neverthe- 


less not  for  an  instant  does  it  fail  to  hold  the  attention  of  the 
audience.  The  scenes  at  the  pit-head  of  the  panic  and  horror  of 
the  crowd  when  the  explosion  occurs  and  the  prompt  and  efficient 
acting  of  the  mine  authorities  are  vividly  expressive  of  fhe  danger 
of  the  miner's  life. 

"LOVE  FINDS  A  WAY."— Released  April  25th.  Length 
1,017  feet.     Comedy. 

A  striking  story  of  a  love  affair  between  an  employer's  daughter 
and  his  clerk.  The  father  gets  into  difficulties  and  proposes  to  sell 
his  daughter  to  a  millionaire  who,  although  objectionable  to  the 
girl,  has  set  his  heart  on  marrying  her.  The  father,  the  daughter, 
and  the  millionaire  start  in  an  automobile,  which  breaks  down  near 
the  railway,  station  where  the  clerk  has  now  found  employment. 
Seizing  the  opportunity  the  clerk  and  the  girl  leave  by  a  hand-car, 
and  stopping  to  pick  up  a  minister  they  press  him  into  service  and 
are  married  on  the  car.  Their  pursuers  in  the  automobile  onlv 
reach  them  when  the  marriage  has  been  consummated,  and  then 
all  ends  well. 

"INDIAN  ROMEO  AND  JULIET."- Released  April  25th. 
Length  1,010  feet. 

This  film  is  quite  o\it  of  the  ordinary,  considering  that  it  has 
strong  romantic  and  poetic  tendencies.  It  is  an  attempt  to  translate 
poetry  into  cinematography.  Both  the  acting  and  the  magnificent 
natural  setting  convey  to  the  observer  a  vivid  pxture  of  the 
romance  of  the  red  man.  The  story  is  practically  that  of  a  red 
Indian  Romeo  and  Juliet.  Altogether  a  remarkable,  film  and  a 
distinct  improvement  on  previous  Indian  drama. 

"A  TIMELY  RESCUE."— Released  April  27th.  Length 
1,020  feet. 

•  Showmen  who  want  a  good  moving  battle  scene  should  take  this 
film.  The  plot  deals  with  a  thrilling  rescue  during  the  Boer  War, 
effected  by  a  man  who  had  betrayed  his  friend.  He  finds  in  the 
man  he  rescues  that  friend,  and,  himself  seriously  wounded, 
rights  the  wrong,  and  restores  the  rescued  man  to  his  sweetheart 
by  a  death-bed  confession.  The  battle  scene  is  quite  an  excellent 
piece  of  work. 

"CAPTAIN  BARNACLE'S  MESSMATE.— Released  April 
18th.     Length  921  feet.     Comedy. 

A  screamingly  funny  film  portraying  the  adventures  of  Captain 
Jack  Bunce  while  ashore.  Bunce  having  lost  all  his  money  in  a 
saloon  seeks  refuge  in  a  boarding  house  ;  having  no  money  with 
which  to  pay  his  board,  he  is  about  to  be  turned  out,  when  the  land- 
lady, who  is  anxious  to  secure  a  second  husband,  allows  him  to  stop 
for  a  week  in  the  hope  that  he  will  propose  to  her.  The  week 
expires,  but  the  captain  is  still  coy.  In  order  to  force  him  she 
presents  his  bill,  and  ruefully  the  old  salt  consents  to  marry  her. 
Later  he  reconsiders  his  decision  and  attemps  to  escape,  but  is 
detected.  His  boots  are  taken,  and  he  is  locked  in  his  room  to 
await  the  marriage  day.  At  last  he  succeeds  in  getting  a  letter 
carried  to  his  old  friend  Captain  Barnacle.  The  rest  of  the  film 
deals  with  the  masterly  strategy  employed  by  Barnacle  to  rescue 
Bunce  from  the  widow's  lair,  culminating  in  his  successful  escape, 
and  in  the  last  scene  we  see  Bunce — once  more  at  peace — sitting  by 
Barnacle's  fire  side. 

"THE  SCAPEGOAT."— Released  April  7th.  Length  1,000 
feet.     Drama. 

As  an  exciting  picture  of  genuine  Western  life,  this  film  will 
take  a  lot  of  beating.  There  is  none  of  the  usual  hackneyed 
cowboy  hero  business  but  a  strong  real  life  drama,  introducing  that 
splendid  rider  Tom  Mix  in  the  leading  part.  The  play  moves  at 
high  speed,  and  there  is  not  a  dull  moment   thoroughout  the  film. 


WALTURDAW    LTD. 


Gerkard  Street,  W. 


"THE  BETTER  WAY."— Exclusive. 

In  this  film  Messrs.  Walturdaw  have  a  really  powerful  modern 
drama  in  which  we  have  Miss  Asta  Neilssen  in  the  title-role.  The 
interest  never  slackens  all  through,  and  there  are  many  wonder- 
fully pathetic  scenes.  The  ending  in  itself  exemplifies  the  title — 
Maternal  love  triumphs  and  reunites  the  parents.  The  subject 
of  this  film  is  one  that  is  ever  present  in  its  appeal.  We  have  the 
old  and  everlasting  tragedy  of  the  humble  couple,  the  drunken 
husband  and  the  suffering  wife,  and  we  follow  the  play  of  the 
various  emotions  that  harrow  the  wife.  Eventually  all  comes  to  a 
happy  ending,  and  the  family  are  again  content.  The  struggle 
between  good  and  evil  is  most  admirably  portrayed  by  Miss  Asta 
Neilssen,  who  is  in-every  way  a  remarkably  accomplished  actress. 


Supplement  to   IHt  llNbMA,  %  April,   1912. 


To 

EVERYBODY 
GENUINELY 
INTERESTED 


We  will  afford  facilities 
to  see  under  actual  work- 
ing   conditions     the     film 


CHRISTOPHER 
COLUMBUS. 


We  want  all  showmen  to 
see  what  it  is  possible  for 
them  to  do  when  working 
in  conjunction  with  a  film 
service  that  has  its  cus- 
tomers' interests  at  heart. 


April,  1912. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


XI. 


Write  tolthe 


NEW  CENTURY 
FILM  SERVICE 

LTD. 

2  &  4,  Quebec  St.,    48,  Rupert  St., 
LEEDS.  LONDON,  W. 

Agent  for  Northern  Counties— W.  L.  BEED, 
148,    Westgate    Road,   Newcastle-on-Tyne. 


Xll. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


A    NEW    PROJECTOR. 

Me^rs.  Jury  are  putting  on  the  market  a  new  projector, 
which  will  be  known  as  the  Model  No.  1.  The  machine  will  be 
a  great  advance  on  those  already  existing.  The  design  has 
been  carefully  thought  out,  and  the  result  is  a  mechanically 
perfect  instrument  that  will  last  for  years,  'throughout  great 
attention  has  been  paid  to  strength  of  working  parts  and  ease 
of  adjustment.  By  a  new  device  the  Maltese  Cross  gear  can 
be  easily  adjusted,  only  a  set  screw  and  a  nut  having  to  be 
slackened.  By  this  means  the  timing  can  be  easily  corrected 
without  interfering  with  the  gear  or  using  a  file.  A  special 
automatic  drop  switcher  is  provided,  which  cuts  off  the  light 
as  soon  as  the  speed  of  the  machine  falls  below  the  safety 
minimum. 

Messrs.  Jury  have  paid  particular  attention  to  the  spools 
and  rollers  over  which  the  film  is  fed,  and  by  a  patented 
device  all  lateral  vibration  is  avoided,  thus  doing  away  with 
the  irritating  sideways  swaying  that  spoils  so  many  good  films. 
The  machine  is  strong,  compact,  and  free  from  ''gadgets," 
every  part  is  well  thought  out,  and  reflects  the  greatest  credit 
on  the  designers,  and  we  have  no  hesitation  in  recommending 
it  as  the  very  latest  thing  in  projectors  on  the  market. 


It  is  not  very  long  since  the  Pioneer  Agency,  Ltd.,  found  the 
need  of  more  central  premises,  and  removed  to  27,  Cecil- 
court,  Charing  Cross-road,  W.C.  The  company,  having  in- 
creased its  capital,  is  securing  a  big  increase  of  business  in 
every  class  of  accessory  and  apparatus  required  for  the  picture 
theatre. 


The  Express  Film  Service,  Ltd.,  have  just  moved  into  new  and  more 
commodious  offices  at  11,  Denman  Street,  W.,  and  to  celebrate  the 
occasion  a  largely  attended  reception  was  held  on  Saturday  last. 
The  progress  which  this  enterprising  firm  is  making  is  most 
gratifying  to  all  concerned. 


Mr.  Harry  Furness,  the  well-known  caricaturist,  who 
made  his  name  in  the  pages  of  "  Punch,"  bas  been  busy 
at  his  seaside  home  at  Hastings  in  adding  to  his  many 
other  attainments  by  writing  cinematograph  comedies. 
He  has  just  left  for  America  to  join  Mr.  Edison,  with 
whom  he  will  co-operate  in  the  production  of  these  plays, 
and  we  understand  that  he  will  also  "  dress  "  and  person- 
ally rehearse  them. 

Mr.  Potts  has  recently  taken  over  the  management  of 
the  Casino  de  Paris  in  Oxford  Street. 

Mr.  Seymour  Hodges,  the  courteous  manager  of  the 
Electric  Palace,  Marble  Arch,  has  recently  installed  a 
new  screen  which  adds  to  the  effectiveness  of  the 
pictures  shown. 

Mr.  James  Lowes  personally  describes  his  "Star" 
pictures  at  the  King's  Hall,  Newcastle.  His  idea  is 
worthy  of  emulation  in  other  directions. 

Mr.  Charles  Vernon  of  the  Harrow  Picturedrome  is 
to  be  congratulated  upon  the  success  which  attended  his 
"  All-British  week  "  recently. 

Mr.  J.  J.  Backhouse,  who  was  at  one  time  with 
Electric  Theatres,  Ltd.,  has  taken  over  the  management 
of  the  Empire  Theatre,  Southall. 

Mr.  J.  F.  Brockliss  has  returned  from  his  visit  to  the 
States  doubtless  with  innumerable  ideas  for  extending 
his  business  in  this  country.  He  was  only  in  London, 
however,  for  twenty  four  hours,  and  then  left  for  Paris. 

Mr.  Alfred  West  has  prepared  an  illustrated  and 
descriptive  synopsis  of  his  work  "  Life  in  our  Navy  and 
Army,"  a  copy  of  which  has  just  been  accepted  by  His 
Majesty  the  King. 


THE  CINEMA. 


ORDER    FORM. 


To  the  Publishers, 

The  Cinema,  21,  North  Audley  St.,  \Y. 

Please   send   me    (post   free)    Twelve 
Issues   of   THE  CINEMA,  commencing  with 

the   issue   of for 

which  I  enclose  P.O.  for  2s. 

Name 

Address 

Date 


FILMS  FOR  HIRE 


CELLULOID. 

Per  1,000  feet  per  week. 
Weekly  Change. 

7s.  6d. 
Bi-weekly  Change. 

10s.  Od. 

Tri-weekly  Change. 

12s.  6d. 

Daily  Change. 

15s.  Od. 


NON-FLAM. 

Per  1,000  Jeet  per  week. 
Weekly  Change. 

15s.  Od. 
Bi-weekly  Change. 

17s.  6d. 

Tri-weekly  Change. 

20s.  Od. 

Daily  Change. 

22s.  6d. 


We  have  more  than  ONE  THOUSAND  SUBJECTS 
in  stock,  embracing  every  phase  of  Cinemato- 
graphy, in  splendid  condition. 

Send  for  our  List,  examine  it,  and  arrange  your  own 
Programme.     You  will  be  satisfied. 


SPECIAL  ATTENTION  GIVEN 
TO   SUNDAY    PROGRAMMES, 

The  IDEAL  FILM  RENTING  CO. 

45,  Gerrard  Street,  London,  W. — A.  M.  KAY,  Manager. 


Telephone  No.  : 
CITY  3672. 


Telegraphic  Address: 
"  IDEFILM,  LONDON." 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


17 


ELECTRIC     PALACES,     LTD. 


BALANCE     SHEET,     3rd     FEBRUARY,     1912. 


LIABILITIES. 


Authorised  Share  Capital     ... 

Issued  Share  Capital — 

149,635  Shares  of  10s.  each   ... 
Less  Calls  in  Arrcar 

Six  per  cent.  Debentures 

Less  Amount  redeemed  ... 


Add  Interest  accrued  thereon 

Si  miry  Creditors  

Premiums  on  Shares      

Proitt  amd  Loss  Account — 

Balance  brought  forward  at  4th  Febru- 
ary, 1911       

Add    Profit,    as    per    Profit    and    Loss 
Account       


Deduct — 
Amount     transferred 
to     Leasehold    Re- 
demption   Account        £5,000    0     0 
Depreciation   of    Fur- 
niture    1,792     0    0 


£        s.    <1. 
75.C00    0    0 


74.817  10 
10  18 

0 

0 

24.250  0 
400  0 

0 
0 

23,850  0 
156  7 

0 
10 

74.806  12    0 


24.0C6    7  10 

9,340  16    2 

694    5    0 


4.187     6  10 


14,088     0     1 


ASSETS. 

Freehold     and     Leasehold      Premises, 
Buildings,     Furniture,     Fittings, 

Equipment,  4c,  &c,  at  cost    

Deduct        Depreciation        of         Furniture 

£1,792     0    0 

Redemption  of  Leaseholds   £5,000    0    0 


122,005  10    5 


6.792    0    0 


Sundry  Debtors  and  Deposits        

Cash  at  Bank  and  in  Hand 

Sundry  Assets,  including  Rates,  Insurances 
&c,  paid  in  advance         

Film  Rights  (at  Cost),  Stock  on  Hand, 
Electrical  Apparatus,  and  Con- 
sumables     


115,213  10    5 

1,185  19  11 

2.C69  6    3 

929  11    5 


932  19  11 


18.275    6  11 


6.792    0    0 
11.483    6  11 


£120,331     7  11 


£120,331     7  11 


4Dr.        TRADING  AND  PROFIT  AND   LOSS  ACCOUNT,  from  6th  February,  1911,  to  3rd  February,  1912.        £r. 


To  Salaries  and  Wages   ...         

,,  General   Petty  Cash  Expenses,   Advertising.  Bill  Posti 

&c 

,.  Rent,  Rates,  Taxes,  Insurance,  Ac 

,.  Electricity  and  Gas 

,,  Cost  of  Entertainments      

..  Repairs  and  Maintenance 

,,  Gross  Profit  on  Theatres     


To  Head  Office  Staff  and  Secretary's  Salaries.  Rent,  Printing 
and  Stationery,  General  Expenses,  &c,  &c. 

Interest  on  Loans      

Interest  on  Debentures       

Income  Tax      ...         

,  Legal  and  Professional  Charges 

,  Expenses  of  Opening  Theatres      

,  Directors'  Fees  

.  Expenses  of  Debenture  Issue,  &c.  

..  Balance,  being  Profit,  carried  to  Balance  Sheet         


£   8. 

d. 

11.004  7 

0 

3.C53  6 

7 

7.755  16 

2 

4,045  19 

0 

15.355  1 

1 

1.673  12 

4 

42.888  2 

2 

21.790  11 

3 

£64,678  13 

5 

4  002  19 

5 

1,204  1 

9 

358  6 

8 

484  3 

4 

407  17 

1 

57  1 

9 

645  19 

4 

549  3  10 

7.709  13 

2 

14.088  0 

1 

£21.797  13 

3 

By  Takings  at  Theatres  and  Profits  on  Refreshments 


£      s.    d. 
64.678  13    5 


£64.678  13    5 


By  Gross  Profits  on  Theatres 
,,  Transfer  Fees 


21.790  11     3 
7     2     0 


£21,797  13    3 


WALTER  SEYMOUR, 
J.  D.  DE-NAM-SMITH. 


J-  Directors. 

We  report  to  the  Shareholders  that  we  have  audited  the  above  Balance  Sheet  and  have  obtained  all  the  information  and  explanations  required. 
lei?1"  °"r  opiniou  such  Ba,ance  Sheet  is  properly  drawn  up  so  as  to  exhibit  a  true  and  correct  view  of  the  state  of  the  Company's  affairs  at  the  3rd  February, 
Jrnnn^iTl'i'f.*0  the  bef  ?f,°l'r,  info"nation  and  the  explanations  given  to  us,  and  as  shown  by  the  books  of  the  Company.     We  are  of   opinion  that  the  amount 
proposed  to  be  appropriated  tor  Leasehold  Redemption  is  ample  for  the  purjose.  ' 

6,  Old  Jewry",  E.C  BLAKEMORE  &  CO.,  Chartered  Accountants. 

22nd  March,  1912.  Au(/lUll. 


18 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,   1912. 


HEPWORTH. 

.    .  CERTAIN    WINNERS  .    . 

THE     DECEPTION. 


H 


«<*** 


Length    975    feet. 
Released  April  n. 

ALL    PRINTS    ON 

EASTMAN   STOCK 

ONLY. 


<m 


*$& 


Cast  includes  : — 
Mr.  Alec.  Worcester 
Miss  Chrissie  White 

AND 

MISS    GLADYS 
SYLVAN  I. 


*&j^ 


A   CHARMING  STORY  OF  REAL  HEART  INTEREST   AND  GREAT   DRAWING    POWER. 

THE    TRAITRESS    OF    PARTON'S    COURT. 


«$£» 


LENGTH 

1,050    feet. 

RELEASED 

.  .  April  25  .  . 


«&* 


«8S* 


SPLENDID 

QUALITY. 

MAGNIFICENT 

ACTING. 


*& 


A  smart,  thrilling  picture,  full  of  exciting  incidents  from  beginning  to  end.    Not  a  dull  moment. 


THE  HEPWORTH  MANUFACTURING  Co.,  Ltd.,  Cinematographers, 

2,  Denman  Street,  Piccadilly  Circus,  London,  W.        ISflSSSk      ml 


Telegrams 
"  Heptoic,  London. 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


19 


Hippodrome    Falkirk,  Ltd. — Capital 
Piatt  Bridge,  Broad-street  Place,  E.C. 


£3,000,    in    5s.   shares. 


MEMS. 


T 


HE  third  annual  meeting  of  Electric  Palaces,  Ltd.,  will 
take  place  at  the  Criterion  Restaurant  on  Wednesday, 
April  3rd,  at  11.30  a.m.  The  report  to  be  presented, 
which  appears  in  full  elsewhere  in  this  issue,  is  of  a 
most  gratifying  character.  The  profit,  after  deduc- 
tion of  expenses  and  interest  on  debentures,  &c, 
amounts  to  £14,088  0s.  Id.,  which,  added  to  the  balance  brought 
forward  from  last  year,  makes  a  total  of  £18,275  6s.  lid.  Not- 
withstanding such  a  gratifying  result,  the  directors  do  not  propose 
to  pay  on  this  occasion  a  greater  dividend  than  5  per  cent. 
They  feel  it  their  duty,  and  in  the  best  interests  of  the  Company, 
to  proceed  cautiously,  especially  in  view  of  the  present  unsettled 
state  of  public  affairs,  the  consequences  of  which  cannot  be 
foreseen.  Shareholders  who  paid  their  final  call  in  July,  1910 
(that  is,  about  eighteen  months  before  the  date  of  the  present 
accounts),  will,  on  payment  of  the  present  dividend,  have  received 
for  such  period  a  distribution  (including  the  dividend  of  10  per 
cent,  already  paid)  of  15  per  cent,  and  this,  too,  during  the  period 
of  construction  of  the  company's  palaces. 

The  Galway  Cinema  Theatre  is  tc  open  a  hall  in  Galway  with  a 
capacity  of  1,000.  The  capital  is  £1,000  in  £i  shares.  The 
programme   will   consist    of    pictures   and    variety    turns.  s 

to  open  on  Easter  Monday. 

The  usual  quarterly  dividend  of  ij  per  cent,  (being  at  the  rate 
of  6  per  cent,  per  annum)  has  been  declared  by  the  Eastman 
Kodak  Co.,  of  New  Jersey,  upon  the  outstanding  preferred  stock,  and 
of  2i  per  cent,  (being  at  the  rate  of  io  per  cent,  per  annum)  upon  the 
outstanding  common  stock,  an  extra  dividend  of  i\  per  cent,  upon 
the  common  stock. 


NEW  COMPANIES. 


New  Tredegar  Electric  Theatres,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in 
£1  shares.  Private  company.  55,  Duffryn  Terrace,  New 
Tredegar,  Mon. 

Aberfen  Picture  Palace  Co.,   Ltd. — Capital  £4,000,    in 
shares.     Bank  Chambers,  122,  High-street,  Myrther.  Tydvil, 

Picture  Palladiums,  Ltd. — Capital  £6,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company.     34,  Great  James-street,  Bedford  Row,  W.C. 


£1 


Zoechrome,  Ltd. — Capital  £15,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Cinephotos,      Ltd  — Capital     £500,     in    £1      shares. 


Private 


company.     150A,  Uxbridge  Road,  W. 

Eagle  Picturedromes,  Ltd  — Capital  £2,000,  in  /i  shares. 
Private  company, 

Lyceum  (Govan),  Ltd. — Capital  £18,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private 
company. 

Obelisk  Picture  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company.     Lewbham  Bridge,  Lewisham,  S.E. 

Greenock  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £1 
shares.     Private  company,     n,  Brougham-street,  Greenock. 

Chesterton  Cinematograph  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital,  £1,000,  in  £1 
shares.     Private  company, 

Premier  Picture  Palace  Ltd,  Liverpool. — Capital  £1,000,  in 
£1  shares.     2,  South  John-street,  Liverpool. 

Pinxton  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £1 
shares.     Private  company. 

Middleton  Picturedrome,  Ltd. — Capital  £3,000,  in  £1  shares. 
16,  Clegg-street,  Oldham. 

Crescent  Cinema  Theatre  Co.  (Hulme),  Ltd. — Capital 
£5,000,  in  £1  shares.     Private  company. 

Tyler  Apparatus  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £10,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company.     11,  Charing  Cross-road.,  W.C. 

Living  Picture  Targets,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  is.  shares. 
Private  company.     21,  Regent-street,  W. 

Hammersmith  Picture  Playhouse  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £300, 
in  £1  shares.  Private  company.  84  and  86,  King-street,  Ham- 
mersmith. 

Irish  Empire  Palaces,  Ltd. — Capital  £10,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company.     71,  Park-street,  Dundalk. 

Barnet  Cinema  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £4,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company. 

Blue  Halls,  Ltd. — Capital  £15,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private 
company.     239,  King-street,  Hammersmith,  W. 

Gnoll  Picture  &  Variety  Co.,  Ltd — Capital  £2,000,  in  £10 
shares.     Private  company.     Station  Parade  Offices,  Neath. 

Sunderland  Cinematograph  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £4,075,  in 
4,000  preference  shares  of  £  1  each  and  £3,000  deferred  shares  of 
6d.  each.     Private  company.     1,  Albemarle-street.  W. 

Mile  End  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £1,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private 
company.     Pavilion  Theatre,  Mile  End,  E. 

East  Hill  Picturedrome,  Ltd. — Capital  £5,000,  in  £1  shares. 
(500  deferred).     Private  company. 

Milnsbridge  Picture  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in  £1 
shares.  Private  company.  3,  Station-street,  Milnsbridge, 
Huddersfield. 

Pringle's  Picture  Palaces,  Ltd, — Capital  £15,000,  in  5,000 
first  preference  and  10,000  ordinary  shares  of  £1  each.  Private 
company. 


WILLIAMSONS 


STAR 


FILM 


SERVICE. 


PRICE 
RIGHT. 


QUALITY 
RIGHT. 


SERVICE 
RIGHT. 


The  Williamson  Kinematograph  Co.,  Ltd., 

28,  DENMARK  ST.,  CHARING  CROSS  ROAD, 
LONDON,  W.C. 


LC.C.PATTERN. 


SLIDING  STENCIL  CUT  FRONT. 


For  any  llluminant. 
Opal  or   Red    Glass. 

(As  shown.) 

Emergency  Exit   -  11/- 
Exit    ------  10/- 

Without  fancy  work. 
Emergency  Exit   -  10/- 

Exit    -----    9/- 

Any  other  signs  quoted  for. 
Discount  for  quantities. 


MANSELL,  Ltd.,  13a,  Cecil  Court, 


'Phone  8982  City. 


W.C. 


20  THE     CINEMA.  April,  1912. 


THE    FILM    RENTING    EXPERTS. 


FILMS 


LIMITED. 


Mead     Office : 


18  &  20  MANCHESTER  STREET,  LIVERPOOL. 


Telepbone  6782  Central. 
Telegrams  Films,  Liverpool. 


A.    T.    WRIGHT,    Managing    Director. 
Branches : 

23,     CECIL     COURT,  _¥    |"|WT\f|W  \*/    C*  Telephone  5783  Central. 

CHARING     CROSS     ROAD,  l^V^l^l  mJXJL ^1 j         W.X^.        Telegrams  Filmitted,  London. 

MIDLAND     CHAMBERS,"  _l\JFWr'AQTIF    dK    TY1MF  Telephone  2021  Central. 

17     WESTGATE     ROAD,  lid  ¥¥  V/AiJ  1  Lid"  V/ll"  1  I  llL.       Telegrams  Animated.  Newcastle-on  Tyne. 

8     WYNDHAM     ARCADE,  _P  ADHIPP  Telephone  3440  Cardiff. 

ST.     MARY'S     STREET,  V/lKl/lr  A     ■       Telegrams  Animated.  Cardiff. 

35     HIGH     STREET, f\IT  f     IT  A  ^^P  Telephone  3107. 


Telegrams   Films.  Belfast. 


16     DOLIER     STREET, 


UUDLllli  Telegrams  Films.  Dublin. 

The    PREMIER    and    EUREKA    FILM    SERVICE    are    par    excellence. 


Provincial   Agents   by   appointment  for  the 

ERNEMANN 


IMPERATOR. 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


21 


s3^' 


LIEUT.     DARING. 


MISS     IVY     MARTINEKi 


•B&C, 


m 


1111/ 


MISS     DOROTHY     FOSTER. 


MR.     J.     O'NEIL     FARRELL. 


The   People's   Popular   Players. 

No.    3— MEMBERS    OF    THE    B.    &  C.    No.    1    STOCK    COMPANY 


22 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


MEN     OF     THE     MOMENT 

IN   THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    WORLD. 

No.  III. — Mr.  Cecil  Hepworth,  of  the  Hepworth  Manufacturing  Company,  Limited. 


A  chat  with  the  Chief  of  one  of  the  leading  firms  in  the  Trade,  who  has  largely  helped  to  win  rightful 

recognition  for  the  All-British  film. 


HE  name  of  Hepworth  is  popular  in  the  Cinematograph 
world.  If  you  happen  to  number  the  energetic  and 
genial  chief  of  the  Denman  Street  firm  among  your 
friends  there  will  be  no  need  to  tell  you  why. 
Typically  English  in  appearance,  ideas,  and  methods, 
he  stands  for  all  that  is  best  in  the  English  trade,  and 
no  one  who  has  watched  his  stern  and  unceasing  fight  for  success — 
at  times  a  very  uphill  and  discouraging  one — can  begrudge  him 
his  victory  now  that  he  has  realised  his  ambition  to  make  the 
name  of  "  Hepwix  "  known,  respected,  and  admired  wherever 
cinema  pictures  are  shown.  And  it  is  no  exaggeration  to  say 
this  is  the  case,  for  it  is  invariably  the  signal  for  an  outburst  of 
applause  so  soon  as  the  name  is  flashed  upon  the  screen. 

What  Hard  Work  Will  Do. 

Mr.  Cecil  Hepworth  has  reason  to  feel  proud  of  the  fact  that 
the  "  Hepwix  "  trade-mark  is  equally  popular  with  the  Trade  and 
the  public.  This  enviable  state  of  affairs  has  been  brought 
about  as  the  result  of  real  hard  work,  and  is  the  outcome  of  a 
keen  perception  of  what  the  public — above  all,  the  English  public — 
wants  to  see  when  it  visits  a  picture  theatre.  There  was  a  time, 
not  so  very  long  ago,  when  English  pictures  were  more  or  less 
taboo  in  the  Trade,  when  exhibitors  preferred  to  include  French, 
German,  and  American — anything  but  English  films  in  their  pro- 
grammes. And  those  were  the  days  when  Mr.  Hepworth  needed 
all  his  courage  effectively  to  combat  this  almost  inexplicable  anti- 
pathy. All  credit  to  him  that  he  succeeded  where  others  had  failed. 
The  secret  of  his  success  lies  in  the  fact  that  he  realised  where  the 
English  film  fell  short  in  its  early  days,  and  immediately  set 
work  to  remedy  its  admitted  weaknesses. 

One  day  the  English-made  film  will  occupy  its  rightful  position 
in  the  English  Market,  and  when  that  day  comes — it  is  drawing 
nearer  every  day — British  manufacturers  will  have  Mr  Cecil 
Hepworth  very  largely  to  thank  for  gaining  for  their  goods  the 
recognition  which  is  undoubtedly  their  due. 

Meantime  it  is  interesting  to  learn  something  of  the  early  history 
of  one  who  has  done  so  much  for  the  English  film.  Young  as  he  is, 
Mr.  Hepworth  has  a  long  and  busy  career  behind  him.  His 
knowledge  of  what  the  public  wants  came  to  him  very  naturally, 
and  one  understands  why,  when  one  recalls  the  fact  that  he  is  the 
son  of  Mr.  T.  C.  Hepworth,  the  well-known  popular  science 
lecturer,  whose  name  will  always  be  associated  with  the  old 
Polytechnic.  In  his  early  days  he  was  his  father's  valued  assistant 
on  his  lecture  tours.  Then  he  joined  the  Warwick  Trading 
Company  (or,  as  it  was  then  styled,  Maguire  and  Baucus),  and  took, 
their  first  film  for  them.  Later  he  decided  to  start  out  for  him- 
self, and  the  story  of  how  the  little  house  at  Walton-on-Thames 
has  grown  into  the  big  and  wondrously-equipped  film  factory 
of  to-day  is  interesting  telling. 

The  Origin  of  "Hepworth's." 

"  Our  idea  at  the  outset  was  to  take  and  print  for  the  trade, 
and  our  films  were  a  sort  of  side-line  !  In  the  meanwhile  the 
series  of  films  was  growing  in  importance,  and  by  the  time  we 
had  reached  No.  100  we  had  scored  several  conspicuous  suc- 
cesses, notably  the  explosion  of  a  motor-car  and  a  topical  film 
illustrating  the  visit  of  Queen  Victoria  to  Dublin  in  1899." 

"  In  those  days  films  were  only  fifty  feet  long  — a  standard  set 
by  Lumiere — which  had  to  be  adhered  to  because  that  was  the 
only  length  in  which  one  could  buy  film  stock.  I  remember  we 
produced  a  film  of  200  feet  length — a  big  undertaking  in  those  days 
— and  we  thought  we  had  set  the  Thames  on  fire  !  In  the  course 
of  a  few  years  we  outgrew  the  little  house  at  Walton,  and  built  a 


factory  next  door,  and  ultimately  it  became  necessary  to  enlarge 
this  building,  and  the  business  was  turned  into  a  private 
company. 

"  We  had  three  or  four  very  successful  years,  paying  in  succes- 
sion 10,  20,  30  and  40  per  cent.  Then,  suddenly  excluded  from 
the  Amercan  market  by  the  operations  of  the  Trust,  which  hit  us 
very  hard,  added  to  the  invasion  of  the  English  market  at  the 
same  time  by  the  Americans,  we  had  two  or  three  very  lean 
years.  But  things  have  moved  since  then,  and  we  are  now  fight- 
ing the  American  on  his  own  ground  as  well  as  in  this  country,  and 
making  English  films  respected,  with  consequent  prosperity  to 
ourselves." 

Hepworth  Artists. 

"Our  artists?  We  were,  I  believe,  the  first  firm  to  engage 
theatrical  artists,  and  we  did  it  as  a  wild  speculation.  Our  first 
professionally  acted  film  was  'A  Leap  Year  Proposal,'  for  we  used 
to  rely  at  the  first  upon  casual  actors  and  actresses  whom  we  got 
down  from  London.  But  we  soon  realised  that  cinematography 
was  more  than  an  off-shoot  of  the  drama — in  fact,  that  it  was  an 
art  in  itself — that  it  had  limitationsand  possibilities  both  absolutely 
distinct  from  those  of  the  drama.  Then  we  recognised  that  it 
called  for  a  special  class  of  artistes  who  could  only  learn  the  new 
technique  of  their  art  by  constant  practice  and  training.  Only 
about  one  in  every  hundred  London  actors  and  actresses  had 
the  instinct  and  adaptability  necessary  for  this  kind  of  work. 
So  it  followed  as  a  consequence  that  we  began  to  make  con- 
tracts with  that   one  per  cent,  to  keep  it  always  at  our  call." 

A  New  Art. 

"  I  feel  that  cinematography  is  an  absolutely  new  art  that  must 
in  the  natural  course  of  events  give  rise  to  a  new  school  of  artistes. 
In  so  far  as  the  professional  side  is  concerned  they  will  not  be 
drawn  from  the  theatre.  They  will  be  drawn  from  the  same  class 
as  at  present  provides  the  theatre,  but  they  will  come  straight  to  the 
cinematograph  without  having  their  artistic  powers  uarped  and 
twisted  into  the  grooves  of  the  Drama." 

"  The  Cinema  "  and  the  Censor. 

"What  are  my  personal  views  in  regard  to  the  question  of  a 
Cinema  Censor  ?  First  let  me  say  that  I  read  what  your 
magazine  had  to  say  on  the  subject  last  month,  and  for  several 
reasons  I  cannot  agree  with  the  views  you  expressed.  A  film 
censorship  will  give  the  Trade  tar  greater  freedom  than  it  has 
ever  enjoyed  before.  For  instance,  at  the  present  time  we  are 
supposed  to  deal  in  our  films  with  human  nature,  but  for  fear  of 
one  prurient  mind,  or  one  over-officious  policeman,  we  dare  not  deal 
with  the  human  emotions  except  in  such  a  very  milk  and  watery 
fashion  that  they  become  unreal. 

"  We  want  a  little  more  liberty,  and  we  want  to  stop  other 
people's  license.  We  ought  to  have  as  much  liberty  as,  say,  Henrv 
Arthur  Jones,  if  we  are  to  put  living  drama  before  the  people.  If 
we  deal  with  all  these  things  in  a  fair,  proper,  and  artistic  manner, 
so  that  they  can  offend  no  one  but  a  maniac,  and  if  all  our  films 
receive  the  stamp  of  an  official  of  the  Censorship  Board,  we  shall 
no  longer  be  at  the  mercy  of  every  nasty-minded  crank  who  chooses 
to  play  the  part  of  common  informer." 

A    Consultative    Committee. 

"The  constitution  of  such  a  Board  of  Censorship?  Well,  our 
ideas  so  far  as  they  are  at  present  formulated  are  as  follows,  and 
we  generally  outlined  them  when  a  small  deputation  of  the  Trade 
— of  which  I  was  one— waited  upon  the  Home  Secretary  recently 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


23 


OUR     PORTRAIT     GALLERY. 


II 


HErWIX." 


24 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


with  a  view  to  discussing  the  question.  We  believe  that  it  will  be 
to  the  interest  of  the  Trade  to  appoint  a  fairly  large  Consultative 
Committee  of  intellectual  people,  whose  business  it  would  be  to 
work  on  the  rota  principle,  and  see  every  film  to  be  released. 
This  committee  would  be  presided  over  by  some  independent 
person  of  standing  and  he  would  be  called  in  to  decide  any 
differences  of  opinion  which  might  arise  from  time  to  time  He 
would  of  course  receive  a  big  retaining  fee,  and  his  decision 
would  be  final." 

Exotic  Productions. 

"  As  regards  the  general  question,  what  we  desire  is  that  the  Censor 
should  prohibit  absolutely  the  exhibition  of  those  exotic  pro- 
ductions which  are  being  mainly  imported  from    Germany.     The 


temptation  to  an  exhibitor  of  small  education  to  show  a  picture  of 
an  over-sensational  character  is  very  great  indeed.  It  puts  up  his 
receipts  immensely  (or  a  few  weeks,  and  he  does  not  realise  that  in 
gaining  a  few  thousand  additional  members  to  his  audience  for  a 
month  or  two,  he  is  losing  ten  times  as  many  respectable  people, 
and  losing  them  for  all  time.  Now  we  have  got  to  protect  the 
short-sighted  man  against  himself,  not  for  his  own  sake,  but  because 
we  realise  that  in  killing  his  own  show  he  is  also  killing  everyone 
else's  into  the  bargain." 

"  Now  tell  me,"  said  Mr. 
Hepworth,  "don't  you  think  our 
contention  a  reasonable  one  ?  "     /^^^, 

I  had  to  agree  that  it  was.  ^ 


1  siiuw  ne   is  aiso    Killing   everyc 


CINEMATOGRAPH     PROGRESS. 

By  OLIVER    HUDSON. 


WHO  invented  moving  pictures?  The  honour 
is  claimed  by  so  many  men  that  I  shall 
surely  give  offence  if  I  particularise.  Edison, 
Muybridge,  Marey,  Friese-Greene,  Birt  Acres, 
Lumiere,  and  Paul  each  "  discovered  "  some- 
thing fresh  concerning  the  strange  phenomena,  and 
although  Muybridge  appears  to  have  been  actually 
first  in  point  of  date,  his  invention  was  not  of  moving 
pictures  as  we  know  them  at  the  present  time.  But 
even  Muybridge  was  a  very  long  way  "  in  the  van," 
for  mention  of  moving  images  is  made  in  an  ancient 
manuscript  which  was  written  b.c  65,  and  Ptolemy's 
"Optics"  (a.d.  130)  contains  a  description  of  a  piece 
of  apparatus  for  demonstrating  the  persistence  of  vision, 
which  is  the  whole  germ  of  the  moving  picture  idea. 

The  Wheel  of  Life. 

Again,  did  not  Omar  Khayyam  (a.d.  iioo),  in  one  of 
his  glorious  quatrians,  have  in  his  mind  an  inkling  of  the 
greatest  invention  the  world  has  ever  seen  ?  This  is 
what  he  wrote  : 

"  For  in  and  out,  above,  about,  below, 
'Tis  nothing  but  a  Magic  Shadow-show, 
Play'd  in  a  Box  whose  Candle  is  the  Sun, 
Round  which  we  Phantom  Figures  come  and  go." 

Other  early  writers  who  referred  to  the  subject  are 
Alhazen,  the  great  Arabian  philospher  (a.d.  iioo), 
Leonardo  de  Vinci  (a.d.  1452)  and  Nollett  (1765),  but 
up  to  the  latter  date  nobody  had  applied  their  theories  to 
practice.  It  was  not,  in  fact,  until  the  middle  of  the 
nineteenth  century  that  any  substantial  advance  was  made. 
Then,  in  1860,  the  Zcetrope,  or  Wheel  of  Life,  was 
patented  by  Desvignes.  It  consisted  of  a  hollow 
cylinder  with  slots  or  apertures  at  equal  distances  around 
it,  and  on  the  inner  surface  were  painted  figures  of  men 
and  animals,  which  appeared  to  move  when  the  cylinder 
was  rotated.  It  should  be  noted,  however,  that  an 
exactly  similar  apparatus  was  described  in  the 
Philosophical  Magazine  in  1834 — no  less  than  twenty- 
six  years  earlier  than  Desvignes  took  out  his  patent. 
The  "  Wheel  of  Life  "  is  still  sold  in  toy  shops,  the 
price  being  about  a  shilling. 

To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  "  THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOYE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role. 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


Persistence  of   Vision. 

Before  proceeding  further  it  will  not,  I  think,  be  out 
of  place  to  briefly  describe  the  term  persistence  of 
vision,  without  which  the  moving  picture  would  be  an 
impossibility.  Let  me  say  at  once,  however,  that  I  have 
no  intention  of  entering  upon  a  learned  dissertation  in 
order  to  prove  that  there  is  such  a  phenomena  as  per- 
sistence of  vision.  My  readers  must  accept  Professor 
Tyndall  as  my  outer  dicta  and  permit  me  to  quote  his 
figures ;  then  will  I  endeavour  to  explain  how  the 
principle  applies  to  the  projection  of  moving  pictures 
upon  a  screen. 

Persistence  of  Vision  is  the  term  used  to  denote  the 
fact  that  the  retina  of  the  human  eye  retains  an 
impression  of  an  object  for  a  certain  period  after  such 
object  has  moved,  removed  or  disappeared.  For 
instance,  if  the  eye  be  fixed  upon  a  lighted  electric  lamp, 
an  impression  of  the  lamp  will  be  made  upon  the  retina 
of  the  eye  and  be  conveyed  from  thence  to  the  brain. 
Nov/,  if  the  light  be  switched  off,  the  impression  that  the 
light  is  still  there  will  be  retained  by  the  eye  and 
therefore  by  the  brain,  for  a  fractional  part  of  a  second 
after  the  light  has  disappeared.  If,  however,  the  light 
be  switched  on  and  off  with  sufficient  rapidity,  it  will 
give  the  impression  of  being  alight  continuously.  After 
an  exhaustive  series  of  experiments,  Professor  Tyndall 
came  to  the  conclusion  that  persistence  of  vision  varied 
in  different  persons  between  one-tenth  and  one-twenty- 
fourth  of  a  second,  the  average  being  one-sixteenth  of 
a  second. 

Continuous  Movement. 

Let  us  apply  the  facts  and  figures  given  above  to  the 
projection  of  cinematograph  pictures  upon  a  screen. 
A  piece  of  film  is  placed  in  correct  position  in  the 
projector,  and  the  handle  is  turned  at  such  a  speed  that 
the  pictures  are  thrown  upon  the  screen  at  the  rate  of 
sixteen  per  second.  What  we  appear  to  see  is  a  con- 
tinuous movement  of  the  figures  in  the  photographs. 
As  a  matter  of  fact  something  very  different  is  taking 
place.  In  reality,  each  picture  is  only  projected  upon 
the  screen  for  a  matter  of  one  thirty-second  of  a  second 
and  for  the  remaining  period  the  light  is  cut  off  from 
the  screen  by  means  of  a  shutter,  whilst  the  operating 
mechanism  pulls  the  succeeding  picture  into  position 
occupied   by  the  previous  one.      Yet   the  eye,  owing  to 

Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swing,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "  WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  4. 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


25 


the  persistence  of  its  retina,  conveys  to  the  brain  the 
impression  that  the  picture  is  on  the  screen  all  the  time, 
instead  of  only  a  portion  of  it  as  is  really  the  case.  It 
is  rather  fortunate  for  moving  pictures  that  there  is 
such  a  thing  as  persistence  of  vision,  otherwise  the 
pictures  would  he  jumpy! 

A  Notable  Step. 

But  to  return  to  our  subject.  The  next  notable  step 
in  the  march  of  progress  took  place  in  1868,  when 
Linnett  patented  his  "  Kineograph."  The  Kineograph 
was  in  the  form  of  a  book,  in  which  a  series  of  pictures 
was  printed  or  painted.  When  the  leaves  were  bent 
back  and  then  allowed  to  escape  from  under  the  thumb 
or  finger  the  rapid  succession  of  pictures  gave  the 
impression  of  continuous  movement  of  the  figures.  In 
its  turn  the  Kineograph  gave  way  to  a  series  of  devices 
which  were  known  as  Mutoscopes,  and  by  divers  other 
names.  The  general  principle  remained  the  same,  but 
instead  of  being  held  in  the  hand  and  released  from 
under  the  thumb,  the  pictures  were  arranged  around  a 
bobbin.  The  latter  was  fixed  in  position  inside  a 
wooden  case,  the  pictures  being  viewed  through  an  eye- 
piece or  lens  whilst  the  bobbin  was  rotated  by  hand  or 
by  mechanical  means. 

The  Year  1889. 

The  year  1889  will  go  down  to  history  as  the  one  in 
which  the  first  moving  pictures  were  projected  upon  a 
screen.  The  honour  belongs  to  Muybridge,  who  gave  a 
demonstration  of  his  "  Zoopraxiscope "  at  the  Royal 
Institution,  London,  during  that  year,  and  although  the 


pictures  were  printed  upon  glass  plates — not  films — every 
credit  is  due  to  him  as  being  the  first  man  to  project 
moving  pictures.  It  is  interesting  to  note,  by  the  way. 
that  although  most  of  Muybridge's  experimental  work 
was  done  in  California,  he  was  not,  as  is  commonly 
stated,  an  American.  He  was  born  and  died  at 
Kingston-on-Thames,  and  the  local  library  and  museum 
contains  a  large  number  of  his  original  photographic- 
studies  of  animal  motion,  to  which  subject  he  devoted 
practically  the  whole  of  his  life. 

A  natural  corollary  to  Muybridge's  successful  demon- 
strations was  the  filing  of  a  considerable  number  of 
applications  for  patents  for  all  sorts  of  projecting 
apparatus.  Friese-Greene  (1889)  was  one  of  the  first, 
and  he  can  undoubtedly  claim  premier  honours  as  the 
man  wrho — on  paper  at  any  rate — designed  the  first 
cinematograph  film  projector.  From  that  time  onwards, 
progress  was  rapid  and  continuous,  but  it  is  rather  sur- 
prising that  no  public  exhibition  of  a  complete  character 
was  given  until  1896,  although  in  the  previous  year  a 
private  demonstration  was  given  by  Mr.  Birt  Acres 
before  His  late  Majesty  King  Edward  VII.  (then  Prince 
of  Wales)  at  Marlborough  House. 

For  the  purpose  of  this  article  it  is  sufficient  to  have 
traced  the  history  of  moving  pictures  from  B.C.  65  to 
a.d.  1896.  Since  the  latter  year  films  have  been  im- 
proved (and  lengthened  !)  and  the  construction  of 
projectors  has  materially  altered,  but  the  general 
principles  remain  the  same.  We  are,  therefore,  fairly 
safe  in  leaving  the  progress  of  cinematography  to  take 
care  of  itself  for  another  month. 

(To  be  continued.) 


Signs  of   the  Times  .  .  . 


By  Harry  Lewy. 


MAY  as  well  begin,  and  tell 
Exactly  who  I  am, 


For  a  line  or  two  will  soon  show  you 
I'm  a  Moving:  Picture  Fan. 


When  I   feel  blue,  as  I   often  do, 

I   look  for  a  comedy  "  Indian   Head," 

Or  I   may,  perchance,  see  one  from   France 

That  bears  the  mark  of  the  "  Rooster "   Red. 

<*- 

Then  again  I  may,  the  very  same  day, 

Enjoy  a  film  with  the  Monogram  "  E," 

And  I  always  feel  that  I   can't  miss  a  reel 

That  follows  the  sign  of  the  "  Winged  V." 
■> 

A  tale  of  the  West  often  seen  at  its  best, 

By  the  orange  "  Diamond  S  "   I  can  tell, 

And  for  bushels  of  pleasure  (that  is,  in  a  measure), 
I'll  search  for  the  "  Liberty  Bell." 

When  things  go  bad,  and  I  feel  sad, 

The  "  Turning  Sun  "  soon  cheers  me ; 

And  I   must  say  this,   I   never  will  miss 

One  that  ends  with  the  Circled   "A.B." 

— M.P.  Story  Magazine. 


26 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


A    WELL  -  ENGINEERED    CAMPAIGN. 

MR.    DICKSON,    OF    THE    NEW    CENTURY    FILM    SERVICE,   TELLS    HOW    HE 

IS    BOOMING    A    BIG    FILM. 


EVERYONE  in  the  Cinema  world  has  either  seen  or 
heard  of  Selig's  great  historical  film,  "  Christopher 
Columbus,"  the  English  rights  of  which  have  been 
acquired  by  the  New  Cen'ury  Film  Service    Ltd. 

As  the  release  date  is  now  close  at  hand  (April  8th), 
interest  in  the  film  grows  apace,  and  in  order  to  learn 
further  details  of  the  special  publicity  campaign  upon  which  this 
enterprising  firm  has  embarked  to  make  known  the  exceptional 
character  of  the  great  "exclusive"  they  have  secured,  a'repre- 
sentative  of  The  Cinema  had  a  chat  with  Mr.  H.  Dickson, 
general  manager  of  the  New  Century  Film  Service,  Ltd.,  a 
few  dajs  ago  at  the  London  office  of  the  Company  in  Rupert 
Street,  on  the  occasion  of  one  of  his  frequent  flying  visits  t  >  the 
metropolis. 

A   Novel  Competition. 

"Special  arrangements  to  boom 
'  Christopher  Columbus  '  ?  We  have 
been  thinking  of  li'  tie  else  this  last 
lew  weeks,  and  I  think  I  can  say 
we     have     organised     as     complete 

campaign  to  ensure  the  success  of 
the  film  as  could  be  desired.  And 
the  person  who  stands  to  benefit  as 
much  as  anyone  by  these  arrange- 
ments is  the  showman. 

"How?  Well,  in  the  first  place 
we  have  completed  negotiations  with 
'  Tit  Bits  '  whereby  that  journal  is 
offering  /io  a  week  in  a  compstition 
for  the  best  postcard  received  each 
week  giving  an  answer  to  the 
following  question  : — 

Which  do  you  consider  the  best 
scene  in  'Christopher  Colum- 
bus,' and  why  ? 

"  In  order  tha>  the  showman  may 
derive  the  greatest  benefit  from  this 
competition,  it  is  arranged  that  every- 
one who  enters  for  the  prize  must  see 
the  film.  Answers  have  to  be  sent  in 
upon  official  postcards,  which  we  sup- 
ply to  each  exhibitor  who  books  the 
film.  In  addition  to  the  /io  prize 
every  week,  '  Tit  Bits  '  is  offering  /130 
in  prizes  for  the  five  best  postcards 
received  during  the  whole  time  the 
film  is  running.  We  anticipate  that 
no  less  than  one  million  entries  will 
be  made  for  the  competition,  and 
those  people  who  enter  should 
alone  more  than  pay  the  cost  of  the 
film  to  each  showman  who  books  it. 

Going    Strong. 

"How  is  the  booking  going?  Strong — couldn't  be  better,  in 
fact.  In  some  places  the  competition  to  secure  the  film  has  been 
extraordinarily  keen,  and  we  have  had  as  many  as  six  wires  in  a 
morning  from  one  town  asking  for  the  rights.  It  may  interest  you 
to  know  that  we  are  publishing  a  '  M-inual  of  Instruction  '  in  con- 
nection with  the  film.  We  quite  realise  that  to  get  the  fullest 
benefit  out  of  it  an  exhibitor  would  have  to  see  "Christopher 
Columbus "  several  times  in  order  to  arrange  the  various 
effects  he  can  use  in  conjunction  with  it.  But  as  it  is  only  possible 
for  him  to  see  it  once — sometimes  not  at  all — we  are  supplying  in 
this  '  Manual  '  full  directions  as  to  choral  and  stage  effects  and 
music,  and  hints  how  best  to  approach  the  local  Press,  the 
education  anthorities,  the  clergy,  school  masters,  and  others,  with 
a  view  to  interesting  them  in  the  film.  This  ought  to  be  one  of 
the  best  ways  of  booming  so  big  an  attraction,  and  no  doubt 
showmen  will  be  quick  to  act  upon  the  suggestions  thrown  out  in 
this  little  book." 

Mr.  Dickson's   Enthusiasm. 

Young  in  years  and  full  of  abounding  energy  and  enthusiasm, 


MR.    H.    DICKSON 


Mr.  Dickson  carries  one  with  him  as  he  talks  of  the  impression 
this  wonderful  film  is -going  to  make  upon  the  public.  It  is  a 
distinct  move  upwards;  it  marks  an  epoch  in  the  annals  of  the 
picture  theatre  ;  and  the  thousands  who  see  "  Christopher  Colum- 
bus "  in  this  country,  and  marvel  at  its  wonderful  realism,  its 
spectacular  grandeur,  an  i  its  exceptional  accuracy  as  regards 
historical  detail  will  have  to  thank  Mr.  Dickson,  and  the  company 
whos-;  interests  he  serves  so  well,  lor  an  intellectual  treat  which 
they  will  have  reason  to  long  remember. 

How  the  Exhibitor  is  Studied. 

"  One  thing  the  New  Century  Film  Service  recognised  early 
in  the  campaign  upon  which  they  had  embarked.  Exhibitors 
only  had    to    :ee    the    film    and    they    would    want    to    book  it. 

The     difficulty    was     to     get    them 
to    see    it  We     soon     overcome 

that,"  said  Mr.  Dickson,  with  a 
laugh.  "  If  the  mountain  cannot 
come  to  Mahomet,  Mahomet  must 
come  to  the  mountain.  So  we  decided 
to  take  the  film  on  tour,  visiting  the 
chief  centres,  most  getatable  by  the 
showman.  During  March  we  have 
visited  nine  of  the  leading  cities  in 
Great  Britain,  taking  with  us  a  com- 
pany of  founeen  people,  in  order 
that  the  exhibitors  whom  we  invited 
to  see  it  might  observe  how  best 
to  show  it  in  their  own  theatre. 
We  visited  London,  Cardiff, 
Birmingham,  Manchester,  Liver- 
pool, Leeds.  Newcastle,  Edin- 
burgh and  Glasgow,  and  we  took 
with  us  an  orchestra,  a  choir,  and  a 
ecturer.  The  singers,  by  the  way, 
were  selected  and  trained  by  Dr. 
Terry,  the  choirmaster  at  West- 
minster Cathedral. 

' '  The  object  of  the  tour  was  educa- 
tional, if  I  might  term  it  so,  in  order 
to  demonstrate  to  the  showman  what 
a  film  service,  which  has  its  custom- 
ers' interests  at  heart,  can  do  by  way 
of  issuing  a  film  in  such  a  manner 
that  the  exhibitor  who  shows  it  may 
reap  the  maximum  profit  from  his 
enterprise. 

The  Question  of  "  Exclusives." 

"Do  I  think  the  'exclusive'  will 
become  an  insiitu'ion  in  the 
business  ?  I  certainly  do.  It  is 
that  already.  But  I  consider  that  only  films  of  superlative 
merit  should  be  issued  on  the  '  exclusive '  principle.  No  show- 
man should,  under  any  circumstances,  book  an  '  exclusive  ' 
film  without  first  seeing  it.  It  is  part  of  our  policy  to  give 
our  customers  every  facility  in  this  direction.  We  have  a 
supply  of  '  exclusives'  arranged  for,  which  will  enable  us  to  make 
regular  releases  for  many  months  to  come,  and  some  of  the  subjects 
we  have  secured  will  be,  if  possible,  more  popular  and  more  profit- 
able even  than  '  Christopher  Columbus.' 

"  Have  I  been  long  in  the  business  ?  Well,  practically  the  whole 
of  my  business  career  worth  talking  about — but  that  does  not  extend 
over  such  a  very  long  period,  for  I'm  not  exactly  burdened  with 
years,  am  I,"  said  Mr.  Dickson  with  a  smile.  "I  learned  the 
technical  side  of  the  business  in  Paris  with  one  of  the  leading  film 
houses.  But  technique  did  not  appeal  to  me,  and  so  I  got  on  the 
business  end,  and  three  years  ago  joined  Mr.  S.  H.  Carter,  of 
Bradford,  one  of  the  few  large  exhibitors  in  this  country  at 
that  time,  and  established  for  him  the  New  Century  Film  Sevice. 
"  Yes,  we  have  certainly  gone  ahead  and  acquired  a  big  reputa- 
tion, especially  in  the  north  of  England,  but  I  hope  we  shall  go  a 
long  way  further  in  the  immediate  future." 


April,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


27 


THE    MOST   PERFECT 
BIOSCOPE    EXTANT. 

j*      J*     NEW      MODEL.      J*      jt 
ABSOLUTELY     FIREPROOF. 


Pictures    registered    while    the    machine    is    running    or    stationary. 
Optical  Centre  remaining  constant. 

Light  increased  50  per  cent    No  Supplementary  rollers  to  break  films. 
Mechanism  unequalled  in  workmanship  or  result  . 

I»E  RFECT. 
Catalogues    Post   Free. 


'  Grams : 
"Biojector,  London." 

'  Phone : 
Hop  1964. 

m  r.  r.  m 
BEARD, 

Manufacturers  of 
Scientific  Instruments 
Optical  Lanterns,  Cine- 
matographs.  Jets, 
Regulators,  Carriers, 
etc. 

10,TrafalgarRd., 

Old   Kent   Road, 

LONDON,   S.E. 


TOPICALS. 


\A/E  send  Operator  and  Camera  at 
•  "  shortest  notice.  Local  Topicals 
are  graat  business  pullers,  and  cost  very 
little  more  than  ordinary  films.  If  you 
would  like  to  take  your  o  -  n  Topicals, 
write  for  Camera  Catalogue,   post   free. 


THE  WILLIAMSON  KINEMATOGRAPH  CO.,  LTD., 

28,  Denmark  St.,  Charing  Cross  Road,  LONDON,  W.C. 


0 


mn 


PICTURE  PLAYS 

AND     — 

HOW   TO   WRITE   THEM. 

This  book  is  a  complete  course  of  instruction 

in  plot-writing,   and  shows    how    to 

turn  ideas  into  money. 

Price  5/=,  post  free. 

Popular  Edition   (unabridged),  2/9,  post  free. 


Write  for  Complete  List  of  Cinematograph  Books. 

THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    PRESS, 

16,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  London,  W.C. 


\ujj 


0 


COMING!    COMING!!       fife 

The  Film  that  nearly  Cost  a  Life. 

VIDE     PRESS— 

^o>  .  .  .  While  preparing  a  drama  for  cinematograph  pictures,  an  actor  known  as  Lieut.  Daring,  R.N. 
fell  over  a  cliff  90  feet  high  at  Brighton.  He  almost  miraculously  escaped  death  .  .  .  (Daily 
Chronicle,  March  2nd,  1912.) 

SEE    THIS    MARVELLOUSLY    REALISTIC    DRAMA    OF    NAVAL    DARING. 


ALREADY 
THE    TALK 
OF   BOTH 
TOWN 
AND 
PROVINCES. 


LIEUT.   DARING,   R.N., 

—    AND    — 

THE    SHIP'S   MASCOT. 


Released  April  28th,  1912. 


Length,  1,100  feet- 


BE   SURE 

YOU 

BOOK  IT, 

AND  IT  WILL 

FILL     YOUR 
HOUSE. 


SOLE     AGEJMTS 


M.  P.  SALES  AGENCY,  86,  WARDOUR  STREET,  and  Branches, 


28 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


Each  month  we  shall  publish  under 
this  heading  details  of  an  excep- 
tional bargain,  in  most  cases 
especially  appealing  to  newcomers 
in  the  business.       


AN    OPPORTUNITY    FOR    A    SMART    MAN    TO    ACQUIRE    THE 

PENGE    PICTUREDROME. 


PENCE    PICTUREDROME INTERIOR. 


N  London  and  ifs  immediate  neighbourhood  the  oppor- 
tunity seldom  occurs  to  acquire  a  picture  palace  worth 
anything  at  all  capable  of  exten-icn.  They  are 
snapped  up  by  investors  on  the  look-out  for  such 
properties  as  soon  as  they  come  on  the  market. 

A  Most  Desirable  Proposition. 

At    the    moment,    however,    such    an    opportunity  does  present 

itself  to  those 
who  are  smart 
enough  to  take 
ad  van 'age  of  it. 
The  Penge  Pic- 
turedrome,  a 
well  -  equipped 
theatre,  wnich 
is  capable  of 
considerable  en- 
largement, and 
in  the  hands  of 
the  right  man 
would  undoubt- 
edly show  an 
excellent  and  in- 
creasing turn- 
over, is  to  be 
acquired  on 
terms  which 
make  it  a  most 
desirable  proposition.  In  the  first  place  the  situation  of  the 
theatre  could  not  well  be  bettered.  It  is  within  one  minute's  walk 
of  Penge  L.B.  and  S.C.R.  Station,  and  little  more  than  one 
hundred  yards  from  one  of  the  most  frequented  entrances  to  the 
Crystal  Palace  grounds.  The  neighbourhood  is  a  flourishing  one  : 
it  is  thickly  populated,  and  numbers  of  people  are  attracted 
thither  by  events  of  public  importance  which  are  continually 
taking  place  at  the  Crystal  Palace.  Being  a  ccrner  site  h  has  t.to 
frontages  to  the  Beckenham  and  Oakfield  Roads,  which  is  always 
so  useful  from  an  advertising  point  of  view. 

A  Cosy  Little  Theatre. 

The  artistic  tower,  which  is  a  feature  of  the  frontage  of  this  cosy 
little  theatre,  at  once  catches  the  eye,  and  very  slight  and  inexpen- 
sive alterations  would  transform  the  entrance  into  a  most  imposing 
front.  The  theatre  is  nearly  80  ft.  long,  and  21  ft.  6  in.  wide,  and 
there  is  seating  accommodation  for  three  hundred  people — forty 
6d.,  sixty  ^d.,  and  two  hundred  3d.  tip-up  seats.  Velvet  arm- 
ctiairs  ate  used  thougbout,  and  the  building  is  lighted  by 
electricity.  The  size  of  the  screen  is  15  ft.  by  12  ft.,  and  the 
excellent  rake  of  1  he  hall  enables  everyone  to  get  an  unusually  clear 
and  uninterrupted  view  of  the  pictures.  There  is  a  system  of  gas 
radiators  for  heating  purposes,  and  five  exits  are  more  than 
sufficient  to  meet  all  official  requirements. 

A  Complete  Equipment. 

There  are  continuous  shows  from  6.30  till  11  p.m.  daily,  and 
matinees  on  Mondays  and  Wednesday  s;  but  there  should  be  a 
good  opening  for  additional  matinees  on  Thursdays  and  Saturdays. 
The  theatre  is  well  equipped.  In  the  operating  room  there  is  a 
motor-driven  Karam  projector — the  throw  being  about  60  ft. — and 
this  is  wired  for  two  lanterns.  There  is  also  a  transformer  for 
changing  alternating  to  direct  current.  In  addition  to  the  expensive 
turniture  and  fixtures,  there  is  a  D'Almaine  grand  piano,  and  one 
of  the  latest  "  Effects  "  machines,  used  as  an  accompaniment  to 
the  pictures,  and  capable  of  producing  all  kinds  ol  sounds  and 
effects,  which  are  so  necessary  and  desirable  in  adding  to  the 
enjoyment  of  the  pictures. 

A  Grand  Opportunity  for  Extension. 

An  important  point  to  remember  in  considering  the  possibility  of 


increasing  the  business  is  that  the  nearest  competitor  is  the  best 
part  of  a  mile  away.  The  whole  building  has  frontages  of  62  ft., 
and  a  depth  of  168  ft.,  and  can  easily  be  enlarged  to  seat  about  a 
thousand  people.  The  property  includes  a  residential  upper  part, 
stabling  (which  could  easily  be  let  off),  and  a  plot  of  ground  at  the 
rear  which  could  be  utilised  for  the  purpose  of  further  extensions 
to  the  theatre,  or  for  a  fun-land  or  shooting-gallery,  both  of  which 
go  so  well  together  with  a  cinema  theatre  in  the  suburbs.  This 
would  very  considerably  increase  the  income  and  profits.  In 
addition  there  is  here  an  opportunity  for  an  open-air  tea-garden 
and  dancing  green,  which,  with  a  little  music,  makes  a  strong 
popular  appeal.  If  the  latter  scheme  were  put  into  effect  there  is 
every  chance  of  its  proving  a  big  success,  as  the  large  number  of 
people  attracted  by  the  close  proximity  of  the  Palace  Grounds  is 
sure  to  increase  now  that  it  has  been  taken  over  as  a  public 
institutii  >n 

To  be  acquired  on  Reasonable  Terms. 

The  present  owner  has  fitted  the  theatre  with  everything  brand 
new  at  a  very  great  expense,  and  it  is  easy  to  realise  what  an  ex- 
ceptional thing  it  is  to  be  able  to  acquire  this  theatre  purely  at  a 
valuation  of  the  contents,  which  means  a  large  percentage  off  the 
net  cost.  To  a  new  man  entering  the  business  the  opportunity 
thus  presented  of  securing  so  desirable  a  property  is  a  really  very 
special  one.  The  theatre  C3n  be  acquired  on  the  following  un- 
usually favourable  terms,  viz.,  at  a  rental  of  /150  per  annum,  and 
the  contents  at  a  valuation,  or  the  valuable  freehold  can  be 
acquired  for  £3,700,  .£2,000  of  which  can  remain  on  mortgage  at 
4^  per  cent.  Considering  that  the  upper  part  is  worth  £35  per 
annum,  the  stabling  should  let  at  £15,  and  as  the  theatre  has  a 
low  rental  of  /150,  it  will  be  seen  from  these  figures  what  a 
bargain  is  obtainable.  They  work  out  as  follows:  Income: 
Theatre,  /150;  upper  part,  ^35;  stabling,  £15;  ground,  £32; 
and  No.  16,  Beckenham  Road,  let  at  £4-5  per  annum,  making 
a  total  of  ^277.  Outgoings:  ^2,000  on  mortgage  at  4^  per 
cent.,  £90;  profit  per  annum,  £187.  Therefore,  for  an  outlay  of 
£i,'joo,  a  per- 
petual income 
of  £187  can 
be  enjoyed, 
in  addition  to 
the  large  pro- 
fits to  be  de- 
rived from  the 
theatre  and 
open-air  shows, 
simply  by 
taking  over  the 
contents  at  a 
valuation  —  one 
of  the  fairest 
and  most  un- 
usual opportu- 
nities that  has 
ever  come  into 
the  mark  et . 
Further  partic- 
u  1  a  r  s  and 
orders  to  view 
are  to  be  ob- 
tain ed  from 
Messrs.  Harris 
and  G  i  1  1  o  w 
the  cinema'o- 
graph  theatre 
experts,  of  451A, 
Oxford  Street, 
W.,  who  are 
the  sole  agents 
for  the  pro- 
perty. 


PEXGE    PICTUREDROME — EXTERIOR. 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


29 


LONDON  *-  PROVINCIAL  THEATRES  d«  SITES 
TO  BE- LET- OR.- SOLD. 


Applicants  requiring  further  particulars  and  orders  to  view  any  of  the  properties  mentioned  in  the  subjoined  list  For   Scale  of   Charges   for   Advertisements 

are  reques.edt  j  quite  the  foli  3  numler  attached,  and  be  precise  in  the  information  they  seek.     Applicants  not  under  this  heading,  apply  to  The  Manager, 

finding  their  requirements  in  this  list  are  invited  to  forward  a  description  of  the  investment  they  are  seeking,  THE  CINEMA  NEWS  &  PROPERTY  GAZETTE, 

ami  particulars  of  anything  suitable  will  be  forwarde  1  from  time  to  time  without  charge  by  the  respective  agents.  LTD.,    21,    NORTH     AUDLEY     STREET,    W. 


selection  of  properties  from  the  rfgistfrs  of 

Messrs.    Harris   &  Gillow,   Cinematograph    Property   Experts, 

451a,   Oxford   Street,    London,    W. 


LONDON    THEATRES. 


LONDON,  E.— Frontage  20  ft.,  depth  80  ft.  Hold  about  30a.  Estab- 
lished Christmas,  1910.  A  going  concern  with  a  lease  of  8  years,  at  the 
low  inclusive  rent  of  £60  per  annum.     Price,  inclusive,  £425.     Fo.   518a 

I.ti.NOuN,  STW.— A  smart  little  Theatre  holding  about  300.  Price,  in- 
clusive of  everything,    £750.     Fo.    731b 

LONDON,  N. — A  snug  little  Theatre,  built  about  a  year  ago  at  a  cost  ot 
about  £3,500.  Lease  80  years.  Ground  Rent  £85  per  annum.  Holds  about 
650.      Price,    including   everything,    £2,250,    £1,000   of  which   can   remain. 

Fo.   68  iv 

LONDON  SUBURB,  N.W.— Public  Hall  built  about  4i  years  ago,  31  It. 
6  in.  frontage,  no  ft.  deep,  holding  about  500.  Price,  freehold,  inclusive 
of  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  £3,500  (a  part  might  remain).  First  floor  let  off 
at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  653b 

LONDON,  S.E.— Cinema  Theatre,  seating  400.  Established  over  two 
years.  Books  are  kept  and  open  to  inspection.  Average  takings  £21  per 
week.     Rent    £150  per  annum.     Lease  five  years.     Price    £350.     Well  fitted. 

Fo.  ,s86y 

LONDON,  N.— Fine  Music  Hall  seating  1.400 and  standing  room.  Price  £3,000, 
for  everything  as  it  stand  .  Rent  £925.  Profits  should  easily  reach  £5,000  per 
annum.  A  remarkable  opportunity  to  obtain  possession  and  a  proiitable  under- 
laking  for  a  small  figure.     Fo.  688b. 

LONDON,  W.  — Coliseum,  holding  about  700.  Established  June,  1910. 
Net  profits  £500  per  annum.  Price  £2,400,  inclusive.  Everything  of  the 
latest   and   best.     Rent    £300.     Long  lease.     Freehold  can   be  bought. 

Fo.   690 b 

I^.NjUON,  W.— Cinema  Palace,  holding  capacity  400.  Average  takings 
£$\  per  week.  fvxpenses  about  .£30.  Rent  £200.  Price  £2,000  (which  was 
the  cost  of  the  building  alone),  includes  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  2  pianos, 
organ.   Gaumont  machines,  &c.     A    bargain.     Fo.    89iy 

LONDON,  WF.ST-END.— One  of  the  highest  class  small  Theatres  in 
one  of  the  best  main  streets  in  the  West-end  of  London.  Although  only 
holding  about  200,  the  net  profit  is  over  £1,000  per  annum.  Price  for  the 
whole  place  as  a  going  concern,    ,£1,500.     A  bargain.     Fo.   992y 

LONDON,  S.W.— A  newly  built  Theatre,  costing  over  £5,000.  Capacity 
nearly  600.  Takings  last  month,  £220.  £2,000  cash  and  balance  on  mort- 
gage includes  going  concern  and  everything  of  the  best.  Long  lease. 
Ground   Rent   £250  per  annum.     Fo.  793b 


LONDON,  S.W.— Splendid  little  Theatre,  seating  525.  Takings  average 
weekly  £22-£ay  Lease  21  years  at  £90  per  annum.  Price  for  the  whoie 
going   concern,    £750.     Fo.  895b 

MIDDLESEX.— Theatre,  seating  300.  Rent  £125.  Price  £200.  Going 
concern.     Fo     123c 

LONDON.— Heart  of  the  West-end.  Theatre  holding  400,  and  making  a 
net  profit  of  £1,000  per  annum.  A  very  unusual  opportunity  to  acquire  a 
high-class   property.     Price  £1,000  cash,   balance  can  remain.     Fo.   140c 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  S.W.— Theatre  seating  250.  Profit  about  £150  per 
annum.  Rent  £52  on  long  lease.  Price  as  going  concern,  including 
everything,    £150.     Fo.    mc 

LONDON,  N.W.— Going  concern,  busy  spot,  making  a  net  profit  of  £500 
per  annum.  Seating  capacity  420,  or  if  desirous  of  enlarging  there  is  a 
piece  of  land  at  the  rear  75  ft.  long.  Established  2  years.  Rent  £350  per 
annum.     Lease  17  years.     Price  £1,500,   or  would  take  a  partner.     Fo.    i43c>' 

LONDON,  N. — Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  200  with  standing 
room  for  50,  or  could  be  enlarged  to  hold  another  100.  Established  3  years. 
Music  and  Dancing  licences.     Rent  £90  per  annum.      Price  £200.      Fo.    144c 

LONDON,  N.W.— Theatre  seating  600;  plush  tip-up  seats.  Established 
2  years.  Will  cost  about  £300  to  comply  with  L.C.C.  requirements.  Rent 
£150  per  annum.  Price  £200,  including  electric  piano,  organ,  &c.  A 
bargain.      Fo.    149c 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  S.E.— Theatre,  with  living  accommodation  over, 
seating  200,  and  making  a  net  profit  of  £300  per  annum,  to  be  let  for 
£60  per  annum.  Price  £325,  including  a  Gaumont  machine  and  two 
transformers,   &c.     Fo.    153c 

MIDDLh-SliX. — Theatre  seating  400,  taking  £30  per  week.  Established 
2'  years.  Rent  £50  per  annum.  Price  £500,  including  everything.  A 
bargain.      Fo.    i42cy 


LONDON    SITES. 


LONDON,  W. — Crowded  West-end  thoroughfare,  a  Site  capable  of  ac- 
commodating a  very  large  Cinematograph  Theatre  to  seat  about  2, coo, 
together  with  room  for  building  about  ten  Shops,  and  an  upper  part  com- 
prising Showrooms  and  Offices.  It  is  computed  that  £8,000  per  annum  net 
profit  will  be  made  from  the  rentals  to  be  derived  from  the  building,  and 
£8,000  net  profit  from  the   Cinematograph   Theatre.      Fo.   s6iy 

LONDON,  W.  — Main  thoroughfare  in  the  midst  of  Theatre  Land.  A 
Cinematograph  Theatre  capable  of  seating  about  1,500  can  be  built, 
together  with  shop  property,  offices,  &c.  A  net  profit  of  £12,000  per  annum 
should  easily  be  obtained.  Ground  Rent  £4,500  per  annum.  Estimated 
cost  of  building  £45,000.     Fo.  762b 


Gerrard 
5925. 


THE    CAR    MART 


Karbargins 
London. 


Has  a  Stock  of  over  100  New  and  Secondhand  Cars,  suitable  for  pleasure 
or  business  purposes.  'Phone  your  requirements. 


Special  Agents   for — 


METALLURGIQUE,     FIAT,    MERCEDES,     DAIMLER,     AUSTRO- 
DAIMLER,    NAPIER,   &c,    &c.     —  Lowest  London  Prices. 


297-299,    EUSTON    ROAD,    LONDON,    N.W. 


30 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,  1912. 


LONDON',  W  —  A  Building  Site  about  40  ft.  by  107  ft.,  at  present  com- 
prising two  shops  and  upper  parts  in  about  the  only  crowded  populous 
neighbourhood  in  London  where  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  does  not  at 
present  exist.  Ground  rent  £300  per  annum.  No  premium.  Really  an 
unusual    opportunity.      Fo.    757b 

LONDON,  W. — In  what  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  very  finest  positions 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  A  Building  Site,  00  ft.  by  100  ft.,  with  an 
entrance  from  the  main  road,  25  ft.  by  70  ft.,  which  would  form  a  Lounge 
and  Tea  Room.  All  necessary  exits  can  be  arranged,  and  a  net  profit  of 
about  .£7,000  a  year  should  easily  be  made  from  the  Theatre.  Ground 
Rent  £600  per  annum.  Premium  £3,000  payable  on  completion,  and  £4,500  in 
instalments  spread  over  a  period  of  seven  years.     Fo.  657b. 

1SLING  f  ON.  — Near  the  "Angel,"  having  a  frontage  of  auout  40  tt.  and  a 
depth  of  130  ft.,  offering  a  grand  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  handsome 
Theatre  in  which  a  very  large  and  remunerative  business  could  be  done.  Part 
freehold  and  part  leasehold  for  70  years,  the  Ground  Rent  of  which  is  £200  per 
annum.     Price  £7,000.      Fo.  613a. 

STREATHAM.— Main  road,  very  fine  Site  with  a  frontage  of  162  ft.  and 
a  return  frontage  of  232  ft.  Premises  are  already  built  upon  the  property 
and  are  let  to  one  of  the  chief  Banks  at  £250  per  annum,  who  can  be  re- 
tained. A  Cinematograph  Theatre  could  be  arranged  on  the  other  portion 
of  the  land,  and,  being  in  such  a  populous  neighbourhood,  a  very  large 
business  can  be  done.  Will  be  let  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  .£400  per  annum,  or 
freehold    £10,200.      Fo.    505a 

CAMDEN  TOWN.— An  excellent  Building  Site  with  about  40  ft.  frontage 
can  be  had  in  the  High-street,  on  lease  for  90  years,  at  a  Ground  rent  of 
£130  per  annum.     Premium    £1,200.     Fo.  8i3y 

HACKNEY. — In  a  very  fine  position  at  the  junction  of  two  main  streets, 
an  excellent  Site  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  over  1,000.  Ground 
Rent   £250.  per  annum,    lease  99  years.     Fo.  814a 

KING'S  CROSS.— In  the  main  road,  a  good  Site  with  a  frontage  ot 
32  ft.,  widening  to  70  ft.,  with  a  depth  of  127  ft.  Ground  Rent  £380  per 
annum.     Fo.    614V 

STRATFORD,  High-street.— An  excellent  Site  In  this  populous 
neighbourhood,  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  1,500.  Lease  expires 
1063.     Ground    Rent    £70  per    annum.     Price  £2,000.     Fo.    510b 

BOROUGH  HIGH-STREET.— A  Freehold  Site,  capable  of  erecting  a 
Theatre  to  seat  about  1,000.  Frontage  60  ft.,  depth  no  ft.  Price  £3,250. 
Extra    land  at   the   side  can   be  added  totalling  8,000  square   ft.     Fo.    721b 

HAMPSTEAD,  High-street.— A  Site,  50  ft.  by  .50  ft.,  to  be  let,  in  the 
main   street.     Ground    Rent  £150  per   annum.     Fo.    625b 

CLAPHAM  JUNCTION.— In  the  main  street.  Fine  Site,  50  ft.  by 
100  ft.     Price,   freehold,  £3,000,  might  be  let   on  a   building  lease.     Fo.  jiasy 

CLAPHAM,  High-street. — A  noble  corner  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre  or 
Music  Hall,  being  over  one  acre  in  extent.  Buildings  are  now  erected  on 
it,  portion  of  which  could  be  utilised  or  let  off.  Ground  Rent  £1,400. 
Lease  99  years.     The  freehold  will   be  sold.     Fo.    530b 

BRIXTON. — In  the  best  position.  An  exceedingly  good  Site,  suitable  for 
a  Theatre  seating  about  1,500.  Ground  Rent  .£450  per  annum.  Lease  60 
years.     Fo.   731b 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  N.— A  fine  property  suitable  for  Theatre,  capable 
of  seating  about  1,000,  with  room  to  build  two  shops  in  addition.  Ground 
Rent  £150.     Lease  99  years.     Fo.   645b 

EUSTON-RO^D.  —  In  the  best  pcsition,  fine  property  capable  of  erecting 
a  Theatre  with  alterations  only,  existing  property  being  easily  adapted.  A 
Theatre  can  be  arranged  capable  of  seating  about  750.  Rent  £750  per 
annum.     Fo.    546b ^ 

HOLLOWAY-ROAD.— In  the  very  best  position,  a  fine  corner  bite, 
30  ft.  by  93  ft.,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  seating  about  650.  A 
very  large  business   can  be  done  in  this  important    position.     Rent  £600. 

Fo.    8jSb 

BRENTFORD,  High-road.— A  fine  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre,  frontage 
80  ft.,    depth   250  ft.      Price,   freehold   £2,500,      Fo.    649b 

ACTON.— In  the  main  street,  a  very  excellent  Site,  frontage  42  ft.  6  in., 
depth    100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000.     Fo.  650b 

LONDON,  N.W.— In  a  very  fine  position  for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre. 
A  Site  capable  of  a  building  to  seat  800  to  1,000,  and  having  two  very  ex- 
cellent frontages  to  the  most  important  roads  in  the  district.  Ground  Rent 
£190.  Premium  £1,600.  A  higher  ground  rent  without  a  premium  might 
be  arranged.     Fo.   563Tb 

WESTMINSTER.— In  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Houses  of  Parliament. 
A  grand  Site  next  door  to  important  banking  premises,  and  having  a 
frontage  of  104  ft.,  comprising  four  separate  properties  which  can  be 
adapted  for  the  purpose  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre,  or  a  new  builumg 
could  be  erected.  This  being  situated  in  a  very  thickly  populated  district 
offers  an  unusually  good  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  good  going  con- 
cern. Fo.  665  b 

LONDON,  N.  —  Site  about  74  ft.  by  85  ft.  in  populous  district.  Price  tor 
the  freehold,    £2,000,    or  might   be  let  on  building   lease.     Fo.   568b 

NOTTING  HILL  GATE.— Site  35  ft.  by  80  ft.  Lease  7,  14,  or  21  years. 
Ground  Rent   £350.     Close  to  Notting  Hill   Gate  Station.     Fo.   576y 

BROMLEY.— Site  in  an  excellent  position,  15  ft.  3  in.  by  106  ft.  Price 
£2,500. Fo.   676b 

WANDSWORTH. — Ex-cellent  Building  Site  in  a  very  fine  position,  lhe 
freehold  can  be  obtained  for  £4,5°°.   tn~  major  part  of  which  can  remain. 

Fo.   870b 

SOUTH  NORWOOD. — Workshop,  25  ft.  by  10c  ft.,  suitable  for  conver- 
sion  into  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  56  years.  Ground  Rent  £4  10s. 
Low  price.     Would  be  let   for  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  678b 


TOTTENHAM.— Site,    25    ft.   6   in.   by   131    ft. 
£1,650.     A   very  fine  position.     Fo.  677y 


Lease  93  years.       Price 


WEST  HAM.— Site  having  an  area  of  about  10,100  square  ft.  Lease  80 
years.  Ground  Rent  £65  per  annum.  Price,  freehold,  £1,000.  Part  let 
off  for  £40  per  annum,     to.   777b 

B  K  FN  1  FORD. —Site,   18  it.   by  259  ft.     Price,   treehold,   £2,500.     Fo.    683V 

MORI  LAKE.  — Freehold  Site  in  a  very  good  position  where  a  large 
business   could  be  done.     Price  £5,500.     Fb.   5S2y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.-Site,  34  ft.  by  75  ft.  Lease  about  18  years. 
Rent  £180.     Price   £1,500.     Fo.  88oy 

PLAISTOW. — Site,  50  yards  from  station,  36  ft.  by  90  ft.  Good  position 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  99  years.  Ground  Rent  £75  per 
annum,  or  price,    freehold,   £1,500,    part  on    mortgage.     Fo.   780b 

PADDING  f  ON. — A  very  fine  Site  of  16,000  ft.  At  present  occupied  by  an 
excellent  building  which  could  easily  be  converted.  Will  be  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £700  a  year  with  a  premium,   or  the  freehold  would  be  sold. 

Fo.    7-  iv 

BOW,  E. — In  the  main  road,  trams  pass  the  door.  A  very  good  Site  in 
the  busiest  spot,  42  ft.  frontage  by  112  ft.  6  in.  deep.  Price,  £600. 
A  successful  Theatre  could  be  built  for  about  £2,000,  and  a  mortgage 
could  be  arranged  for  £1,500.  There  is  only  one  other  small  Theatre 
in  the   neighbourhood,    thus  offering   an   excellent  opportunity.     Fo.   673b 

WANDSWOR  rH-ROAD.— Two  good  Shops,  easily  adaptable  for 
Theatre,  36  ft.  by  64  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £900.     Fo.  995V 

BETHNAL  GREEN.— Building  Site  in  main  street.  Plans  passed  for 
Theatre  to  seat  580  and  two  Shops.  61  ft.  by  95  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £4,500, 
or  might  be  let  at  a  ground  rent  of  £250  per  annum.     Fo.  796b 

CRICKLEWOOD.— Good  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  87  ft.  by  90  tt. 
Will  be  let  on  building  lease  at  £90  per  annum,  or  freehold  would  be  sold. 
Fo.   896y 

TOTTENHAM.— Freehold  premises,  28  by  112  ft.  Ground  Rent  £70! 
Price  for  the   lease,   £1,000.     Fo.    898b 

GOLDER'S  GREEN. — Prominent  position,  Site  40  ft.  by  100  ft.  Ground 
Rent   of   £70   per  annum   on    long  building  lease.     Fo.   998y 

EALING. — Site  in  very  good  position,  dose  to  the  railway  station.  80  ft. 
by  200  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800.     Fo.  799b 

EALING.  —  Site  in  good  position,  28  ft.  by  90  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £250, 
or  ground    rent   of  £10  per  annum.     Fo.   looey 

PALMER'S  GREEN.— Corner  Site  on  the  main  tram  route.  Ground 
Rent  12s.  per  foot.     Fo.    101c 

CHILD'S  HILL. — Good  Site  in  a  first-class  position,  60  ft.  by  100  tt. 
Price  16s.   per   foot'.     Fo.    ioicy 

HOUNSLOW. — Main  street.  Site  64  ft.  by  175  ft.  Good  opening  here 
for  a   Theatre.     Price  £1.200  for  the  freehold.     Fo.   102c 

HAMMERSMI  i  H.— Corner  Site,  depth  243  ft.  Freehold  will  be  sold. 
Fo.    io^y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.— Good  position.  Building  Site,  185  ft.  by  225  It. 
Freehold  to  be   sold  ;    major    portion   can   remain   on   mortgage.     Fo.    103c 

ACTON. — Site,  50  ft.  \>y  120  ft.  Freehold  £1,600,  or  a  ground  rent  of 
£80  per  annum.     Fo.   107c 

CROYDON. — Site,  close  to  High-street.  Low  ground  rent  on  building 
lease.     Fo.    107CV 

HARROW-ROAD.— Site,  splendid  position,  36  ft.  by  136  ft.  Will  be  let 
on  building  lease  at  £140  per  annum.     Fo.    108c 

WESTMINSTER.— Site  in  good  position,  22  ft.  by  53  ft.  Price,  free- 
hold,  £850,  or  would  be  let  at  £50  per  annum.     Fo.  io8cy 

FINSBURW  E.C.— Site,  9,650  square  ft.  Building  lease  99  years. 
Ground  Rent  £300  per  annum.     48  ft.  by  235  ft.     Fo.    105c 

WALHTmGREIN.-  Freehold  Site,  72  ft.  by  106  ft.  Excellent  position. 
Freehold  for   sale.     Fo.   iQjCy 

BETHNAL  GREEN.— Site  in  main  street,  61  ft.  by  96  ft.  Price  £4.500 
freehold.     Ground  Rent  £250.     Will  seat  about  580.     Fo.   i:2cy 

ACTON.— Splendid  corner  Site,  really  a  valuable  position,  leading  to  a 
larger  Site  in  the  rear,  100  ft.  deep  with  frontage  of  171  ft.  Rent  of  the 
corner  premises  is  £130  per  annum.  Freehold  of  site  at  rear  £1,500. 
Quite  an  unusual  opportunity.     Fo.    113c 

CHELSEA.— Site  with  two  frontages,  39  ft.  by  66  ft.  Price,  freehold, 
£700.     On  building  lease,  £35  per  annum.     Fo.    i22cy 

CLAPTON.— House  and  Stabling,  26  ft.  by  100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800. 

Fo.    113CV 

EALING.— Site,  60  ft.  by  120  ft.  Ground  Rent  £50.  Premium  £150. 
Long  lease.     Fo.  t27C 

WESTBOURNE  GROVE.— Premises  easily  adaptable,  70  ft.  frontage  by 
40  ft.   deep,  with  back   entrance.     Rent  £600  per  annum.     Fo.    i24Cy 

HARROW-ROAD.— Premises  with  an  area  of  26,433  ft-  Frice  £8,000. 
Ground  Rent  £232,  or  would  be  let  at  £750  per  annum.     Lease  46  years. 

Fo.  138CV 

LONDON,  N.W. — A  really  good  Site,  situate  in  a  main  road,  having  a 
frontage  of  120  ft.  and  depth  of  160  ft.     Rent    £600.     Fo.   150CV 

LONDON,  N.W. —An  excellent  Site  in  a  busy  spot.  Frontage  171  ft., 
depth   126  ft.     Rent  £750-     Price  £15,000.     Fo.    151c 

LONDON,  SUBURB,  S.W.— A  fine  corner  Site  in  a  good  position.  Area 
3,250  square  feet.  Price,  freehold,  £1,250,  or  would  let  on  a  building  lease 
at  £65  per  annum.     Fo.    139CV 

ACTON.— Corner  Site.  Frontage  152  ft.,  and  a  return  frontage  of  102  ft. 
Admirably   adapted  for  a   Cinematograph   Theatre.      Price,    freehold,   £1,300. 

Fo.    i44cy 


W*    LEACH,    high-class  IRcstorations,    Decorating 

DRAWINGS    AND   ESTIMATES    SUBMITTED    FREE. 

57,  New  Compton  Street,  Charing  Cross,  W. 


Phone  : 
Gerrard  4986. 


&   Sanitary   Work, 


Works : 
Star  Court,  Soho  Square,  W. 


April,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


31 


LONDON,  S.W.— Splendid  Site  in  a  good  main  position.  Everything  is 
ready  for  immediate  possession  ;  plans  have  been  passed  by  the  L.C.C., 
and  the  necessary  licences  obtained.  Would  accommodate  a  theatre 
capable  of  holding  about  700.  Area  6,000  square  feet.  Ground  rent  ,6100 
per  annum.  Premium  £500,  open  to  offer.  Lease  21  years,  could  be 
extended.     Fo.    142c 

LONDON,  WEST-END.— Site  in  one  of  the  busmest  thoroughfares  in 
the  West-End.     Price   £510,   leasehold.      Fo.    146CV 

LONDON,  S.W. — An  excellent  corner  Site  in  a  good  position,  60  ft.  by 
56  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000,  or  on  building  lease.     Fo.    147c 

LONDON,  S.W. — Site,  having  an  area  of  13,000  square  feet  for  Sale, 
freehold.  Price  £5,000,  or  would  let  on  building  lease  at  £250  per  annum. 
Fo.    149c 

LONDON,  WeST-END. — Handsome  Hall  situate  in  a  very  busy  spot, 
easily  converted.      Low  rent.      Fo.    I5icy 

GOLDeR's  GREEN. — Fine  corner  Site,  having  a  frontage  of  67  ft., 
and  a  return  frontage  of  105  ft.  Splendid  position.  Ground  rent  £100. 
Premium    £1,000.      Fo.    152c 

LONDON,  N.E. — Corner  Site  in  a  fine  position.  Area  30,700  square  feet. 
Excellent  opportunity.    Price,   freehold,   £4,800.     Fo.    152CV 

SUSSEX. — Skating  Rink  in  a  select  seaside  resort.  Was  erected  at  a 
cost  of  £5,000.  Easily  converted  if  necessary.  Rent  £250  per  annum.  Price 
for  the  building,  &c,  £1,500.     Lease  7  years.     A  bargain.     Fo.   141c 

KENT. — site  in  a  very  well-known  seaside  town.  A  small  theatre  has 
been  erected  on  the  site,  but  it  is  too  small.  Plans  are  prepared  and 
passed  by  the  Council  for  a  new  theatre  to  seat  600  ;  with  the  present  outfit 
it  would  cost  about  £2,000  to  rebuild  and  equip.  Trams  pass  the  door. 
Ground  rent  £50,  rising  to  £60.  Lease  20  years,  with  option  to  purchase. 
Fine    opportunity.      Fo.    14107 


Bl'CKS. — Skating    Rink    in    a    good    position    in    a    large    town,    48    ft.    by 
51    ft.      Price,    freehold,    £1,800.      Fo.    144c. 


LANCASHIRE. — Site,  splendid  position  in  large  town.     Area  7,200  square 
feet.     Ground   rent  just  over  £900  per  annum.     Lease  28  years.     Fo.    I45cy 


lUKKhHIRr..- Site,  situate  in  the  centre  of  a  large  town.  Frontage 
50  ft.,  and  depth  77  ft.  Rent  £150  per  annum.  Lease  15  years.  Price 
£1,800.     Fo.    147CV 


NORFOLK. — Fine  Site,  situate  in  the  midst  of  the  working  classes  and 
in  the  principal  street  of  the  town.  Area  16,700  square  feet.  Nearest 
theatre    ij   mile   away.      Splendid   opportunity.      Fo.    I48cy 

HOME   COUNTIES. 


BEDFORDSHIRE.— A  well-built  property,  heretofore  used  as  a  K.ink, 
suitable  for  conversion  to  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  with  small  expense. 
Large  seating  capacity.  Population  50,000.  Rent  £300  per  annum,  or  the 
freehold  will  be   sold  for  £4,500.     Fo.   626b 


BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,  High  Wycombe.— A  Building  Site  at  present 
comprising  four  cottages  in  the  main  street,  with  a  large  factory  in  the 
rear,  having  a  frontage  to  another  street  ;  the  whole  of  the  property  is  now 
let  and  producing  about  £125  per  annum.  Has  a  frontage  of  50  ft.  and  a 
depth  of  150  ft.      Rent  £104  per  annum.      Premium  £850.     Fo.  438b 


Sl'RREY. — Cinematograph  Theatre  in  the  High-street,  80  ft.  by  85  It., 
with  seating  capacity  at  present  of  only  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £200.  Rent 
£110  per  annum.      Lease  5   years,  with   option.      Fo.    153CV 


BERKSHIRE.— Important  town,  a  good  Theatre,  seating  about  700. 
Lease  19  years.  Rent  £300  per  annum.  A  sound  concern  able  to  do  a 
very  large   business.     Price,  including  electric  light  plant,  £1,500.     Fo.    651b 


BERKSHIRE. — Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  350.  Rent  £260  per 
annum.  Lease  14  years,  which  includes  a  large  Hall  at  the  back,  let  at 
£6   per  week.     Price,    inclusive,   £650.      Fo.    752b 


SURREY,  Croydon.— A  gooo.  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  just  a  few 
doors  from  the  best  and  busiest  shopping  part,  48  ft.  by  170  ft.  A  remark- 
ably good  opportunity  to  get  one  of  the  best  positions  in  this  important 
town.  Price,  freehold,  £3,000,  or  £2,000  for  the  999  years'  lease,  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50  per  annum.     Might  be  let  without  a  premium.     Fo.  76sy 


HERTS.— In  a  first-class  town.  Population  50,000.  An  excellent  Site  in 
the  very  best  position,  close  to  the  junction  of  four  main  roads,  43  it. 
wide  by  100  ft.  deep.  A  Theatre  can  be  erected  for  about  £1,500,  and 
there  is  no  doubt  that  a  very  steady  and  satisfactory  business  could  be 
done.     Ground   Rent  £150  (no  premium).     Fo.   566b 


SURREY.  — With  a  shopping  population  of  between  40,000  and  45,000. 
Very  excellent  Hall,  seating  about  800,  with  stage  and  every  convenience 
for  running  a  Cinematograph  Theatte  with  Turns  if  desired.  Completely 
fitted  with  seating  and  everytning  necessary.  The  property  includes  a  resi- 
dence and  a  handsome  building  which  could  be  utilised  as  a  Club,  Dancing 
Academy,  or  any  other  business  where  a  handsome  building  is  required 
with  a  number  of  fine  rooms.  Replete  with  every  convenience,  including 
large  tennis  lawn.    Price  £8,000.    Might  be  let  at  £500  per  annum.     Fo.  664V 


HERTS,  St.  Albans. — Freehold  Land  anj  Buildings  in  the  heart  of  the 
City,  50  ft.  frontage  by  300  ft.  deep,  comprising  two  large  dwelling  houses 
with  shops  and  stores.     Gardens  and  yards  at  rear.     Price  £2,500.     Fo.  766y 


KENT.— Very  good  Hall,  seating  ^500,  fitted  tip-up  seats,  &c.  Estab- 
lished three  years.  Takings  average  £50  per  week.  Lease  14  years.  Rent 
£275   per  annum.     Low  price  to   include  everything.     Fo.  781b 


KENT. — A  good  Hall  seating  300,  established  1909.  Fitted  tip-up  seats. 
Takings  £35  per  week.  Rent  £200  per  annum.  Price  £1,250,  to  include 
everything.     Fo.    88iy 

L KOI  DON. —  Corner  bite,  37  It.  6  in.  by  87  ft.  10  in.  ±"nce,  freeholu, 
£1,000.     No  theatres  in  the  vicinity.     A  good  spot  for  business.     Fo.   685y 

HERTS.— Large  town.  Theatre  seating  500.  Takings  £50  per  week. 
Net  profit  nearly  £25  per  week.  Price  for  the  whole,  including  the  build- 
ing.  £3.000-     Fo.  897b 

HERiS. — Large  town.  Picture  Theatre,  seating  750.  Price  £4,500,  half 
of  which  can  remain.     Rent  £300.     A  going  concern,,  making  good  profits. 

Fo.    114CV 

KEN  i. — A  fine  Building,  having  frontage  of  62  ft.  and  a  depth  of 
168  ft.  At  present  seating  270  ;  could  be  enlarged  to  1,000.  The  Building 
includes  a  residential  upper  part,  and  also  stabling,  which  could  easily  be 
let  off.  Price  £3,700,  £2,000  of  which  can  remain  on  mortgage,  or  Theatre 
would  be  let  at  £150  per  annum  and  contents  at  a  valuation.     Fo.   139c 

OXON. — A  going  concern.  Seating  1,000.  No  opposition  whatever.  Low 
inclusive    price.      Fo.    140c 


MIDLANDS. 


DERBYSHIRE.— Skating  Rink,  frontage  48  ft.,  depth  128  ft.,  seating 
capacity   about    1,000.     Established   November,    1909.     Low  price.     Fo.   639b 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.— Large  mining  district.  Iron  and  timber  built 
Theatre,  fitted  tip-up  seats.  Prices  6d.,  9d.,  is  ,  and  is.  6d.  Electric  light, 
own  plant.  Seat  1,000.  Built  about  six  years  ago  but  not  yet  opened  as 
Picture  Theatre.  Unusual  opportunity.  Price  £1,200  as  it  stands,  in- 
cluding everything.  Might  be  'et  for  £350  per  annum.  Freehold  can  be 
acquired.     Fo.    99oy 

WARWICKSHIRE.— A  substantially  built  Theatre,  in  a  prominent  posi- 
tion, having  a  frontage  of  164  ft.  Includes  two  lock-up  shops.  Part  let 
off  at  £100  per  annum.  Fitted  with  every  convenience.  Lease  87  years. 
Ground  Rent  £93  per  annum.  Price  £11,000,  half  of  which  can  remain  on 
mortgage.  The  profits  are  estimated  at  between  £2,500  and  £3,000  pel 
annum.     There  is  no  other  hall  within   two  miles.     Fo.    775y 

NORTHANTS  —  Picture  Palace,  90  ft.  by  97  ft.,  seating  750.  Large 
town  with  100,000  population.  Average  takings  £60  to  £100  per  week. 
Price  for  freehold,  including  the  Theatre  as  a  going  concern,  £4,500.  A 
very  good   investment.     Fo.   997y 

DERBY. — Corner  Site,  17,000  square  ft.  Freehold  £2,500.  Three  houses 
on  site  bring  in  £111  per  annum.     Fo.  ii7cy 

NOTTINGHAM. — Site  over  9,000  square  ft.  Price  £12,000,  or  ground 
rent  £600  per    annum.     Fo.    125c 

DERBY.  — Corner  Site,  splendid  position,  90  ft.  by  173  ft.  Licences 
already  obtained.     Ground  Rent  £300.     Lease  99  years.     Premium  £3,000. 

Fo.  135c 

NORTH    OF    ENGLAND. 

LANCASHIRE.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  frontage  38  ft.,  depth  68  ft., 
seating  about  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £1,000,  including  generating  plant. 
Opened  January,  1911.     Fo.  502a 

LANCASHIRE. — The  Market  Hall  in  an  important  town,  seating  about 
1,000.  At  present  taking  nearly  £40  per  week.  An  old-established  going 
concern.  Rent  £525  per  annum.  A  sum  of  £100  will  be  accepted  from  an 
immediate   purchaser.     Fo.    810b 

SCARBOROUGH.— A  good  Site  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  capable  of 
seating  about  600.     Price,   freehold,   £4,600.     Would   be  let.     Fo.    732b 

LANCASHIRE. — Large  town,  Theatre  established  2j  years,  making  a  net 
profit  of  £10  to  £12  per  week.  Lease  900  years,  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £23 
per  annum.      Price   £3,000,    inclusive.      Fo.    f4ob 

DURHAM. — A  fine  Theatre  seating  1,500.  Newly  built,  September,  1910. 
The  freehold  would  be  sold  or  would  be  let  at  £520  per  annum  with  a 
premium   of  £1,000.     The  only  place  of  amusement  in  the  town.     Fo.  859b 

LIVERPOOL. — A  large  Hall  seating  300,  in  a  fine  residential  part  of  the 
town,  including  dwelling  house.  Can  be  had  for  £90  per  annum  and  a 
small   premium.     A  fine   opportunity  for  a  beginner.     Fo.    788y 

YORKSHIRE.— Skating  Rink.  Large  town.  Easily  converted  into  a 
really  fine  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Price  £3,000.  Ground  Rent  £200. 
Might  be  let  on  lease  at  £1,200  per  annum.     Fo.    100c 

SHEFFIELD.— Site,  8,500  square  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £8,000,  or  building 
lease   at  £320  per  annum.     Fo.   106c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,  6,000  square  ft.  Excellent  position.  To  let  on 
building   lease.      £400  per  annum.     Fo.   io6cy 

SHEFFIELD.— Fine  Theatre  Site,  area  18,000  square  ft.,  to  let  011 
building  lease  at  £1,000  per  annum.     Splendid    position.     Fo.    1106c 

SUNDERLAND.— Site,  7,600  square  ft.,  in  central  position.  Price,  free- 
hold, £3,500.     Fo.    no6cy 

YORKSHIRE.— Skating  Rink  in  town  with  population  of  over  40,000. 
Plans  passed  for    converting   to   a   Theatre.      Rent.    £130.      No   premium. 

Fo.    io4cy 


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32 


THE     CINEMA. 


April,   1912. 


LIVERPOOL.— Site,     nearly    8,ooo    square    ft.     Price,    freehold, 
Adjoining  properly   could  be  purchased  it  further  space  desired.     Fo.    n  9c 
LANCASHIRE.— The    best    theatre    in  a   large  town   could   be  purchased 
16,000,   freehold.     Remarkable    opportunity.     Fo.    togcy 


LIVERPOOL. — Site,    nearly    10,000    square     ft. 
Price  .£23,500      Fo.   noc 


Very     good     position. 


LIVERPOOL—  bite,  8,000  square  ft.,  in  excellent  position.  Price 
£  10,000,  freehold.     Fo.    1 1     j 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  40,000  square  ft.     Price  £6,750,  freehold.     Fo.  118c 

LEEDS.  — Excellent  Site,  12,000  square  ft.  Price  £45,000.  The  adjoining 
property  with   12,000  square   It.     Price  £15,000.     Fo.    115c 

LEEDS. — Good  Site,  14,000  square  ft.  Close  to  station.  Freehold,  for 
sale  at   a  low  figure.     Fo.    115CV 

LIVERPOOL. — Site  in  centre  of  city,  two  frontages.  Lease  75  years. 
Price  £7,500,   Ireehold.     8,000  square  ft.     Fo.    i23Cy 

BIRKENHEAD. — Site,  8,coo  square  ft.  Price  £1,575,  freehold  90  U.  by 
00   ft.     Adjoining  corner  building   can  be   obtained.     Fo.   119c 

BIRKENHEAD. — Site,  31,000  square  ft.  Price  £7,000,  including  Build- 
ing producing  income.     Fo.   119CV 

BIRKENHEAD. — In  very  fine  position,  18,000  square  ft.     Price  £2,500. 

Fo.  120c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,    10,000  square   ft.     Price  £5,000,  freehold.     Fo.    i2icy 

BOLTON. — Site,  in  splenaia  position,  at  present  occupied  by  seven 
shops.  Price,  freehold,  £9,500,  or  would  let  on  lease  at  £380.  16,000 
square  ft.     Fo.   122c 

BRADFORD. — Site,  149,000  square  ft.,  four  frontages.  Low  price  tor 
ireehold.     Fo.  129c 

HULL. — Site,  04  ft.  by  94  it.     Magnificent  corner  Site.     Freehold,   £5,000. 

Fo.   128C5' 

HULL. — Site,  6,840  square  ft.  Close  to  railway  station.  At  present 
having  shop,   house,  stabling,    &c     Price  £1,500,  freehold.     Fo.   134c 

HULL. — Site,  48  ft.  by  63  ft.     Freehold,  £1,500.     Fo.  128c 

HULL. — 4,000  square   ft.     Freehold.    £2,500.     Fo.   127CV 

BIRKENHEAD. — bite  in  a  tine  position,  12,000  square  ft.,  frontage  72  ft. 
Price  £6,400,  or  would  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  i32cy 

BIRKENHEAD. —A  very  good  Site,  165  ft.  by  172  ft.,  with  house  bunt 
on  portion  of  the  property,  from  which  a  rental  of  nearly  £300  is  being 
derived.     Price  £7,000,  freehold.     Fo.  133c 

BIRKENHEAD. — In  central  situation.  Area  23,000  square  tT  .Price 
£10,000.     Fo.   I33cy 

CHESHIRE. — Theatre  in  large  town.  Seating  300,  with  standing  room 
for  50.  Interior  tastefully  decorated  and  nicely  fitted.  To  be  let  for 
£62  per  annum.  Price  £300,  which  includes  electric  light  plant,  machine, 
&c,   or  would   take   a   partner.      Fo.    137c 

SOUTH    OF    ENGLAND. 

KENT. — The  newly  built  property,  35  ft.  by  100  ft.  Now  used  as  a 
Skating  Rink,  will  cost  an  extremely  small  sum  to  convert  to  a  Cinemato- 
graph. Theatre.  Rent  £200.  Lease  7,  14,  21  years.  No  premium.  If  de- 
sired, the  Skating  Rink  can  still  be  carried  on,  leaving  a  Hall  79  ft.  by 
i<  ft.,  which   could  be  used  for  Cinematograph  purposes.     Fo.   508a 

KEN'l. — Large  seaside  resort.  An  important  property  having  a  frontage 
of  650  ft.  to  the  sea  with  a  private  Promenade.  Capable  of  accommodating, 
in  addition  to  the  Cinematograph  Theatre,  various  other  properties  for 
amusements,  together  with  shops,  &c.  Although  a  sum  of  £40,000 _  has  been 
expended  on  the  property,    the  freehold  will  be   sold  for  £16,000.     F'o.    722b 

HAMPSHIRE.— A  nice  little  Hall,  fitted  with  electric  light  plant,  doing 
a  large  business  with  the  Military,  being  close  to  the  Camps.  Price  £250, 
inclusive.     Rent  £64  per  annum.     Fo.    1:23b 

KENT.  — Cinematograph  Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  550,  in  a 
large  seaside  resort,  requiring  £250  for  furnishing.  Rent  £200  per  annum. 
Price  £250.     Fully  licensed,  ready  for   opening  except  furnishing.     Fo.    442y 

WORTHING.— A    freehold    Site   situated   in    a    most   prominent    position, 
and   having  entrances  in   three  thoroughfares,    at   present  consisting  of   foui 
shops  and  two  private  houses.     Easily   convertible.     Would  be   let   or  sold. 
Fo.    744b 

SOUTH  COAST. — Large  town  and  well  patronised  pleasure  resort.  Cine- 
matograph Theatre  now  in  course  of  erection.  Corner  premises  with  hand- 
some entrance.  Seating  capacitv  500.  Price,  freehold,  £6,500  (open  to 
offer).     Fo.   667.V 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Site  in  best  part  of  the  town,  40  ft.  by  100  It. 
Freehold.  £1.000.     Fo.   117c 

PORTSMOUTH.— Site,   goou  position,  51  ft.  by  160  ft.     Freehold,   £1,0. ... 

Fo.   129CV 

PORTSMOUTH. — Site,  67  ft.  by  100  ft.     Low  price  for  freehold.     Fo.   ncr 

SOUTHAMPTON. — Site,  admirably  situated  for  a  Theatre.  Lease  82 
years.     Ground  Rent  £50.     Price  £6,000.     Frontage  100   ft.,  depth  80  ft. 

Fo.    132c 


SOUTHAMPTON.— Very   large  Hall,    easily  adaptable, 
Freehold.     £7.000.       Fo.    i^ic 


ft.    by    140  tt. 


CHANNEL  ISLANDS.— Large  town.  Theatre,  with  seating  capacity  ot 
300,  to'be  sold  as  a  going  concern  for  £150.     Fo.  n6cy 

EAST    OF   ENGLAND. 

SUFFOLK.— Large  fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  Frontage  i<4  ft.,  depth 
-5  ft.  Licensed  to  seat  2,000.  Built  two  years  ago  and  heretofore  used  as 
a  Skating  Rink.  Price,  freehold,  £3,000.  Might  be  let.  A  really  well- 
built  property  and  easily   convertible.     Fo.    711b 


NORFOLK.— Fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  A  Cinematograph  Theatre, 
&c,  making  net  profit  of  about  £600  per  annum.  Price,  inclusive,  £1,000. 
Long  lease.     Rent  £175   per  annum.     Fo.   641b 


EAST  COAST. — Well-known  seaside  town.  Large  building,  splendidly 
adapted  for  a  Cinematograph  incatre.  No  amusements  whatever  at  prc'- 
sent.     Price  £1,100.     Part  can   remain  on   mortgage  if   required.     Fo.  567b 

SUFFOLK.  — Large  town.  Skating  Rink,  easily  adaptable.  Price,  free- 
hold, £3,500.     Might  be  let.     Fo.   114c 

WEST  OF    ENGLAND   81   WALES. 

CHESHIRE. — Important  seaside  town  with  very  large  population. 
Splendid  Site  in  a  good  position,  31  ft.  by  100  ft.  Price  £1,600.  Freehold 
portion   can  remain.     Fo.  619a 

GLAMORGAN.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  about  750  with  a 
balcony.     Rent  £250.     Price,    inclusive  of   everything,    £400.     Fo.    732V 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— A  very  good  Theatre  in  a  fine  position,  60  It. 
by  112  ft.,  seating  900.  Rental  £650.  Lease  14  years.  Price,  including 
everything,   £800.     Fo.   634b 

GLAMORGAN. — Moderate  sized  Hall,  seating  about  350.  Making  a 
net  profit  of  about  £200  per  annum.  Rent  £225  per  annum  would  be  ac- 
cepted without  a  premium.  On  the  property  is  an  electric  light  generating 
ulant.      F'o.    840b 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE. —  Large  manufacturing  town.  A  property  situate 
in  the  best  position,  comprising  two  good  Shops  and  Hall  at  rear  with 
entrance  between  the  shops.  Can  be  extended  to  seat  750  to  800.  Lease  21 
years.  Rent  £200,  rising  to  £450  per  annum.  Price  for  the  freehold, 
£4.000.     Fo.   886b 

RHONDDA  VALLEY.— Large  town.  Substantially  built  Skating  Rink, 
175  ft.  by  65  ft.,  could  be  readily  adapted  into  a  Picture  Palace.  Within 
half  a  minute  of  the  main   tram  route.     Will  be  let  or   sold.     Fo.   672b 

DEVONSHIRE. — Very   large  town.     Picture  Theatre,   seating  425.    Profit- 
able  business.     Price  £3,000,   half    of   which  can   remain  on  mortgage. 
Fo.   799y 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Very  large  town.  Splendid  Skating  Rink. 
Area  about  14,000  square  ft.,  two  frontages,  easily  adaptable  for  Cine- 
matograph Theatre.  Rent  £800  per  annum.  Splendid  opportunity.  Centre 
of    the    town,   trams    passing   door.      Fo.    nicy 

SOMERSET. — A  newly  erected  Hall  seati"g  about  300.  fitted  tip-up  seats, 
fully  licensed  for  Staee  Pljys  and  Cinema,  the  nnlv  permanent  building  of  the 
sort  in  the  town.  Offers  wanted  to  rent  or  purchase. — H.  Wood  &  Co.,  The 
Parade,  Min>.head. 

SWINDON. — Site  in  splendid  position,  with  two  frontages,  nearly  10,000 
square  ft.     Price,   freehold,  £2,000,   or  would  be    let   on  building  lease. 

Fo.    112c 

CHESHIRE.— Large  shipbuilding  town.  Music  Hall  for  sale.  Freehold 
at  a  low  figure.     Fo.  n8cy 

CARDIFF.  — Site  in  one  of  the  best  positions  in  the  city.  Freehold  for 
sale,  or  will  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  125CV 

BRISTOL.— Corner  Site,  95  ft.  by  99  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £2,500,  or  on 
long  lease   at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.   124c 

CARDIFF— Exceptional  Premises,  with  three  frontages,  4,000  square  ft. 
Ground  Rent  £300,    on  long  lease.     Fo.    126CV 

CARDIFF.— Centre  of  city,  67  ft.  by  127  ft.  Price  £2,500,  or  to  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50.     Premium  £1,500.     Fo.   126c 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE— Seating  about  300.  R.ent  £52  per  annum.  Price 
£250  for  everything  as   it  stands.      Fo.    148c 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Theatre  now  building;  two  frontages.  To  be 
completed    September   next.      Seating    1,500.      Rent    about    X.400   per    annum. 

Fo.    146c 


SCOTLAND. 


GLASGOW.  — Handsome  Theatre,  80  ft.  by  130  ft.  Seating  1,700,  taking 
nearly  £50  per  week.  Price  inclusive  for  this  valuable  going  concern, 
£1.000.      Fo.    j2pb . 

GLASGOW.— Cinematograph  Theatre.  Frontage  45  ft.,  depth  90  ft.  At 
present  seating  only  550.  Taking  about  £25  per  week,  under  management. 
Expenses  about  £18  per  week.  Price  £850  for  everything,  which  includes 
the  residence  on   the  property.     Fo.   533b 

EDINBURGH.— Hall  with  seating  capacity  of  350,  fitted  complete. 
Books  can  be  inspected.  No  opposition  in  the  district.  Rent  £ioo  per 
annum.     Price  £230,   to  include   everything.     Fo.  787b 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


A  NEW  HARPER'S  Ticket  Machine  for  sale,  with  1,000  Metal  Tickets. 
Cost  £ iC.     Price  £8.     Apply  box  2^1,  Office  of  The  Cinema. 

A  TWO-MAN  UAL  and  Pedal  Pipe  Organ,  by  leading  maker,  for  sale,  with  14 
stops,  automatic  player,  and  a  motor  blower.  Cost  £350.  Price  £225.  Apply 
Box  232,  Office  of  The  Cinema.  

.EOLIAN  GRAND  ORCHF.STRELLE  ORGAN,  with  large  number  of 
stops,  knee  swell,   Src,   in   carved  oak  case.- Apply,   Box  236,   Cinema  Office. 


Printed  by  St    Clements  Press,  Limit....  Portueal  Street,    Kingsway,  W.C.,  and  published    by  the  Proprietors,  the  Cinema  News  &  Property 

Gazette,  Lto.,   21,  North  An  Hey  Street,  Oxf  >rd  Street,  W. 


May,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


-YOU    SAVE     MONEY 


ON 


PICTURE     THEATRE     EQUIPMENT 

and   Reduction   in   Electricity  Accounts 


BY    CONSULTING 


Mr.  JAMES  W.  BARBER,  A.M.I.E.E., 

Independent  Consulting  Electrical  and  Cinematograph  Engineer 

(Author  of  "The  Bioscope  Electrician's  Handbook," 
"  Alternating  Currents,"  etc.,  etc.) 

Scltemes  prepared  and  advice  given  on  all  Picture  Theatre  Equipment. 
Inspections  and   Insurance  of  Electrical  Plant  against  Breakdown,  etc. 

Address-ARUYLE     CHAMBERS, 
106,    CHARING    CROSS     ROAD,     LONDON,     W.C. 

Every  operator  should  possess  a  copy  of  "  The  Bioscope  Elec- 
trician's Handbook."— "The  Operator's  Vade  Mecum"  (vide  Press), 
1/-  post  free  from  the  above.  Also  "  Alternating  Currents— Their 
Nature  and  Their  Uses."  -A  Practical  Manual  for  the  Bioscope 
Operator.  6Jd.  post  free.  Tel.  12598  Central. 


FILMS  CLEANED  &  REPAIRED 

BY  CHEMICAL   PROCESS. 

3s.    per    1,000    feet    inclusive. 

We  are  Cleaning  for  the  Trade  all  over  the  World. 

ALL    DONE   BY   HAND.         NO  MACHINERY   USED 
PARTS  OF  PROJECTORS  SUPPLIED. 

And  Repairs  of  Every  Description  promptly  done  by  Experienced  Workmen 


TRY    OUR    NEW    EXPRESS    SERVICE. 

Films  sent  for  at  9  a.m.   returned  Cleaned 
and  Repaired  by  6  o'clock  in  the  Evening. 


F.  HATE,  6,  Ingestre  Place,  Golden  Square,  London,  W. 

Telephone   976S  Gerrard. 


The  "Allefex"  is  a  sound-effects  machine  for  accompanying 
moving  pictures.  More  than  30  different  effects,  which  can  all  be 
worked  by  one  man.  All  the  effects  of  land,  sea  and  sky, 
including  battles,  trains,  motor  cars,  horses,  lightning,  etc.,  etc. 
Call  and  hear  it,  or  write  for  illustrated  list. 


Andrews'  Film  Hire  Service  is  ihoroughly  Up-to-date.  The  whole 
of  the  films  released  weekly  in  England  are  reviewed  by  our  own 
buyer  who  devotes  his  whole  time  to  the  work.  Programs  to 
suit  all  classes  of  Picture  Theatres  at  the  lowest  possible  prices. 
May  we  submit  particulars  and  specimen  programs? 


ANDREWS'  PICTURES,  LTD. 


CINE   HOUSE,    GREEK    STREET, 
LONDON,    W. 


0 


a 


PICTURE  PLAYS 

—     AND     — 

HOW   TO   WRITE   THEM. 

This  book  is  a  complete  course  of  instruction 

in  plot-writing,  and  shows   how    to 

turn  ideas  into  money. 


Price  5/=,  post  free. 

Popular  Edition   (unabridged),  2/9,  post  free. 

Write  for  Complete  List  of  Cinematograph  Books. 

THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    PRESS. 

16,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  London,  W.C. 


\UJ 


0 


Telephone  Xo. 
9804  Gerrard. 


Telegraphic  Address: 
"  Grampires,  London." 


LONDON  BIOSCOPE  SCHOOL 

9,    ST.    MARTIN'S    COURT, 
CHARING    CROSS   ROAD,  W.C. 


All  those  wanting  Experienced 
OPERATORS   81  ASSISTANTS 

apply  as  above. 


TELEPHONE:    12S0  HOLBORN. 


E.P.Allam&Co., 

ELECTRICAL    ENGINEERS, 

28,  GRAY'S  INN  ROAD,  HOLBORN,  W.C. 

(Established   21  Years.) 


Specialists   in  Arc   and   Incandescent 
Lighting  for  Cinematograph  Theatres. 

HEATING,  VENTILATING, 

SIGNS,    MOTORS,    and 

GENERATORS. 


SOLE  PROPRIETORS  OF  THE 


METAL     LAMP. 

British  made  and  most  durable  filaments. 


Special    Prices     Quoted    on    Application. 


Write  for  our  quotation  and  designs  for  the  most  effective  and 
economical  method  of  lighting  your  premises. 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   1912. 


® 

The  Pioneer  Film 

Agency limited, 

Bioscope 
Outfitters 

and 

Film 
Hirers. 

Personal 
and 
Prompt 
Attention. 

RELIABLE 
QUALITY, 

27,    Cecil    Court,    Charing 
Cross  Road,  LONDON,  W.C. 

Telephones —                        Tel.   Address: 
Day  Line -9730  City.            "WHEATUCKE 
Night  L.ne— 134  North.            LONDON." 

-    OUR   FEATURE   IS    - 

15/- per  1,000  feet, 

or  write  for  our  Suggested 
-     -    Programmes  of    -     - 

5,500  feet,  with  change, 

£3  10  0. 

All  Feature  Films  Lowest  Price. 

WRITE    AT    ONCE. 

Ltd. 


CROSS'S  PICTURES, 

12,  MACCLESFIELD  ST.,  SHAFTESBUR/  AVENUE,  W. 

Phone,  9844  Gerrard.  |  A. B.C.  Code,  5th  e  1.  |  Wires,"  Impicrosa,  London. 


Feoture  Film  specialists 

VACANCIES    FOR    THE    FOLLOWING :— 

Dove  and  the  Hawk  (exclusive),  1,315  ft.  ;  Nelson-Moran  Fight 
(exclusive),  2,840  ft.  ;  Saved  by  Her  Lion,  1,012  ft. ;  Diamond 
S.  Ranch,  1,000  ft. ;  Blackmail,  2,266  ft.  ;  The  Danites,  2,000  ft.  ; 
Harvest  of  Sin,  1,250  ft.  ;  Hypnotic  Detective,  1,000  ft.  ; 
Reckoning,  824  ft.;  Grub  Stake  Mortgage,  1,000  ft.; 
Zigomar  v.  Nick  Carter,  3,600  ft.  ;  Love  and  Lemons,  995  ft.  ; 
Prosecuting  Counsel,  1,000  ft.;  Fisher  Girl  of  Cornwall, 
1,150  ft.  ;  Red  Cross  Martyr,  1,040  ft.  ;  Objections  Over-ruled, 
1,000  ft.;  Vanity  Fair,  3,211  ft.;  Arson  at  Sea,  1,686  ft.; 
Absalom,  1,340  ft.;  Auld  Lang  Syne,  1,624  ft.;  At  the  Bottom 
of  the  Sea,  2,000ft.;  Duel  of  the  Candles,  1,000  ft.;  Cowboy 
Pugilist,  950  ft.;  The  Queen's  Necklace,  2,280  ft.  ;  Arrah-na- 
Pogue,  3,000  ft.  ;  Broadway  Meets  Mountains,  990  ft. ;  Mystery 
of  Souls,  3,100  ft.;  Before  Yorktown,  2,000  ft.;  Run  on  the 
Bank,  1,014  ft.;  Aviator's  Generosity,  2,560  ft.;  Dead  Man's 
Child,  2,624  ft.  ;  Sins  of  the  Fathers,  2,300  ft. ;  The  Battle, 
1,100  ft.;  Siege  of  Calais,  2,045  ft'.  Foe  to  Richelieu, 
2,480  ft.;  Aeroplane  Elopement,  1,033  ft- :  Court  Intrigue, 
Henry  VIII.,  2,640  ft.;  The  Martyrs,  1,370  ft.;  Great  Mine 
Disaster,  2,450  ft.  ;  Lieut.  Rose  and  Battleship,  1,085  ft-  '.  Lieut. 
Daring,   Secret   Service,  770  ft.;    The   Black    Arrow,    1,000   ft. 

OUR    FAMOUS    HIRE    SERVICES   at    10/-  &    15/-   per 
1,000   ft.,  including  Feature  and    Poster  Films. 


Export  Department. 


We  always  have  in  Stock  over  a  million   feet  of  Films  of  all 

Makes,    from    |d.    per   ft.  ■ Feature  Films   for   Sale, 

twelve  weeks  from  release,  from  id.  per  ft.     Send  for  Lists. 


J.  S.  Selway  &  Co. 

BUILDERS  &    CONTRACTORS. 


We  are  prepared  to  estimate  free 
of    all    charge    for    the  erection  of 

HIGH- CLASS 

Cinema  Theatres 


We   undertake   all    descriptions  of 
decorations. 

On  receipt  of  letter  our  representa- 
tive will  wait  upon  clients  to  take 
details  of   requirements. 


517,HighRd.,Chiswick,W. 


"EXCLUSIVE"  FILMS .  . 

ARE 

"FEATURE"  FILMS  .  . 

RENTED    TO 

ONE  HALL  PER  TOWN. 


«i 


To  "Star"  an  Exclusive  Feature  Film 
is  the  ideal  method  of  attracting  the 
public  to  picture  theatres  —  to  your 
picture  theatre — and  the  better  the  film 
and  the  more  it  complies  with  the 
demand  of  the  people  for  sensational 
subjects,  the  greater  will  be  its  success. 
We  are  handling  a  number  of  these 
"  Winning  Exclusives,"  and  will  be  glad 
oHhe  opportunity  to  send  full  particulars. 
Please  remember  that  all  our  films  are 
rented  on  the  "One  Hall  per  Town" 
principle  and  therefore  cannot  be 
duplicated  by  your  competitors. 


M0N0P0L  FILM  CO.  of  GREAT  BRITAIN 

CINE  HOUSE,  GREEK  STREET,  LONDON,  W. 


General  Manager: 
FREDERICK  MARTIN. 


If  lies: 
'SISTERHOOD,  LONDON. 


THE    CINEMA   NEWS   AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE,    MAY,    IOI2. 


RUFFELL 


IMPERIAL 

SYNDICATE,  LIMITED. 


BIOSCOPE 


TEk-EPHONKSi 
6695  A  7230  GEHRORO. 


SPECIALISTS    IN    KINEMATOGRAPH    FILM    SERVICES    and    APPARATUS 

166  &  168,  SHAFTESBURY  AVENUE. 


TELEGRAMS-. 

RUFFOSOOPE,   LONDON. 


NEWS    AND    PROPERTY    GAZETTE. 

A  MONTHLY  MAGAZINE  OF  IMPORTANCE  TO  ALL  INTERESTED  IN  THE  CINEMATOGRAPH  WORLD 

Edited    bv    Low    Warren. 


No.  4.     Vol.  I. 


MAY,     1912. 


Registered. 


Price  One  Penny. 

By  Post,  2d. 


EDITORIAL    AND    BUSINESS   NOTICES. 

THE  CINEMA  News  and  Property  Gazette  is  published  on  the  first  of  each 
month.  Copies  can  be  obtained  through  any  Newsagent  or  Railway  Bookstall 
in  Town  or  Country,  or  will  be  sent  direct  from  the  Office  for  2S.  per  annum, 
post  free. 

News  items  of  interest  to  those  engaged  in  the  Cinematograph  Industry  will 
■be  welcomed,  and  communications  should  reach  the  Office  not  later  than  the 
26th  of  the  month,  if  intended  for  publication  in  the  following  month's  issue. 

Articles,  photographs,  or  drawings  intended  for  publication  must  be  accom- 
panied by  a  stamped,  addressed  envelope,  in  case  of  return,  but  the  Editor  will 
not  be  responsible  for  the  safe  return  of  rejected  MS.,  photographs,  or  drawings, 
ihough  every  care  will  be  taken  of  them. 

Edtcrial  communications,  which  should  always  be  accompanied  by  the  name 
.and  address  of  the  sender,  should  be  addressed  to  the  Editor. 


All  enquiries   respecting    Advertisements  and  business   matters    should    be 
addressed  to  the  Manager,  at  the  Offices  of  The  Cinema, 

21,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford  Street,  W. 

Wires  :  "Faddist,  London."  'Phones:  Gerrard  7676  &  8798 

A  Record ! 

UNDERSTAND  that  the  Selig  film,  «  Chris- 
topher Columbus,"  which  was  released  by  the 
New  Century  Film  Service,  Ltd.,  on  Easter 
Monday,  is  establishing  records  in  every 
direction.  Readers  will  remember  that  I 
predicted  a  big  success  for  this  magnificent  film  when 
it  was  first  reviewed  in  these  columns  recently, 
and  the  news  that  crowded  theatres  have  been  the  rule 
where  it  has  been  exhibited  must  be  very  gratifying  both 
to  the  Selig  Polyscope  Co.  (of  which  Mr.  E.  H.  Montagu 
is  the  sole  London  agent)  and  to  the  New  Century  Film 
'  Service,  of  Leeds,  to  whom  picture  theatregoers  owe 
this  exceptional  artistic  treat.  I  understand  that  such 
record  business  is  being  done  in  the  theatres  where  the 
film  is  shown  that  it  is  already  being  re-booked.  As  an 
instance  of  its  drawing  power  I  may  mention  that  in  one 
theatre  in  Bristol  12,801  persons  paid  for  admission. 
This  is  surely  something  of  a  record. 

<*- 
Bank  Holiday  Business. 

Whilst  on  the  subject  of  record  bookings  it  is  interest- 
ing to  state   that  the   business  done  by  the   majority  of 
I  London    and    provincial    theatres    during    the     Easter 


holidays  has  been  altogether  phenomenal.  In  London 
this  was  no  doubt  largely  due  to  the  fact  that  a  good 
many  people  were  deterred  from  going  away  owing  to 
the  cancelling  of  excursion  tickets  by  the  railway 
companies  on  account  of  the  Coal  Strike.  It  is  an  ill- 
wind  that  blows  nobody  any  good,  and  the  cinemato- 
graph theatre  proprietors  must  assuredly  congratulate 
themselves  upon  this  satisfactory  state  of  affairs.  Some 
idea  of  the  business  done  in  London  on  Easter  Monday 
may  be  gathered  from  the  fact  that  in  at  least  four 
instances  of  which  I  know,  cinema  theatres  in  the  out- 
lying suburbs  took  sums  varying  from  ^"90  to  £110. 
Pity  it  is  that  Easter  Monday  does  not  come  more 
frequently  if  such  takings  are  to  be  the  rule. 

<•- 
The  £  s.  d.  of  Sunday  Opening. 

At  the  April  meeting  of  the  London  County  Council 
there  was  a  protracted  discussion  on  the  recent  report 
embodying  the  financial  results  of  the  Sunday  opening 
of  cinematograph  theatres  in  London  during  the  latter 
half  of  last  year.  It  was  pointed  out  that  there  was  an 
immense  disproportion  between  the  takings  of  the  shows 
and  the  wages  earned.  There  were,  it  was  said,  gross 
receipts  ^"55,000  odd,  and  total  expenditure  ^"49,000 
odd,  and  of  the  latter  amount  ^12,000  represented  wages. 
The  question  was  asked  where  the  balance  of  severa 
thousands  of  pounds  had  gone.  Surely  the  Theatres 
and  Music-halls  Committee  have  no  need  to  ask.  Many 
very  deserving  charities  have  received  substantial  sums 
during  the  year,  and  added  to  this  the  licencees  of  the 
various  theatres  have  had  to  be  remunerated  for  rent, 
hire  of  films,  electric  light  and  running  expenses. 

<#- 

To  suggest  that  many  proprietors  make  a  practice  of 
"  cooking  "  their  returns  is  altogether  unjustified  by  the 
facts.  Such  a  thing  may  have  occurred  in  one  or  two 
isolated  instances  in  the  past  with  the  result  that  the 
Council  cancelled  its  permit,  but  it  is  far  from  truth  that 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   1912. 


it  is  a  general  practice,  and  it  is  surprising  that  only  one 
Councillor  had  the  fairness  to  say  so.  In  the  result  the 
report  was  referred  back  for  further  consideration,  and  it 
was  clearly  foreshadowed  that  the  Council  intends  to 
reconsider  the  special  regulations  governing  Sunday 
opening  at  present  in  force.    The  trade  must  watch  this. 

<&■ 
Suggested  L.C.C.  Censorship. 

The  London  County  Council  has  shown  its  good  sense 
by  turning  down  a  suggestion  that  they  should  adopt  a 
policy  of  restricting  the  number  of  picture  theatres  to  the 
reasonable  requirements  of  each  district,  and,  further, 
that  all  pictures  exhibited  in  cinematograph  theatres 
should  be  carefully  supervised.  Mr.  Smallwood,  who 
played  a  leading  part  in  the  discussion,  took  an  alarmist 
view  of  the  situation  when  he  suggested  that  cinemato- 
graph theatres,  as  a  whole,  had  a  bad  effect  upon  the 
childish  mind.  The  Council  very  properly  came  to  the 
conclusion  that  applicants  must  be  the  best  judges  of  the 
demand  of  a  neighbourhood  for  the  entertainment  they 
proposed  to  provide,  and  that  as  to  a  censorship  they 
should  continue  the  practice  of  dealing  with  specific 
complaints. 

««- 

As  showing  what  little  need  there  is  for  greater  super- 
vision of  films,  it  was  pointed  out  that  only  six  out  of  a 
total  of  twenty-eight  borough  councils  had  made  any 
representation  to  the  Council  on  the  subject.  This  is 
fairly  conclusive  evidence  that  no  such  demand  exists. 
After  all  it  must  be  remembered  that  the  licensee  who 
shows  improper  pictures  in  his  theatre  would  have  to  pay 
the  penalty  of  his  indiscretion  by  having  his  licence  re- 
voked. That  is  the  strongest  weapon  the  Council  can  wield. 

<*- 

A  Wide-awake  Publicity  Manager. 

Publicity  is  the  life  and  soul  of  the  cinematograph 
business.  The  more  it  is  boomed  the  bigger  its  success, 
and  most  certainly  there  is  no  man  in  the  business  more 
wide-awake  to  the  possibilities  of  press  publicity  than 
Mr.  Waters  the  energetic  and  enterprising  advertising 
manager  of  the  Hepworth  Manufacturing  Company. 
It  is  next  to  impossible  at  the  present  time  to  pick  up 
any  of  our  leading  papers  without  finding  an  article  on 
the  picture  industry,  and,  incidentally,  a  subtle  reference  to 
the  Hepworth  films.  Courtsey  is  a  valuable  commodity 
though  it  costs  nothing,  and  perhaps  it  is  because  Mr. 
Waters  is  always  courteous  and  has  a  pleasant  word  for 
everyone  that  his  skilfully  laid  publicity  campaign  is 
such  a  success.     Hearty  congtatulations. 

The  "  Titanic  "  Disaster. — A  Suggestion. 

The  horrifying  disaster  which  has  overtaken  the  mam- 
moth liner  "  Titanic "  has  called  forth  wide-spread 
sorrow  throughout  the  world,  and  the  response  to 
appeals  for  funds  for  the  dependents  of  those  who  lost 
their  lives  has  been  immediate  and  gratifying  in  its 
magnitude.  Among  the  first  to  offer  help  were  the 
proprietors  of  many  cinematograph  theatres,  and  it  has 
been  suggested  that  if  they  were  asked  to  do  so 
practically  every  theatre  and  hall  in  the  country  would 
gladly  devote  the  proceeds  of  a  special  performance  to  so 
deserving  an  object  as  the  "Titanic"  Relief  Fund.     Mr_ 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


J .  E.  Park,  the  managing  director  of  Picture  Theatres,  Ltd., 
who  has  already  arranged  a  benefit  performance  at  the 
theatres  under  his  control,  says  :  "  I  would  suggest  that  a 
certain  day  should  be  set  aside  by  each  town  on  which 
every  picture  theatie  should  give  its  entertainment  for 
the  benefit  of  the  fund.  The  assistance  of  the  Press 
would  be  very  effective  in  advising  the  public  of  the 
particular  day.  There  are  about  400  such  halls  in 
London  alone,  and  at  least  £5  per  hall  on  the  average 
might  be  looked  for  as  the  result  of  the  special  perform- 
ance, if  organised  on  the  one  day,  and  aided  by  the' 
Press."  There  are  many  of  us  in  the  cinematograph 
industry  who  have  lost  friends  on  the  "  Titanic,"  and 
certainly  there  is  not  one  of  us  Avho  would  not  do  what 
he  could  to  help  in  relieving  the  immediate  wants  of 
those  dependent  upon  the  brave  men  who  have  gone 
down.  To  each  and  all  we  would  commend  the  appeal 
which  appears  elsewhere  in  this  issue,  knowing  full  well 
that  all  will  do  their  best  to  help  so  noble  a  Cause. 

Death  of  Mr.  James   Petrie   Chalmers. 

The  news  was  received  by  the  Cinematograph  Trade 
in  this  country,  with  much  regret,  of  the  death  of  Mr. 
James  Petrie  Chalmers,  editor-proprietor  of  the  "  Moving 
Picture  World,"  the  leading  cinema  paper  in  America. 
Mr.  Chalmers  was  attending  a  convention  of  Ohio 
exhibitors  at  Dayton,  U.S.A.,  and  liis  death  was  the 
result  of  an  accident.  The  deceased  journalist  was 
untiring  in  his  efforts  on  behalf  of  the  cinematograph 
industry,  and  rendered  valuable  service  to  the  Trade  in 
America,  both  personally  and  through  the  columns  of 
his  always  interesting  and  admirably  conducted  journal. 

Child   Mimics. 

Apropos  of  the  article  printed  in  a  recent  issue  of  The 
Cinema  on  "  Dramatic  Motion  and  the  Child,"  in  which  a 
plea  was  put  forward  that  for  the  sake  of  the  child  greater 
care  should  be  exercised  to  avoid  the  crude,  the  careless 
and  the  cynical  in  the  making  of  films,  the  following 
communication  from  Dr.  D.  J.  Munro,  in  a  daily  paper, 
is  worthy  of  note :  "  I  feel  that  I  can  delay  no  longer 
in  appealing  to  you  to  use  the  great  influence  of  your 
paper  in  a  campaign  against  offensive  cinematograph 
pictures.  I  have  a  small  son,  aged  six,  and  while  I  have 
no  objection  to  his  antics  as  soldier,  scout,  or  redskin, 
it  is  time  to  interfere  with  his  play  when  he  is  rescued  at 
the  last  possible  moment,  a  rope  around  his  neck,  sus- 
pended from  the  top  of  the  wood-shed  door,  '  in  order  to 
give  his  nurse  a  fright.'  This  was  in  direct  imitation  of 
a  cinematograph  display.  Such  horrors  are  rapidly 
demoralising  decent  children  ;  they  talk  everlastingly  of 
killing,  especially  at  meal  times  ;  the  boys  learn  in- 
cendiarism, the  girls  revel  in  beastly  death-bed  scenes. 
These  brutalising  melodrama  films  need  the  censor  tar 
more  than  problem  plays,  for  the  latter  appeal  only  to 
those  adults  whose  mental  processes  are  already  attuned 
to  their  pitch  (the  word  '  pitch  '  may  be  interpreted  in 
either  sense)."  Obviously  Dr.  Munro's  remedy  is  to  be 
more  careful  where  he  allows  his  "  small  son  of  six  "  to 
go.  All  films  are  not  intended  for  children  any  more 
than  are  all  pantomimes.  There  is  as  much  to  be  said 
against  the  one  as  the  other,  and  in  comparison  the 
educative  value  of  a  good  film  is  infinitely  greater. 

THE  GREAT  MOMENT  has  come  for  you  to  book  that 
sensational  film  "GIPSY  BLOOD,'  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  3. 


May,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


AN     APPEAL 


TO    EVERY    CINEMATOGRAPH    THEATRE    PROPRIETOR. 


HE  horrifying  disaster  which  has  overtaken 
the  "  Titanic,"  the  largest  ocean-liner  afloat, 
has  thrilled  the  whole  world,  and  called  forth 
such  wide-spread  but  unavailing  grief  as  has 
seldom  been  witnessed  in  these  islands. 
Even  now  that  all  the  details  of  the  terrible  story  are 

complete,  it   is  difficult  to  realise  that  this  magnificent 

floating  palace  with  all  but  a  few  of  its  vast  complement 

of  passengers  and  crew  has  found  a  grave  in  the  depths 

of  the  Atlantic  Ocean.     The  homes  of  two  great  nations 

have  been  desolated  by  the  catastrophe,  and  the  universal 

prayer  is  that   strength  and  fortitude  may  be  given  those 

plunged    into    mourning    to    bear 

their  overwhelming  trial.     In  the 

whole  history  of  the  sea  no  more 

terrible  story  has  been   told,  nor 

indeed  a   more   glorious  one,   for 

the   men    of   our    race    died    the 

death  of  heroes,  in  order  that  "  the 

women  and  children  "  might  live. 

But  their  death,  glorious  as  it   is, 

has  desolated  many  a  home,  and 

it  is  incumbent  upon  each  and  all 

■of  us  to  do  what  we  can  to  help 

the  sufferers  who  are  left  to  bear 

the   burden  which  fate  has  thrust 

upon  their  shoulders. 

A  Benefit  in  Every  Theatre. 

At  such  times  as  these  of 
national  disaster,  among  the  very 
first  to  offer  assistance  are  the  pro- 
prietors of  places  of  amusement, 
and  it  is  most  gratifying  to  be  able 
to  record  in  the  present  instance 
that  the  very  earliest  offers  of  help 
came  from  the  cinematograph 
theatre  proprietors  throughout  the 

•country.  So  far,  however  it  has  been  left  to  individual 
managements  to  suggest  performances  on  behalf  of 
the  "  Titanic "  Relief  Fund.  But  it  is  proposed 
that  the  effort  should  be  as  general  and  widespread  as 
possible,  in  order  that  no  stone  be  left  unturned  to  swell 
the  total  of  this  National  offering  to  the  sufferers  of  those 
who  died  so  valiantly.  We  appeal  with  confidence  there- 
fore to  the  proprietor  of  every  cinematograph  theatre 
and  hall  in  the  country  to  devote  the  proceeds  of  at  least 
one  performance  to  this  most  deserving  object.  Many 
of  the  leading  London  and  Provincial  theatres  are 
already  arranging  to  hold  such  performances.  We  ask 
■every  single  exhibitor  in  this  country  to  do  the  same. 
Co-operation  is  a  wonderful  thing,  and  it  is  surprising 
what  grand  results  can  be  achieved  if  only  everyone  does 
his  or  her  share. 

A  Duty  to  Ourselves. 

And  surely  in  the  whole  history  of  the  world  there 
could  be  no  more  appealing,  no  more  deserving  object 
for  which  to  work  than  that  of  the  "Titanic"  Relief  Fund. 
We  owe  it  to  ourselves  as  a  nation  to  do  everything  in 
our  power  for   the  widows  and  orphans  of  those  gallant 

Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swing,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "  WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  i. 


Brave  hearts  !  to  Britain's  pride 

Once  so  faithful  and  so  true, 

On  the  deck  of  fame  that   died. 


Soft  sigh  the  winds  of  Heaven 
o'er  their  grave  ! 
While    the     billows     mournful 

rolls 
And  the  mermaid's  song  con- 
doles, 
Singing  glory  to  the  souls 
Of  the  brave. 


men  who  went  to  their  deaths  among  the  icebergs  of  the 
Atlantic,  in  the  dark  watches  of  the  night,  without  a 
murmur,  and  without  pause,  in  order  that  the  weak  and 
helpless  might  remain.  They  died  as  Britons.  As 
Britons  we  are  proud  that  in  the  face  of  an  awful  death 
they  died  as  Britons  should. 

Deeds — Not  Words. 

But  mere  words  are  empty  things.  We  must  translate 
our  feelings  into  deeds.  We  must  do  all  that  in  us  lies  to 
help  the  dear  ones  they  have  left  behind.  We  who  are 
engaged  in  the  cinematograph  industry — especially  those 
of  us  who  own  or  manage  theatres 
— are  particularly  well  placed  to 
help  the  "  Titanic  "  Relief  Fund. 
Do  we  not  appeal  to  every  section 
of  the  public  to  support  our 
theatres  ?  Each  of  us  can  organise 
a  special  benefit  performance,  even 
in  the  smallest  town  or  village. 
Our  effort  will  not  be  in  vain.  The 
public  will  flock  to  every  perform- 
ance on  behalf  of  so  noble  a  cause, 
and  the  fund  will  receive  such  an 
addition  as  will  gladden  the  hearts 
of  us  all. 


THOMAS    CAMPBELL. 


How  to  Organise  a  Benefit. 

The  greater  number  of  us  have 
organised  benefit  performances  be- 
fore. But  for  the  guidance  of  those 


who  perchance  have  not  had  such 
experience,  I  may  perhaps  be  per- 
mitted to  offer  just  one  or  two 
suggestions,  I  trust,  therefore, 
these  remarks  will  be  accepted  in 
the  spirit  in  which  they  are  offered. 
In  the  first  place  organise  your 
benefit  performance  without  delay.  Time  is  of  the  utmost 
importance,  as  money  is  wanted  at  once.  Strengthen  your 
ordinary  programme  if  possible  by  the  inclusion  of  a 
number  of  vocal  and  instrumental  items.  Choose  an 
early-closing  night  if  possible  and  enlist  the  services  of 
prominent  local  amateurs.  They  will  be  able  to  help  you 
to  fill  your  house,  and  may — and  probably  will — attract 
a  number  of  new  and  permanent  patrons  to  the  theatre. 
We  ask  every  exhibitor  in  these  islands  to  do  what  lie 
can  for  the  cause,  knowing  full  well  from  long  years  of 
experience  that  real,  true  charity  and  kindliness  of 
heart  are  never  failing  qualities  in  the  showman's  world. 
In  full  confidence,  therefore,  that  the  response  will  be 
unanimous  and  immediate  we  leave  this  appeal  in  the 
hands  of  the  proprietors  and  managers  of  the  cinemato- 
graph theatres  and  halls  in  this  country.  We  know  that 
each  will  do  all  that  in  them  lies  to  discharge  what  is  a 
bounden  duty  upon  us  all  to  help  the  widows  and  father- 
less little  ones  who  have  been  left  behind  by  those  who 
answered  so  bravely  to  the  last  call  when  the  mighty 
leviathan  sank  to  her  grave  in  the  fathomless  depths  of 
the  ocean  on  the  night  of  April  14th.    God  rest  them  all. 

To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  "  THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOVE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role. 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   19  i  2. 


HOW  TO    EQUIP  A   COMPLETE    PICTURE 

THEATRE. 

AN    INFORMATIVE   ARTICLE    FOR   THE    OVERSEAS    EXHIBITOR. 


HE  overseas  showman,  who  is  just  about  thinking  of 
entering  the  cinematograph  business,  has  a  good  many 
things  to  consider  before  he  finally  takes  the  plunge. 
For  the  purposes  of  this  article,  which  is  written  for 
his  guidance,  we  will  assume  that  he  has  already 
purchased  his  bit  of  land  in  a  commanding  position  in 
a  small  or  big  town,  as  the  case  may  be. 

The  First  Thing  to  Do. 

The  first  thing  obviously  that  he  will  have  to  do  will  be  to  set 
about  arranging  for  the  erection  of  his  theatre  or  hall.  Here  we 
can  be  of  little  assistance  tc  him.  He  must  use  a  deal  of  common 
sense  in  his  selection  of  a  builder,  into  whose  hands  the  already 
prepared  plans  will  be  placed.  We  will,  in  the  first  place,  presume 
that  he  has  so  far  as  he  is  able  secured  compel  itive  and  inclusive 
estimates,  and  under  the  guidance  of  an  expert  has  accepted  what 
he  considers  is  a  fair  contract,  and  has  a  given  date  when  the 
building  will  be  finished  and  ready  for  fitting. 

Having  got  thus  far  we  will  take  it  that  the  local  building  con- 
tractor has  done  his  work  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  exhibitor,  and 
that  the  complete  structure  complies  with  all  the  requirements  of 
the  local  governing  authority,  should  such  exist.  Our  friend  is 
therefore  ready  to  listen  to  the  advice  of  those  who  know  and  can 
help  him  in  his  selection  of  the  necessary  fitments,  apparatus  and 
furnishing  that  go  to  the  making  of  a  well  and  properlv  equipped 
cinematograph  theatre  or  hall,  no  matter  whether  it  be  in  this 
country,  its  colonies,  or  elsewhere. 

How  and  Where  to  Buy. 

In  the  first  place  he  will  be  well  advised  to  communicate  with 
some  firm  or  firms  of  standing  in  England,  and  tell  them  as  fully 
as  possible  exactly  what  his  requirements  are  ;  how  much  he  has 
to  spend,  and  what  class  of  show  he  intends  running.  If  he  knows 
the  trade  this  will  be  unnecessary.  He  knows  what  he  wants,  how 
much  it  will  cost,  and  all  he  has  to  decide  is  where  he  will  spend 
his  money,  and  what  goods  he  will  buy.  As  much  for  his  guidance 
as  for  that  of  the  new  man  coming  into  the  business,  this  article  is 
written  in  a  simple  informative  way,  and  contains  hints  on  all  the 
latest  appliances  in  the  market  at  the  moment  of  writing.  The 
advice  it  contains  may  be  relied  upon  as  the  expression  of  dis- 
interested and  unbiassed  opinion  by  the  writer,  whose  only  object 
is  to  serve  the  exhibitor  to  the  best  of  his  ability.  As  proof  of  the 
entire  freedom  which  is  accorded  his  views  in  these  columns,  it 
should  be  stated  emphatically  that  no  goods  are  recommended 
because  they  are  advertised  in  The  Cinema  ;  on  the  other  hand, 
many  firms  receive  favourable  mention  for  their  specialities  who  do 
not  and  have  not  advertised  with  us,  and  have  even  declined  our 
invitation  to  do  so. 

Disinterested  Recommendation. 

The  exhibitor  may  therefore  feel  absolute  confidence  in  ordering 
goods  mentioned  in  this  issue,  and  we  wish  to  clearly  state  that 
when  we  recommend  any  particular  article  in  these  columns,  we  do 
so  because  we  believe  we  are  recommending  the  goods  that  will 
best  answer  the  particular  requirements  of  the  overseas  buyer.- 

One  further  point  It  is  always  well  to  remember  that  when  one 
buys  from  a  firm  of  established  reputation,  the  name  of  the  firm 
is  behind  the  goods,  and  stands  guarantee  for  all  that  is  claimed 
for  them.  Therefore  the  wise  man  always  buys  from  firms  he 
knows  something  about,  and  this  is  all  the  more  important  where 
he  is  situated  at  such  a  distance  that  disappointment  often  means 
delay,  and  delay  means  loss  of  money. 

Equipping  the  Theatre. 

Now  for  a  few  words  about  the  theatre  itself,  and  its  multifarious 
divisions  and  activities.  A  cinema  theatre  is  divided  into  three  or 
four  important  administrativedivisions.  We  have  the  entrance  lobby 
and  the  auditorium  ;  these  are  for  the  public.  The  operating  box 
and  film  room,  pay-box  and  office  are  for  the  staff  and  manage- 
ment. In  that  section  of  the  building  devoted  to  the  interests  of 
the  public,  we  have  a  variety  of  points  to  consider.     The  object  is 

THE  GREAT  MOMENT  has  come  for  you  to  book  that 
sensational  film,  "GIPSY  BLOOD,"  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No. 


to  attract  patrons,  therefore  their  comfort  must  be  studied.  To  this- 
comfort  everything  in  the  management  of  a  hall  contributes.  The 
decorations  must  be  artistic  and  harmonious.  This  particularly 
applies  to  the  exterior  and  lobby.  Posters  must  be  shown  to  the  best 
advantage  and  programme  boards  so  placed  as  to  catch  the  eye  of 
the  passer-by  and  lure  them  to  the  pay-box.  The  whole  appear- 
ance of  the  lobby  should  be  calculated  out  to  attract  and  charm. 
The  pay-box  must  be  comfortably'  fitted,  and  it  is  well  to  see  that 
it  is  properly  ventilated,  being  neither  too  hot  nor  too  cold.  The 
best  system  of  checking  is  produced  by  using  a  ticket  or  check 
issuer — great  care  must  be  exercised  to  see  that  the  checking  of 
the  receipts  is  thorough.  The  official  in  receipt  of  custom  must  be 
sharp  and  business-like  and  quick  in  giving  change  and  "  spotting  " 
bad  coins,  and  should  also  be  responsible  for  handing  in  the  accounts 
to  the  manager  at  the  end  of  the  day. 

The  Auditorium. 

Once  past  the  pay-box  we  arrive  at  the  auditorium,  which,  after 
all,  is  the  principal  part  of  the  building  from  the  management  point 
of  view,  as  it  is  here  that  revenue  is  earned.  Particular  care  there- 
fore must  be  taken  to  see  that  everything  is  done  conducive  to  the 
comfort  and  safety  of  the  audience.  A  concrete  floor  is  the  ideal 
thing  to  use  in  tropical  climes,  as  wood  soon  becomes  rotten  and 
ant-eaten.  In  some  parts  carpets  may  be  advantageously  used  for 
covering  the  gangways  ;  in  others,  far  the  healthiest  from  a  sanitary 
point  of  view,  and  most  economical  is  rush  matting,  which  can  be 
quickly  and  easily  moved  and  cleaned.  Special  attention  must  be 
paid  to  the  question  of  ventilation,  otherwise  the  air  would  soon 
become  vitiated  and  unwholesome.  The  erection  of  a  compara- 
tively few  ventilation  fans  at  convenient  points  will  obviate  this, 
and  win  the  regard  of  countless  patrons. 

Make  your  Audience  Comfortable. 

Bare  walls  have  an  uninviting  look.  By  the  exercise  of  a  little 
taste  they  can  be  made  to  look  most  attractive.  Pictorial  panels 
are  effective,  and  stencilling,  provided  it  is  well  done,  has  the 
advantage  of  being  cheap.  Then  we  come  to  the  all-important 
question  of  seating.  Even  in  England  too  little  attention  has  been 
paid  to  the  matter  of  seating  accommodation  in  the  past,  and  yet  it  is 
perhaps  one  of  the  most  vital  points  in  the  whole  construction  of  a 
cinematograph  theatre,  if  it  is  to  be  a  success.  Completely  satisfy 
your  patrons  is  surely  a  platitude,  but  every  manager  would  do 
well  to  keep  these  words  always  writ  large  over  the  desk  in  his 
office.  It  means  the  difference  between  success  and  failure. 
Therefore  see  to  it  that  your  audience  has  comfortable  seats  to  sit 
upon.  Good  seats  are  cheap,  and  surely  there  is  a  big  enough 
selection  in  the  market  from  which  to  choose. 

Other  Points  to  Remember. 

Other  points  to  remember  in  the  auditorium  are  not  only  the 
provision  of  a  sufficient  number  of  exits  to  comply  with  official 
requirements,  but  also  lights  indicating  their  whereabouts. 
Particular  care  should  be  taken  when  examining  the  plans  for  the 
building  to  ensure  a  sufficient  proscenium  opening  and  depth  of 
stage.  This  is  most  important,  as  most  cinematograph  theatre 
proprietors  at  some  time  or  another  will  find  the  need  for  good 
stage  accommodation  for  meetings  or  variety  shows,  altogether 
apart  from  the  exhibition  of  pictures.  It  would  also  be  advisable 
to  provide  two  or  three  good  dressing-rooms  at  the  back  of  the 
stage,  and  leave  sufficient  room  between  the  stage  and  the  front 
row  of  seat    for  a  small  orchestra  or  piano. 

The  Operating  Box. 

The  operating  box  is  the  heart  of  the  theatre,  for  in  it  is  con- 
tained the  whole  of  the  complex  machinery  necessary  to  the  pro- 
duction of  a  picture  on  the  screen.  The  box  should  be  a  fire-proof 
chamber  of  suitable  size  to  accommodate  the  whole  of  the  electric 
gear,  the  projector,  the  rewinder,  and  all  necessary  small  gear  and 
repair  kit.  Too  small  a  room  hampers  the  operator  and  slows 
down  the  speed  of  the  show.  From  the  conduit,  where  the  electric 
leads  enter  from  the  street,  they  go  direct  to  the  D.  P.  switch.    This 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


May,  i 91 2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


is  of  necessity  of  the  enclosed  type  owing  to  the  risk  of  fire,  and  it 
is  a  sound  maxim  to  keep  celluloid  films  well  away  fiom  all  electrical 
fittings — particularly  the  variable  resistance.  From  the  main  switch 
the  current  is  fed  to  the  switch  board,  where  it  flows  through  the 
main  fuses— also  enclosed  type— and  thence  goes  to  the  resistance 
and  arc  circuits.  From  the  board  also  radiate  the  small  subsidiary 
circuits  for  lighting,  driving  fans,  &c.  The  arc  leads  properly 
enclosed  in  conduit  or  sheathing  are  taken  straight  to  the  lantern 
and  carried  well  out  of  the  way  of  tne  films,  join  direct  to  the 
asbestos  braided  leads  on  the  arc. 

The  Projector. 

All  subsidiary  circuits  such  as  lighting,  motor,  auditorium 
lighting,  &c  ,  are  connected  on  the  live  side  of  the  resistance,  and 
have  each  their  separate  switch  and  fuse  settings.  The  auditorium 
circuit  is  as  a  rule  under  control  from  the  pay-box  as  well,  and  is 
usually  connected  direct  with  the  street  lighting  current  in  order  to 
avoid  the  danger  of  the  whole  hall  being  thrown  into  darkness 
should  a  breakdown  occur  in  the  operating  box.  The  projector 
occupies  the  centre  of  the  room  and  there  should  be  plenty  of 
space  between  the  re-winding  bench  and  film  storage  racks  to  allow 
the  operator  free  access  to  all  parts  of  his  machine.      On  the  re- 


winding bench  should  be  kept  the  film  mender  and  small  repair 
accessories.  All  big  repairs  and  the  unpacking  of  films  should  be 
done  outside  the  box,  which  should  always  be  kept  neat  and  free 
from  accumulations  of  rubbish,  such  as  old  carbon  ends  and  bits  of 
film. 

Secret  of  Good  Running. 

Cleaning  kit,  such  as  dusters  and  rags,  lubricating  oil,  leathers, 
&c,  for  the  care  of  the  projector,  has  also  to  be  kept  on  hand. 
The  secret  of  the  good  running  of  a  machine  is  care  and  cleanliness. 
Dirt  and  accumulations  from  old  films  should  always  be  carefully 
wiped  off  th^  gate,  sprockets,  gears  and  pinions  kept  well  oiled,  but 
free  of  surplus  exudation,  and  the  whole  machine  in  good 
condition.  At  the  first  sign  of  "  running  hard  "  give  the  machine 
a  thorough  cleaning.  Take  it  apart,  clean  all  bearings  and  bushes 
with  a  clean  oiled  rag,  and  all  gear  and  sprocket  teeth  with  a 
cleaning  brush.  Erect  it  clean  and  free  of  old  oil  and  it  will 
probably  run  sweetly  again. 

Below  are  full  details  of  the  various  apparatus  necessary  to  the 
proper  equipment  of  a  theatre,  written  from  data  supplied  by  the 
respective  firms 


THE    HEPWORTH    MANUFACTURING 
CO.,  LTD., 

2,   Denman  Street,  Piccadilly  Circus,  W. 

The  name  of  Hepworth  is  now  known  wherever  films  are  shown, 
and  as  a  keen,  very-much-alive  business  organisation  its  directors 
are  ever  on  the  look  out  for  new  devices  that  will  add  to  the 
effectiveness  of  their  stock  from  the  showman's  point  of  view.  A 
clever  and  most  useful  apparatus  in  conjunction  with  pictures  is 
the  Vivaphone.  This  instrument  will  turn  a  dull  show  into  a 
live  one  in  no  time,  and  adds  in  the  most  extraordinary  way  to  the 
general  effectiveness  of  the  pictures.  It  enables  the  showman  to 
put  on  first-class  singing  pictures,  and  as  the  synchronisation  is 
perfect  the  illusion  is  complete.  The  Vivaphone  can  be  fitted  to 
any  make  of  projector,  and  wherever  it  is  introduced  it  affords  just 
the  most  welcome  break  in  the  programme,  which  ensures  for  it  a 
whole-hearted  popularity. 

The  Vivaphone  Synchroniser  is,  broadly  speaking,  a  very 
delicate  and  quickly  responsive  signalling  apparatus  by  which  the 
operator  of  a  hand  or  motnr  driven  cinematograph  may  keep  in 
perfect  svnchronism  with  a  distant  gramophone.  Simply  described, 
the  Synchroniser  consists  of  an  indicating  needle  controlled  by  two 
electro-magnets,  one  of  which  is  electrically  connected  with  the 
gramophone  and  tends  to  pull  the  needle  one  way,  while  the  other 
is  similarly  connected  with  the  cinematograph  and  tends  to  pull  it 
the  other  way.  When  the  two  machines  are  working  synchronously 
the  pull  is  equal  on  either  side,  and  the  hand  maintains  its 
upright  position.  If  synchronism  be  lost  the  obliquity  of  the  hand 
is  the  measure  of  the  amount  of  retardation  or  acceleration. 
Synchronism  may  then  be  regained  by  speeding  up  or  slowing 
down  as  the  case  may  be  until  the  needle  resumes  the  upright 
position.  The  indications  are  made  more  delicate  and  much  more 
easily  read  by  the  fact  that  to  either  side  of  the  needle  is  attached 
a  tiny  red  and  green  window.  In  the  normal  upright  position  the 
needle  itsel'  covers  a  narrow  slot  through  which  a  beam  of  light  in 
the  apparatus  is  shining.  Any  deflection  of  the  needle  to  either 
side  brings  one  or  other  coloured  window  in  front  of  this  slot  and 
gives  a  green  or  red  flash  of  light  to  the  operator.  This  is 
infinitely  more  quickly  noticeable  than  would  be  the  deflection  of 
the  needle  itself,  and  the  synchronism  obtained  is  correspondingly 
more  exact.  Besides  the  Synchroniser  the  apparatus  consists  of  a 
contact-making  device  for  the  cinematograph  and  another  for  the 
gramophone  These,  however,  do  not  necessitate  any  special 
attachments.  The  commutator  for  the  cinematograph  is  made  in 
one  piece  with  the  hand'e,  and  it  suffices  to  replace  the  ordinary 
handle  supplied  with  the  machine  by  this  special  handle  to  complete 
the  connection  to  the  projector.  The  arrangement  at  the 
gramophone  end  is,  if  possible,  more  simple  still,  for  the  commu- 
tator is  merely  an  appliance  which  stands  upon  the  case  of  the 
gramophone  and  engages  with  the  slot  in  the  centre  pin.  The 
connections  between  the  two  commutators  and  the  Synchroniser 
are  made  by  ordinary  double  bell-wire,  or,  if  preferred,  ordinary 
electric-light  "  flexible."  The  electricity  is  supplied  by  an  ordinary 
ignition  accumulator  such  as  can  be  obtained  in  any  town,  and 
can  be  as  easily  re-charged. 

The  chief  advantages  of  the  Vivaphone  are  perfect  synchronism 
and  adaptability.  It  is  so  simple  that  any  operator  can  instal  and 
work  the  apparatus  in  a  few  minutes  without  previous  practice. 

THE  GREAT  MOMENT  has  come  for  you  to  book  that 
sensational  film,  "GIPSY  BLOOD,"  Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  3. 


WILLIAMSON    KINEMATOGRAPH    CO., 
LTD. 

28,   Denmark  Street,   Charing  Cross  Road,  W.C. 

This  firm  has  one  of  the  most  completely  equipped  factories  in 
the  trade,  and  having  been  actual  makers  of  films  of  the  first  rank 
for  twelve  years,  none  can  know  better  what  is  actually  required 
by  the  exhibitor  in  the  way  of  perfect  camera,  printer,  and 
perforator.  These  are  specialities  of  the  firm,  and  used  in  com- 
bination, absolute  accuracy  and  steadiness  of  the  picture  upon  the 
screen  can  be  guaranteed.  This  is  what  every  exhibitor  looks  for. 
The  most  important  machine  necessary  for  film  making  is  the 
perforator.  The  Williamson  perforator  is  not  only  absolutely 
accurate  but  it  is  also  thoroughly  reliable,  and  maybe  worked  with 
perfect  safety  at  400  revolutions  per  minute.  The  perlection  of 
these  results  is  mainly  due  to  the  general  desigr  of  the  machine. 
The  work  of  the  carrying-forward  movement  is  always  even 
against  the  spring  guide  gate  ;  there  is  no  tug  backwards  from  the 
feeding  roll,  nor  forward  from  the  re-wind.  There  are  no  cams  or 
working  parts  below  the  level  of  the  film  to  pick  up  dust  or 
punchings  and  alter  the  pitch.  The  punchings  are  carried  away 
through  the  baseboard.  The  only  adjustments  necessary  or  per- 
missible are  in  the  guide  gate,  for  width,  and  the  feeding  loop, 
which  can  be  adjusted  while  the  machine  is  running.  The  films 
are  perforated  two  at  a  time,  face  to  face,  and  re-wound,  thus 
avoiding  rubbing  of  the  sensitive  surface  which  must  occur  when 
the  films  are  passed  through  singly,  or  run  loose  into  a  receptacle 
and  re-wound  afterwards.  The  whole  apparatus  is  fitted  with  a 
polished  mahogany  board,  but  it  is  important  to  notice  that  the 
essential  working  parts  are  screwed  to  a  solid  iron  base  plate,  thus 
securing  that  no  bending  or  warping  of  the  mahogany  board  will 
affect  the  perfect  alignment.  This  machine  has  been  in  regular 
use  in  many  cinematograph  firms  for  over  three  years. 

Messrs.  Williamson  claim  for  their  Patent  Printing  Machine 
that  in  its  complete  form  every  requirement  is  rontained  within  an 
easily  movable  cabinet,  which  needs  only  connecting  to  an  electric 
wall  plug.  The  apparatus  is  divided  into  two  compartments.  The 
lower  division  contains  a  ^th  h.p.  motor,  and  a  system  of  cone 
pulleys  by  which  your  speeds  may  be  obtained.  Each  of  these  four 
speeds  is  further  controlled  by  a  regulating  switch  giving  six  speeds. 
The  upper  compartment  is  lined  with  asbestos,  and  contains  the 
lamp.  This  is  a  50  c.p.  electric  lamp  with  grid  filament  known  as 
the  focus  lamp.  The  patent  claw  movement  ensures  perfect  registra- 
tion. On  the  spindle  upon  which  this  movement  is  mounted  is  a  bevel 
wheel  which  drives  the  top  and  bottom  sprocketts  through  a  vertical 
spindle.  These  two  sprocketts  maintain  a  constant  loop  at  the  top 
and  bottom  of  the  gate.  The  top  sprockettis  driven  through  a  free 
wheel  which  facilitates  threading  up.  The  side-hinged  gate  gives 
perfect  contact,  even  pressure,  exact  side  guiding,  and  screens  the 
light  from  the  room.  A  red  light  cut-off  behind  the  film  is  operated 
by  a  neat  lever.  The  mask  is  moved  by  a  rack  and  pinion.  The 
top  spools  are  provided  with  spring  flaps  of  even  tension,  to  prevent 
the  film  unwinding  except  when  pulled  by  the  feeding  sprockett. 
The  bottom  spools  re-wind  both  positive  and  negative  and  are  pro- 
vided with  sliding  flanges  to  facilitate  the  removal  of  the  rolls. 

The  Williamson  Camera  de  Luxe  is  made  throughout  in  teak 
wood,  and  is  absolutely  "  climate-proof."  The  result  of  years  of 
experiment  in  this  class  of  work,   it  is  unequalled  for  constant  and 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


8 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  191 2. 


rough  usage,  and  it  is  particularly  adapted  for  the  tropics.  The 
sides  of  the  case  are  strengthened  with  brass  binding  sunk  flush 
with  the  wood  ;  all  the  corners  of  the  case  and  doors  are  protected 
with  brass,  which  also  add  considerably  to  the  appearance  and 
make  a  very  smart  finish.  A  50  m/m  Zeiss  Tessar  lens  in  rack 
mount  is  fitted  as  standard,  but  any  other  lens  can  be  supplied  at 
maker's  prices,  with  an  additional  15s.  for  fitting  into  the  adapting 
tubes  with  sun-shield  and  knurled  flange  for  working  the  iris 
diaphragm.  The  speed-indicator  is  absolutely  reliable,  and  can  be 
read  at  a  glance,  the  hand  being  so  balanced  that  there  is  no 
"quivering"  at  any  speed.  Measurer,  film  punch,  arrangement 
for  eight  pictures  and  one  picture  per  turn  of  handle,  etc.  The 
film  can  be  reversed  and  re-wound  into  the  top  box  (for  trick  film), 
and  brass  protecting  rings  are  placed  on  the  top  and  bottom  of  the 
camera  for  the  stand.  The  detachable  box  finder  slides  on  to  side 
of  camera  with  a  wedge  fitting.  It  also  fits  inside  the  camera  for 
travelling.  Turning  handle,  film  masks,  spare  re-winding  belt, 
tools,  etc.,  fit  inside  the  door  on  left  side.  Two  film  boxes  are 
supplied  with  each  camera,  to  hold  330  feet  of  film. 


NEW    CENTURY   FILM    SERVICE    LTD. 

2-4,  Quebec  Street,  Leeds. 

One  of  the  most  enterprising  firms  in  the  business.     In  addition 
to     a   complete    film     hire    service,    they 

specialise  in  cinematograph  requisites  of      m 

every  kind.  Their  "  Kalee  "  projector 
works  on  the  Maltese  Cross  piinciple. 
The  body  of  the  mechanism  is  made  of 
cast-iron,  stove  enamelled  black;  the 
casting  carries  the  main  bearings,  which 
are  fitted  with  dust-proof  caps  and  oil 
filters.  The  mechanism  is  provided  with 
an  automatic  cut-off  actuated  by  gover- 
nors inside  the  fly-wheel,  which  is 
thoroughly  reliable.  The  advantage  of 
placing  the  governors  inside  the  rim  of 
the  pulley  is  that  in  this  position  they  are 
entirely  protected,  and  very  unlikely  to 
be  damaged  in  any  way.  All  the  gears 
of  the  machine  are  cut  from  solid  gun- 
metal  or  steel,  those  of  the  latter  material 
being  specially  hardened.  The  spool 
arms  are  made  of  cast-iron,  enamelled 
black,  the  top  arm  being  removable, 
while  the  take-up  arm  folds  into  the  body 
of  the  machine,  thus  facilitating  matters 
in  connection  with  transport.  The  take- 
up  is  arranged  with  bevel  gear,  and  the 
friction  can  be  readily  adjusted  by  means 
of  a  knurled  nut  provided  for  the  purpose. 
This  system  of  re-wind  is  admitted  to  be 
vastly  superior  to  the  antiquated  spiral 
belt  or  bicycle  chain  arrangement,  and  the  "" 
method  of  adjusting  the  friction  makes  the 

re-wind  regular  when  any  amount  of  film  is  on  the  spool.  The 
driving-wheel  has  been  made  heavier  than  is  usual  with  this  class 
of  machine,  thus  arranging  a  better  balance  and  enabling  the  machine 
to  be  worked  with  the  greatest  ease  by  hand,  a  quality  which 
is  conspicuous  by  its  absence  from  most  of  the  Maltese  Cross 
projectors  at  present  on  the  market.  Between  the  condenser  cone  and 
the  mechanism  a  steel  shield  is  provided  to  prevent  the  film  by  any 
means  running  against  the  lantern  body,  a  device  which  has  found 
great  favour  among  the  exhibitors  who  are  already  using  this 
machine.  The  spool  boxes  are  made  of  mild  steel,  stove  enamelled  ; 
the  doors  are  carried  on  substantial  hinges,  and  fasten  by  strong 
catches.  The  fireproof  film  traps  are  made  of  gun  metal  hinged 
on  the  far  side  to  facilitate  threading  of  the  film.  Grooved 
rollers  are  provided  at  each  end  of  the  trap,  and  the  sides  of  the 
channel  through  the  trap  are  raised,  so  that  the  face  of  the  film  does 
not  make  contact  in  any  way  in  its  passage  from  the  spool  to  the 
machine,  and  so  runs  no  risk  of  being  scratched  or  broken. 
Particular  attention  has  been  paid  to  the  Maltese  Cross,  the 
most  important  part  of  the  machine.  The  cross  locking  ring 
and  pin  a  e  constructed  from  specially  tempered  steel.  The  first 
named  is  not  fixed  on  separately  as  is  generally  the  case,  but  the 
whole  of  the  shaft  on  which  is  cut  the  pinion  is  one  solid  piece  of 
metal,  and  is  worked  up  in  the  same  careful  and  accurate  manner 


ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE  NOTE. 

"WE    HAVE    HAD 
SUFFICIENT    REPLIES." 


ELECTRIC     PAVILIONS.     LTD., 

write  : — 

"  Please  discontinue  our 
Advertisement  in  '  THE 
CINEMA,' as  we  have  had 
sufficient  replies,  and  have 
sold  the  machine." 

(Signed)  I 


April  16th.  1912. 


as  the  cross  itself.  The  latter,  together  with  the  cross  locking 
ring,  is  carried  in  an  ingeniously  devised  oil-bath,  so  that  the  cross 
is  continually  running  in  oil,  a  precaution  which  would  appear  to 
absolutely  prevent  wear. 

The  shutter  is  worked  on  the  recently  discovered  two  revolutions 
per  picture  principle,  which  eliminates  flicker,  and  is  practically 
exclusive  to  the  "Kalee"  Projector.  The  shutter  is  entirely  en- 
closed, although  it  can  be  very  easily  got  at  for  adjustment,  and 
there  is  no  possibility  of  its  being  broken  while  in  use.  The  masking 
device  is  so  arranged  that  the  shutter  moves  with  the  gate,  so 
that  "ghosts"  on  the  screen  are  an  impossibility.  The  film  gate 
is  made  of  enamelled  gun-metal,  the  trap  being  steel-faced,  and 
instead  of  the  tension  being  actuated  by  flat  springs  on  each  side, 
the  film  is  held  in  position  by  spiral  springs,  which  can  be 
accurately  adjusted  by  means  of  small  milled  knobs.  This  method 
of  tension  provides  that  the  pressure  on  each  side  of  the  film  is 
perfectly  uniform,  and  any  side-play  is  absolutely  prevented.  The 
lantern  lens  is  carried  on  a  separately  adjusted  arm  over  the 
balance  wheel,  that  is  on  the  far  side  from  the  operator,  so  that  his 
manipulation  of  the  cinematograph  mechanism  is  in  no  way 
impeded  when  slides  are  not  being  shown  and  films  are  in  use. 
Another  advantage  of  this  attachment  being  placed  on  the  far  side 
of  the  mechanism  is  that  when  changing  spools  a  slide  can  be 
shown,  while  the  light  is  entirely  removed  from  the  film  gate. 
The  lantern  body  is  constructed  of  blued  steel  held  together  by  a 
strong  angle-iron  trame.  The  door 
consists  of  the  whole  side  of  the  body, 
thus  allowing  perfect  freedom  for  re- 
carboning  and  adjustment  of  the  arc 
lamp.  The  hinges  are  substantially 
made  of  brass.  The  front  of  the 
lantern  body  is  solidly  built,  the 
slide  carrier  being  held  in  position  by 
four  milled  brass  screws.  The  lantern 
body  is  provided  with  an  asbestos  lining 
which  prevents  it  becoming  too  hot  to 
be  pleasant  when  in  use.  The  baseboard 
is  a  substantial  iron  casting.  The  slide 
carrier  is  of  brass,  highly  finished,  and 
fitted  with  three  apertures,  so  that  when 
same  is  withdrawn  to  the  central  position 
allowing  the  light  to  pass  to  the  gate,  and 
two  metal  shields  are  placed  in  the  side 
openings,  an  effective  cut-oft  is  provided 
in  case  of  anything  going  wrong,  whether 
the  operator  pushes  the  slide  carrier  in  or 
pulls  it  out.  The  condenser  is  carried  in  a 
brass  frame  to  which  is  attached  a  fibre 
handle.  It  can  be  removed,  however  hot 
it  may  be,  and  although  it  remains  firmly 
in  position  can  be  lifted  out  and  replaced 
in  a  few  seconds.  The  condenser  is  fitted 
outside  the  lantern  body,  a  precaution 
which  is  very  useful,  and  owing  to  iis 
being  kept  cooler  than  if  placed  inside 
the  body,  obviates  breakage  of  lenses. 
Another  feature  of  this  condenser  cell  is  the  fact  that  in  changing 
lenses  no  screwing  is  necessary,  the  glasses  being  simply  hell 
in  position  by  a  clip  which  can  be  released  by  a  simple  pressure 
of  the  fingers. 


DAVIS. 


Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swing,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  4. 


JURY'S    KINE    SUPPLIES,    LTD. 

7a,     Upper    St.     Martin's    Lane,     London,     W.C. 

ESSRS.  Jury's  Imperial  Projector  is  built  of  the  finest 
material  by  British  craftsmen  and  is  a  triumph  of  good 
design  and  workmanship.  The  lamp  house  is  composed 
of  best  quality  Russian  iron,  with  heavy  cast-iron  front 
and  frame  work.  The  two  doors  open  full  side  of  the 
lamp  house  to  allow  of  ease  in  adjusting  the  arc. 
Large  sight  glass  of  new  and  novel  design.  Exterior  condenser 
mount  and  heavy  unbreakable  condenser  cell.  The  lamp  house  is 
mounted  on  a  sliding  base  and  has  check  screws,  and  allows  for 
ample  adjustment  both  for  fo'  ward  and  backward,  and  side  to  side 
movements.  The  top  of  the  lamp  house  being  hinged  allows  for 
same  to  be  opened  right  back,  leaving  top  exposed,  while  the 
condenser  is  of  the  well-known  Jury  loose  pocket  type. 

The  projector  is  of  entirely  new  and  novel  design,  built  in 
splendid  proportions  and  of  correct  optical  and  mechanical  lines. 
To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOVE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role. 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


May,   191 2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


The  gate  is  of  heavy  steel,  with  a  very  live  tension  spring  fitting, 
and  has  a  patent  top  guide  roll  which  is  made  on  a  tapered 
flange.  This  mode  of  guiding  the  film  into  the  gate  entirely 
obviates  all  lateral  movement  on  the  film  and  is  a  remarkable 
factor  in  securing  rock  steady  projection.  The  movement  is  of 
the  Maltese  cross  type,  enclosed  entirely  in  an  oil  bath.  The 
M.C.  spindle  is  of  hard  tool  steel  and  runs  in  phosphor  bronze 
bsarings.  These  bearings  for  the  M  C.  movement  are  arranged 
on  an  eccentric  adjustment,  so  that  the  least  slackness  on  the  M.C. 
sprocket  can  be  immediately  taken  up  by  a  very  ingenious  pair  of 
adjusting  heads.  The  Maltese  cross  and  cam  are  composed  of  a 
special  grade  of  hard  silver  steel  and  are  practically  un wearable. 
There  are  two  screws  fitted  to  face  of  M.C.  oil  bath  which  allow 
for  emptying  the  spent  oil  from  bath  by  taking  out  the  bottom 
screw  and  replenishing  with  new  oil  by  taking  out  the  top  screw 
and  filling  bath  from  oil  can.  The  sprockets  are  cut  from  steel 
rod  and  are  of  large  diameter.  The  recessed  presser  rolls  are 
double  and  working  freely  on  a  central  bearing,  fit  themselves  to 
the  contour  of  the  sprocket,  holding  the  film  by  the  extreme 
margin  only  in  its  correct  position.  The  spool  boxes  are  composed 
of  pressed  sheet  steel  and  allow  of  ample  room  for  readily  detach- 
ing or  attaching  spools.  The  gears  are  cut  from  steel  and 
gunmetal  and  are  enclosed  in  an  aluminium  case,  thus  preventing 
dust  and  grit  from  clogging  the  working  surfaces,  and  greatly 
adding  to  the  life  of  the  machine. 

Messrs.  Jury  are,  we  understand,  about  to  produce  a  new 
machine,  the  Model  B,  which  will  have  a  series  of  new  features. 
The  firm  produce  every  possible  requisite  for  the  electric  theatre 
owner,  and  supply  complete  outfits  for  film-producing  studio 
equipments,  such  as  printing  machines,  perforators  and  cleansers, 
rotary  drying  drums  arc  lamps,  etc.  Among  their  electrical 
equipment,  attention  should  be  paid  to  their  portable  generator 
sets,  enclose  J  switches,  transformers,  and  auto-converters,  and 
they  make  a  special  feature  of  collapsible  iron  operators'  rooms, 
storage  boxes,   and    apparatus   for    the   colonies. 


shoul  1  be  applied  in  a  spray,  and  of  such  a  kind  as  to 
re-oxygenate  the  air,  and  ab-orb  all  smoke  and  other  impurities. 
One  of  the  best  and  cheapest  disinfectants  for  this  purpose  is 
"Piner-lin,"  which  is  claimed  by  its  makers  to  be  the  last  word 
in  hygiene  as  supplied  to  purification  of  the  air  by  spray- 
ing. It  i->  absolutely  free  from  coal  tar,  is  made  from  formaldehyde, 
pine  oil,  etc,  and  is  the  most  valuable,  powerful  and  efficient 
disinfectant  known  to  chemistry,  and  is  deadly  to  germs  and 
bacteria.  Tnp  great  antiseptic  disinfectant  powers  of  "  Piner-lin  " 
make  it  very  valuable  as  a  preventive  against  influenza,  catarrh, 
etc.  "  Piner-lin  "  has  also  properties  which,  in  solution,  when 
sprayed  into  the  air  give  off  free  ozone  and  oxygen,  take  away  all 
the  carbonic  acid  gas,  smoke,  and  other  impuriiies,  and  render  the 
atmosphere  sweet,  fresh,  cool,  and  very  agreeable.  "Piner-lin" 
when  sprayed  in  the  air  is  a  deadly  enemy  to  air  germs.  After  a 
room  has  been  swept  out  and  dusted,  the  dust  itself  is  cleared 
away,  but  the  germs  which  have  been  developing  in  that  dust  have 
only  been  disturbed,  and  are  floating  about  in  the  air  at  all  levels, 
and  are  left  to  settle  again.  This  is  the  time  "  Piner-lin  "  is 
wanted  to  destroy  all  living  germs. 

Another  speciality  of  this  firm  is  I.G.  nic  Block,  the  cheapest 
disinfectant  on  the  market.  Made  in  the  form  of  a  block  from 
extract  of  Norwegian  pine,  eucalyptus,  and  thymol,  it  produces  a 
gallon  of  disenfectant  for  a  penny. 


THE    PINER-LIN   CO., 

Fishponds,  Bristol. 

In     the     interest     of    hygiene    every    theatre  and 
bs  disinfected   during  each  performance. 


hall    should 
The   disinfectant   used 


H.  LAZARUS    AND    SON,    LTD., 

21,   Great  Eastern  Street,   E.C. 

This  firm  makes  a  specially  of  seating  of  all  kinds  for  theatres, 
town  halls,  cinematograph  theatres,  etc.  They  have  been  in  the 
business  for  upwards  of  thirty  years,  and  their  patent  tip-up 
automatic  chairs  are  used  in  many  of  the  principal  theatres  in 
London  and  the  provinces,  and  on  the  Continent,  in  India,  and 
Souih  Africa.  To  withstand  climatic  conditions  Messrs.  Lazarus 
and  Son  specialise  a  chair  covering,  "Pegamoid,"  which  is  an 
exact  imitation  of  morocco  leather,  and  is  the  same  price  as  velvet. 
This  firm  also  provide  furniture  of  all  kinds  for  private  boxes, 
foyers,  tea-rooms,  etc.,  and  are  prepared  to  quote  prices  for 
tableaux  curtains  of  the  simplest  or  most  elaborate  description. 


F.  FARRELL  &  Co.,  Ltd., 


CINEMATOGRAPH  THEATRE  BUILDERS. 


STRUCTURAL  ALTERATIONS   AND   REDECORATION 

SCHEMES    CARRIED    OUT    WITHOUT    INTERFERING 

WITH    DAILY    PERFORMANCES. 


We  make  it  our  business  to  know  all  the 
new  regulations  issued  by  the  Authorities. 


Estimates  Free — 

Town,  Country,  or  Abroad. 


CORRESPONDENCE  EN  TOUTES  LANGUES. 


Telegraphic  Addres  : 
"  Farrellize,  London." 


'Phone : 
7018  P.O.  Hampstead 


9,  Fleet  Road, 
Hampstead,  N.W. 

SPECIAL    TERMS    TO    RELIABLE    FIRMS. 


10 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   1912. 


MEN     OF     THE     MOMENT 

IN    THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    WORLD. 

No.   IV. Mr.  James  Williamson,  of  the  Williamson   Kinematograph  Company,    Limited. 


the 


FTER  chatting  for  a  few  minutes  with  Mr.  James 
Williamson,  the  managing  director  of  the  Williamson 
Kinematograph  Company,  one  realises  how  far  the 
industry  has  travelled  since  the  early  days  when 
moving  pictures  first  assumed  practical  form.  As  a 
malter  of  fact,  I  believe  I  am  right  in  saying  that  since 
retirement  of  Mr.  Paul,  Mr.  Williamson  is  now  the  only  man 
in  the  trade  who  was  engaged  in  the  production  of  films  in  those 
early  days.  It  is,  therefore,  only  natural  that  his  recollections  of 
those  early  days,  when  no  one  dreamed  of  the  vast  possibilities 
which  the  future  held  for  the  moving  picture,  are  full  of  interest. 

Twenty-six  years  ago. 

"My  start?  I  must  go  away  back  to  the  eighties— twenty-s'x 
years  ago  to  be  exact — when  I  went  into  business  ? s  a  chemist  in 
Brighton.  That  was  long  before  animated  pictures,  as  we  know 
them  today,  were  even  thought  of.  I  took  up  photography  as  an 
additional  branch  of  the  business,  but  became  so  interested  in  it 
that  eventually  my  spare  time  was  largely  devoted  to  it  as  a  hobby. 
I  started  the  Hove  Camera  Club,  and  became  its  first  secretary, 
and  this  ultimately  led  to  my  connection  with  the  cinematograph 
industry — I  mean,  of  course,  in  an  indirect  way. 

"Part  of  my  business  as  secretary  of  the  Hove  Camera  Club 
was  to  introduce  anything  new  that  came  along,  and  in  this  way  I 
was  the  first  to  give  a  demonstration  in  X  Rays  in  Brighton.  In 
the  autumn  of  1896  I  bought  a  Wrench  projector  and  about  half 
a  dozen  short  films,  and  showed  these  to  the  members  of  the 
Camera  Club.  But  'how  is  it  done?  '  everybody  wanted  to 
know,  and  I  set  about  to  find  out.  In  those  days  there 
were  no  trade  papers  with  advertisements  of  cameras,  &c.  Those 
who  had  them  were  very  careful  of  them  and  watched  them  with 
jealous  eyes.  The  only  one  I  could  learn  about  was  one  by 
Messrs.  Lumiere  at  about  /ioo,  sold  by  Mes'rs.  Fuerst 
Bros.  But  this  was  not  my  price.  During  that  winter  I 
managed  to  fix  up  the  Wrench  projector  in  a  box  in  such  a  way 
that  I  succeeded  in  taking  pictures  with  it.  I  was  rather  proud 
of  this  achievement,  but  it  was  obviously  only  a  makeshift.  About 
this  time  pictures  were  being  made  in  Brighton  by  Mr.  Esme 
Collings,  a  photographer  who  had  over  his  doer  '  formerly  partner 
with  Mr.  W.  Frieze  Greene,'  and  Mr.  Collings  made  use  of  St. 
Ann's  Well  and  Wild  Garden  c'ose  by  for  producing  some  of  his 
pictures.  The  lessee  of  this  pleasure  garden  was  Mr.  G.  A.  Smith, 
and  I  became  acquainted  with  him  as  a  customer  for  chemicals 
and  so  found  that  he  too  was  experimenting  with  the  kinemato- 
graph. 

First  Rotary  Perforator. 

"  Although  I  considered  myself  a  fairly  expert  photographer 
in  those  days,  Mr.  Smith  who  had  never  taken  a  photograph 
before  went  far  ahead  of  me,  and  during  1897  produced  some  very 
excellent  subjects.  My  productions  during  this  time  were  hardly 
more  than  experimental.  Later  in  that  year,  however,  I  discovered 
Alfred  Darling,  and  found  that  1  e  was  the  source  of  all  the  cameras 
and  appliances,  which  had  enabled  Esm6  Collings  and  G.  A.  Smith 
to  accomplish  their  work.  And  I  am  bound  to  admit  that  as  far 
as  I  am  concerned  it  was  Darling's  ingenuity  in  carrying  out  our 
ideas  that  made  work  in  those  early  days  at  all  possible,  for  we 
were  thrown  upon  our  own  resources  entirely,  and  were  confronted 
by  innumerable  difficulties  in  working  cut  and  per'ecting  our 
apparatus.  Darling  made  the  first  rotary  perforator,  I  believe, 
which  made  perforating  easy  work.  He  afterwards  designed 
a  camera  which  has  been  the  standard  design  now  for 
many  years.  I  might  say,  by  the  way,  that  the  camera  we  have  on 
the  market  is  from  Darling's  design,  but  the  patent  movement  is 
our  own. 

"  In  those  days  the  average  length  of  a  film  subject  was  60  feet, 
and    my   earliest  productions  were  comics,  'Winning  the  gloves,' 


'  Washing  the  sweep,'  'The  raughty  boys,'  and  about  20  others 
of  a  similar  length.  The  work  fascinated  me  and  I  determined  to 
'  cut  '  the  physic  business  and  devote  my  whole  time  to  i'.  Large 
and  commodious  works  were  erected  at  Wilbury  Road,  Hove,  and 
there  we  continued  to  make  films  down  to  the  summer  of  last  year 
when  the  premises  and  studio  equipment  were  acqu  red  by  Mr. 
Charles  Urban  for  the  production  of  Kinemacolor  films. 

Work  at  Hove. 

"  Our  work?  Well,  yes,  we  were  kept  fairly  busy  in  those  days 
at  Hove.  Some  of  our  best  known  subjects,  such  as  '  Attack  on  a 
China  Mission  Station,'  'Spring  Cleaning,'  'An  Interesting 
Story,'  'Fire!  Fire!'  (the  first  subject  to  be  supplied  tinted; 
this  was  coloured  red  in  the  fire  part),  '  Our  new  Errand  Boy,'  and 
later  dramatic  subjects,  such  as  '  The  Stowaway,'  and  'Two  Little 
Waifs,'  had  quite  considerable  sales.  Most  of  the  sales  were  in  Eng- 
land for  in  those  days  showmen  bough  t  their  films  outright ;  renting 
was  quite  the  exception.  However  about  the  year  1908  when 
picture  theatres  increased  so  enormously  in  America  the  experts  to 
that  country  were  very  large,  and  English  films  sold  by  fifties 
which  buyers  would  not  look  at  now.  We  were  rather  late  in  get- 
ting into  this  market,  but  we  had  fixed  up  a  contract  to  send  fifty 
copies  of  everything  we  made,  and  this  ran  for  three  months  only, 
when  we  received  a  cable  'stop  all  further  shipments.'  The 
Trust  had  come  ;  the  American  markets  were  for  some  time 
entirely  closed  to  mo't  of  the  European  makers,  and  remain  so  for 
the  most  part  down  to  the  present  time. 

"  The  immediate  result  of  this  was  a  rush  to  the  London  market 
.if  all  the  makers  shut  out  from  America,  and  later  on  an  over- 
whelming invasion  by  the  American  producers  themselves.  The 
Paris  Convention  was  the  immediate  outcome  of  this,  but  the  only 
solid  result  that  I  have  any  recollection  of  was  a  sumptuous 
banquet  by  Mr.  George  Eastman  of  the  Kodak  Co  to  the 
members.  I  think  I  have  told  you  sufficient  to  give  you  an  idea  of 
what  I  know  about  the  Trade,  and  I  would  only  wish  to  add  that 
in  my  opinion  there  is  no  reason  whatever  why  the  British  pro- 
ducer should  not  repel  this  invasion  and  regain  the  country  for 
himself.  Unfortunately  the  British  capitalist  does  not  believe  in 
picture  production  ?s  a  profitable  investment.  Apparently  he  is 
better  content  to  lose  his  money  at  the  other  end." 

Building  up  Anew. 

"We  ourselves  gave  up  producing  because  we  realised  that 
the  whole  business  of  making  pictures  required  to  be  handled 
in  an  entirely  different  way.  I  therefore  came  to  London, 
and  from  our  Sales  Department  at  27,  Cecil  Court,  began 
to  build  up  the  business  on  new  lines.  We  dropped  the  manu- 
facture of  films,  and  my  second  son,  an  engineer,  who  had  been 
experimenting  with  cameras  and  printers,  and  already  had  a  good 
sale  for  them,  helped  me  to  start  a  depot  for  our  machinery,  and 
we  then  established  a  renting  department,  which  has  since  grown 
to  very  large  proportions. 

"Various  branches  of  the  busit  ess  kept  on  growing  till 
last  summer  we  overflowed  into  iC,  Cecil  Court,  and  finding 
that  we  required  still  more  room  we  looked  about  lor  a  facte  y 
where  we  cou'd  house  all  our  departments  under  one  roof,  and 
finally  we  decided  upon  our  present  premises  in  Denmark  Street, 
which  we  are  still  busy  fitting  up  as  you  can  see." 

A  Factory  Under  One  Roof. 

The  new  premises  of  the  Williamson  Kinematograph  Compan) 
are  as  commodious  and  well  equipped  as  any  in  the  ttade  The 
whole  business  is  now  carried  on  under  one  roof — an  immense 
advantage,  and  one  which  makes  for  economy  in  organisation  and 
administration.  Temporally  the  counting  house  is  on  theground 
floor,  but  when  the  alterations  are  complete  this  department  will 
be  transferred  upstairs,  and  the  space  available  will   be  used   as  a 


May,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


11 


Rfti 


ftft 


A  PIONEER. 


12 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  191 2. 


show-room  Mr.  Williamson's  own  private  office  adjoins  the 
counting  house.  In  the  basement  are  a  roomy  film  hire  depart- 
ment and  a  pr  jecting  theatre.  On  the  first  floor  is  the  drawing 
office,  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Colin  Williamson,  and  the  next 
story  is  occupied  by  complete  engineering  workshops,  where  the 
Williamson  machines  are  erected  and  tested.  The  two  lop  floois 
are  devoted  to  dirk  rooms,  and  developing,  printing,  and  dr\ing 
rooms. 

The  Spacing  of  Pictures. 

It  was  whilst  we  were  inspecting  the  ingenious  perforating 
machines  which  the  Williamson  Company  turn  out,  that  Mr. 
Williamson  touched  upon  a  question  of  interest  to  all  who  handle 
pic  lures. 

"If  one  could  only  get  people  to  agree  as  to  the  spacing  of 
pictures,"  he  said,  "  what  an  infinity  of  trouble  it   would  save." 

Mr  Williamson  was  referring  to  the  vexed  question  as  to 
whether  the  dividing  line  in  the  pictures  should  be  across  the 
hole  or  between  the  hole.  He  is  most  anxious  to  see  the  system 
standardised,  as  he  maintains  it  would  be  the  means  of  savirg 
everyone  in  the  trade  a  deal  of  unnecessary  trouble.  "  If  we  could 
only  get  people  to  arrive  at  a  common  understanding  on  the  point 
we  should  then  make  all  cameras  to  one  standard.  At  present 
nearly  all  the  English  and  American  cameras  have  the  line  across 
the  hole,  whereas  the  Continental  are  chiefly  between  the  hole.  The 
chief  advantage  of  standardising  would  be  that  no  masking  would 
be  required  in  projecting  a  picture,  except  in  threading  up,  and  in 
case  of  a  slip.  It  would  also  eliminate  the  chance  of  the  dividing 
line  between  the  pictures  appearing  across  the  centre  of  the  screen, 


as  sometimes  occurs    when   you  get   the  films  of  different  makers 
coming  next  to  one  another — a  point  for  the  exhibitor." 

Constitution  of  the  Business. 

In  talking  of  the  business,  Mr.  Williamson  told  me  that  it 
was  run  as  Williamson  &  Co.  up  to  June,  igoS,  when,  under  an 
arrangement  with  its  New  York  agents,  the  London  Branch  was 
converted  into  a  limited  liability  company  under  the  name  of 
Williamson,  Dressier  and  Co.,  Ltd.  About  the  same  time  the 
producing  and  engineering  business  was  converted  into  another 
limited  company  under  the  name  of  the  Williamson  Kine- 
matograph  Co.,  Ltd.  In  October,  191 1,  the  premises  at  28, 
Denmark  Street  were  taken  and  the  whole  of  the  business  of  both 
companies  was  transferred  here  in  the  name  of  the  Williamson, 
Kinematograph  Co. ,  Ltd.  The  whole  of  the  shares  in  the  company 
are  held  by  Mr.  James  Williamson   and  his  sons. 

"  To  give  you  some  idea  of  the  extent  of  our  connection,"  said 
Mr.  Williamson,  "  I  may  mention  that  this  month  alone  we  have 
sent  goods  to  Japan,  the  Philippines,  Norway,  Sweden,  India, 
South  Africa,  and  Holland,  and,  of  course,  we  are  sending  to 
America  every  week. 

opinion   is   that  we   shall    learn  to 
British   goods,   and   less   and   less 


"The  future?  Well,  my 
depend  more  and  more  upon 
upon  those  that  are  imported." 

And  I  left  Mr  Williamson 
busy  giving  directions  for  the 
despatching  abroad  of  a  big 
consignment  of  all  -  British 
goods. 


[JOt&&tVl>LJZu. . 


In  the  extraordinary  popularity  of  the  cinematograph,  many 
people  see  an  influence  of  an  improving  kind.  Poetry,  music,  and 
art  are  an  acquired  taste  ;  man  may  live  without  them,  as  a  Victorian 
poet  of  some  celebrity  said.  It  is  quite  possible  that  the  mechanical 
devices  in  question  are  helping  on  the  very  development  of  public 
interest  in  such  things — which  is  most  to  be  desired— and, 
particularly  in  the  case  of  moving  pictures,  it  is  probable  that 
their  effect  will  be  to  elevate  popular  standards  and  stimulate 
a  higher  artistic  appreciation. — New  York   World. 


The  actor  is  being  employed,  not  superseded,  by  the  cinemato 
graph.  Only  indirectlv  will  the  cinema  theatre  affect  the  actor  and 
the  drami,  by  its  effect  on  prices  of  admi-sion,  which  are  at 
present  quite  ridiculous  It  ought,  by  the  way,  to  have  a  directly 
stimulating  effect  on  the  art  of  pantomime. — George  Bernard  Shaw. 

The  cinematograph  is  encouraging  the  love  of  drama  in  a  vast 
number  of  people  who  otherwise  never  had  their  dramatic  palates 
tickled. — Mr.  Cvril  Maude. 


A    STEP    IN    THE 
RIGHT  DIRECTION 


^7   j&   jZ> 


OLLOW     THIS     MAN.      He  is   hastening 
to  secure  a  copy   of  our   Complete   Cata- 
logue and   learn  how   he    can    obtain    the 
Best     Apparatus    at     the    Most    Reasonable    Cost. 


j&  j&  j& 


Call,   'Phone,  wire    or  write  to 


JURY'S  KINE  SUPPLIES,  U. 

(W    DAY    Director  and  General  Manager) 

7:  UPPER  ST.  MARTIN'S  LANE,  LONDON,  W.C. 


Telegrams : 
Jukinsup,  London." 


Telephone  : 
No.  8914,  Gerrard. 


THE     CINEMA. 


fSSANAY      THE    HIGH    STANDARD    OF    PRODUCTION      ES^NAY 
:      MAINTAINED     BY     — 

Y./B/S^/VVOAi     PHOTOPLAYS 

ammmmmm      mmWmWmmm* — — —  i   mmiii^     ■ —ii    ■ 

K     ^**^  £  /W«£S     THEM  h    ^^"^  C 

"HCIOPIAYJ      INDISPENSABLE      TO     EVERY     PROGRAM.       "liOTOPLAY") 


AL«AL 


WESTERN!     COMEDY. 


I      BES 


TS         ps 


oncH  0 


Released  Thursday,  May  30th. 
Approximate  Length  994  ft. 


ONE  OF  THE  FINEST  OF  THE  '•  ALKALI"  SERIES  EVER  PRODUCED. 


gRONC 


WESTERN     DRAMA. 


HO    Bit"   *nd    TH£    fi 


Released  Sunday,  June  2nd. 
Approximate  Length  974  ft. 


D. 


MR.    G.    M      ANDERSON    AS    "BRONCHO    BJLLV  "    IM    ANOTHER    THRILLING    ADVENTURE, 

EASTERN     DRAMA. 


I  ANES°ME     R°BF'RrFl 

VI      mm     A      ■  Released    rhursday,  fune  6th.  ■■    "         I  ^fc 

■      ^^mW  Approximate   Length    984    ft.  J"i^t 

A    THRILLING     DRAMA    OF    WIRELESS     TELEGRAPHY. 

WESTERN     DRAMA. 

0AD     AG-«rs     LOV 
Released  Thursday,  June  6th.  WS 

Approximate    Length    960  ft. 

A    PICTURE    DEPICTING   THE   TRUE    LOVE    OF   THE     "  WILD    WESTERNER." 


UND 


ER 


WESTERN     DRAMA. 

MEX'CAN 


Released  Sunday,  June  9th. 
Approximate  Length  966  ft. 


SK 


A    DRAMA   OF    MEXICAN    LIFE    PORTRAYED    WITH    REALISTIC    EFFECT. 


THE 


EASTERN      DRAMA. 


CLUE 

3  13th.  ^^  ■  \^g§t 


Released  Thursday,  June 
Approximate    Length    996    ft 
A    DOMESTIC     DRAMA   WITH    AN    UNUSUALLY    CLEVER    PLOT. 

We  Shall  be  Pieased  to  Supply  You  with  Full  Details  of  the  above  Features. 


PROGRAM 


REGULARLY 


14  THE     CINEMA.  May,   1912. 


THE   VIV 

THE  ONLY  SINGING  PIC 

UNQUALIFIED 


POINTS    TO 


1.  That  Singing  Pictures  are  the    best    possible 

2.  That  they  give    none    of   the  trouble  and  ex 

3.  That   they   are  very  cheap    to    instal  ;     only 

4.  That  there  is  nothing    to    get    out    of   order. 

intelligent  operator. 

5.  That  all  the    latest   songs    can    be    obtained., 

6.  That  the   tremendous  drawing  power  of  the 

is  an  undisputed  fact. 

WRITE   TO-DAY  FOR   CATALOGUE 
ALL  PRINTS  ON  EASTMAN 

THE    HEPWORTH    MAN 

Cinemato 

2,  DENMAN  STREET,  PICCA 


Telegrams : 
Heptoic,    London." 


m 


May,    1912.  IflJi     CI  IN  H. MA.  15 


APHONE. 

TURES     WHICH     GIVE 
SATISFACTION. 


REMEMBER  : 


break  in  a  continuous  programme. 

pense  of  Variety  Turns. 

£5  5s.  Fitted  to  any  projector. 

Perfect  synchronization  can  always  be  obtained  by  any 

Fresh  subjects  are  added  every  week. 

Vivaphone  has  been  proved   over  and  over  again,  and 

AMD    FULL    PARTICULARS. 
KODAK   STOCK    ONLY. 

UFACTURING  CO.,  LTD., 

graphers, 

DILLY  CIRCUS,  LONDON,  W.    %&ZL 


16 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   1912. 


THE  VITAGRAPH  Co. 

OF  AMERICA, 
15-17,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  W.C. 


Released  Thursday, 
May   16,   1912. 


Length 
1,018   feet. 


SPECIAL    ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF  THE  VITAGRAPH  GRAND  HISTORICAL  WAR  FEATURE  FILM 

"THE  — ,  ,„ 1 M  THE  CHARGE 

OF  THE 

______  LIGHT 

CROSS;  or,  mBBtfJBM  brigade. 


Victoria 


The  heroism  of  a  young 
officer,  the  winning  of  his 
spurs  and  the  Command- 
ing General's  daughter, 
and     his     decoration      by 


5> 


Queen  Victoria  with  the 
Victoria  Cross  for  distin- 
guished bravery,  gives  us  a 
thrilling  story  which  must 
inspire  every  British  heart. 


In  all  history  no  more  Spectacular  Military  Charga  was  ever  made  than  that   of    the    Light   Brigade,  which 
came  near  annihilating  every  one  of  the  Gallant  Six  Hundred. 


Edith  Storey. 


Julia  Swayne. 


Wallace   Reid. 


THE  VITAGRAPH  Co.,  of  America,  have  introduced  and  reproduced    this  stirring    event  in  accordance  with  the 
poetic  and  artistic  grandeur  of  the  famous  poem  by  Tennyson. 


Supplement   to    "The  Cinema,"  May,  1912. 


MAY,     3912. 


THE    LURE   OF   THE   FOOTLIGHTS. 

Hepworth  Manufacturing  Co.,  2,  Denman  Street, 
Piccadilly,  W. 


THE  Stage  has  an  attraction  for  countless  thousands  of 
young  men  and  women,  and  any  book  or  play  which 
:  gives  a  faithful  representation  of  life  "behind  the 
scenes  "  with  all  its  attendant  hardships  is  sure  to 
attract  attention. 

In   "  The  Lure  of  the  Footlights,"   we  have  a  story 
-  which  grips  the  attention  from  start  to  finish,  and  is  sure  to  be 
immensely  popular. 

Dr.  Trent,  a  rising  surgeon  with  a  large  and  flourishing  practice, 
has  a  young  and  very  pretty  wife  to  whom  he  is  devoted.  Mrs. 
Trent  is  the  fortunate  possessor  of  a  beautiful  voice  and  she  is 
secretly  very  anxious  to  use  her  gift  professionally,  although  she 
knows  her  husband  would  never  countenance  the  idea.  One  even- 
ing, whilst  singing  at  an  "  At  Home  "  given  by  one  of  the  many 
theatrical  friends  whose  society  she  so  much  frequents,  she  is 
heard  by  the  manager  of  London's  most  famous  musical  comedy 
theatre.  Taking  her  on  one  side  he  tells  her  that  with  a  gift  like 
hers  she  ought  most  certainly  to  go  on  the  stage,  and  that  if  she 
does  so  he  prophesies  she  wM  soon  have  the  world  at  her  feet. 
In  addition  to  this  he  promises  her  that  if  she  will  come  to  him  he 
will  start  her  by  giving  her  a  part  at  one  of  his  theatres.  She  goes 
home  with  her  head  full  of  the  idea  and  her  imagination  fired  with 
thoughts  of  her  future  triumphs,  but  her  husband  at  once  negatives 
the  whole  scheme,  telling  her  that  her  first  duty  is  to  her  home  and 
to  her  child. 

However,  Hailing,  the  London  manager,  calls  on  her  the  follow- 
ing day  and  tries  his  hardest  to  persuade  her  to  disregard  her 
husband's  wishes,  and  to  join  the  new  piece  that  is  now  being 
rehearsed  at  his  theatre.  Whilst  they  are  in  the  midst  of  this  con- 
versation, Dr.  Trent  returns,  and  sternly  orders  HalUng  from  the 
house.  But  the  mischief  is  done  ;  Dorothy  Trent  has  listened  to  the 
tempter  too  long,  and  on  the  following  dav  she  quits  her  home  in 
company  with  Hailing,  leaving  a  note  for  her  husband  saying  that 
she  will  return  when  she  is  a  famous  actress,  and  when  he 
acknowledges  his  mistake.  She  duly  arrives  at  the  theatre, 
accompanied  by  her  new  friend,  and  to  her  intense  delight  is 
ins'antly  given  a  part.  After  her  first  rehearsal  she  returns  home 
to  her  rooms  to  study  it  ;  but  now  comes  the  moment  when  she 
is  expected  to  pay  the  price,  for  Hailing  calls  at  her  rooms  and 
proceeds  to  make  love  to  her  in  a  most  unmistakable  fashion. 
Dorothy  Trent,  young  and  inexperienced  in  the  ways  of  the  world, 
had  never  expected  anything  of  this  kind,  nor  realised  the 
position  in  which  she  was  placing  herself.  In  a  sudden  access  of 
rage  she  strikes  him  in  the  face,  bidding  him  leave  her  room 
instantly.  He  does  so,  telling  her  that  she  will  soon  regret  ber 
:tion  and  she  finds  that  this  is  no  idle  threat,  and  as  he  helped 
ler  to  get  the  part  in  the  first  place  so  he  can  with  equal  rapidity 
indo  his  work,  for  on  reaching  the  stage  door  next  morning  she 
refused  admission  and  is  handed  a  note  which  curtly  informs 
ler  that  her  services  are  no  longer  required. 

From  now  onwards  things  go  very  badly  with  Dorothy,  for  her 
foolish  pride  will  not  allow  her  to  return  to  her  husband  and  admit 
that  she  has  failed,  and  so  she  goes  from  one  company  to  another 
ever  sinking  lower  and  lower  in  the  scale,  until  at  length  she  finds 
herself  in  a  poor  "fit  up  "  company,  and  to  make  matters  worse 
io  money  is  forthcoming  at  the  end  of  the  week  to  pay  the  salaries. 
Unable  to  settle  her  bill  for  food  and  lodgings,  and  threatened 
by  her  landlady,  she  tries  desperately  at  all  the  agents  for  work, 
but  is  unable  to  find  any.  At  last,  in  utter  despair,  she  even  turns 
to  thoughts  of  suicide  and  wanders  along  the  river  bank  desperate 


and  yet  afraid.  Then  turning  and  running  from  the  spot  in  blind,, 
unreasoning  terror,  she  is  struck  down  by  a  passing  motor  car  and 
left  senseless  on  the  ground.  She  is  taken  to  the  hospital  and 
there  the  first  doctor  who  comes  to  her  bedside  is  her  own  husband. 
At  the  sight  of  his  face  her  long-repressed  love  for  him  surges  up 
in  her  heart  and  in  a  voice  choked  with  tears  she  acknowledges 
her  fault  and  begs  to  be  forgiven. 

Her  husband  in  his  delight  at  seeing  her  again  is  willing  to  for- 
get and  forgive  the  past,  and  folding  her  in  his  arms  he  tells  her 
that  she  is  forgiven  and  that  he  and  their  little  daughter  are  only 
waiting  for  her  return.  So  we  get  a  final  glimpse  of  Dorothy,  only 
too  thankful  to  be  once  more  with  her  husband  and  her  child  in  the 
safe  haven  of  her  home,  with  her  love  of  the  footlights  and  stage 
life  gone  for  ever,  and  the  unhappy  past  lying  behind  her  like  an 
evil  dream  that  is  forgotten  at  the  glad  breaking  of  a  summer 
morn. 

Length  1 ,025  feet.     Released  May  23rd. 


A  ROAD  AGENT'S  LOVE." 

Essanay  Co.,  5,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


A  FINE '  Western  Drama.  May  Parker,  a  pretty 
Western  girl,  drives  to  the  railway  station  one 
morning  for  a  trunk.  The  trunk  is  much  too  heavy 
for  her  to  handle  and  she  is  making  futile  efforts  to 
lift  it  into  the  buggy  when  a  stalwart  young  fellow 
steps  up,  lifts  the  heavy  affair  easily  into  the  rig  and 
doffs  his  hat  politely.  May  is  greatly  smitten  with  his  handsome 
face,  thanks  him  prettily  and  drives  away.  Later,  old  Parker  gets 
into  financial  straits  and  is  pressed  for  time  by  a  crabbed  money- 
lender who  threatens  trouble  if  the  mortgage  is  not  settled.  The 
landlord,  Perkins  by  name,  now  meets  May  and  instantly  falls  in 
love  with  her.  He  now  proposes  to  Parker  that  he  will  extend  him 
all  the  time  he  wants  to  get  financially  on  his  feet  if  he  can  have 
May  for  his  wife.  Parker  informs  May,  who  heroically  agrees  to 
sacrifice  herself  to  save  her  father.  She  now  meets  the  stalwart 
stranger  and  tells  him  of  their  trouble.  Later  this  stranger 
receives  a  note  from  May  saying  she  is  g_oing  to  marry  old  Perkins 
to  save  her  father  from  giving  up  their  home.  With  an  air  of 
determination  the  stranger  crosses  to  an  old  tree-stump  on 
which  is  a  placard  offering  a  reward  of  $5,000  for  the  capture  of 
Fargo,  a  notorious  bandit.  With  a  grim  smile  he  gazes  off  towards 
the  smoky  hills — for  he  is  Fargo  !  An  hour  later  May  receives  a 
note  from  "  a  friend,"  telling  her  Fargo  is  hiding  in  Rattlesnake 
Cave  and  for  her  to  capture  him  and  get  the  reward,  thus  saving 
herself  from  Perkins.  May  summons  the  sheriff  and  a  posse  and 
leads  them  1 3  the  cave,  where  Fargo  quietly  submits  to  capture. 
May  recognises  him  and  starts  to  plead  with  the  sheriff  to  set  him 
free,  but  Fargo  prevents  her  and  is  led  ^way.  May  is  paid  the 
money,  and  old  Perkins,  a  picture  of  bitter  disappointment,  pockets 
the  mortgage  money  and  leaves,  while  May  promises  her  mother  to- 
wait  for  Fargo  until  he  is  released  from  gaol. 
Length  960  feet.     Released  June  6th. 

"UNDER   MEXICAN  SKIES." 

Pasquale,  a  half-breed  Mexican,  secures  work  on  the  ranch  of 
old  Fowler.  Fowler  has  a  pretty  daughter,  Vedah,  who  teaches 
the  district  school.  Pasquale  meets  the  girl  on  several  occasions 
and  falls  in  love  with  her.  She  repulses  his  attentions  and  tries  to 
show  him  his  error  in  loving  her,  but  Pasquale  is  determined  and. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


19]  2. 


one  day,  rides  to  the  schoolhouse  after  the  children  are  dismissed. 
Finding  Vedah  alone  he  again  renews  his  attentions  and  is  on  the 
point  of  taking  her  in  his  arms  when  she  holds  aloft  a  crucifix  and, 
terror-stricken,  Pasquale  hurriedly  leaves.  Vedah  returns  to  the 
ranchhouse,  and  her  father,  noticing  her  agitation,  finally  learns  of 
Pasquale's  intended  insult.  Furious,  old  Fowler  arouses  the  cow- 
boys, they  capture  Pasquale  at  his  shack  and  are  about  to  string 
him  up  when  Vedah  dashes  up,  pleads  for  the  Mexican's  life  and 
secures  his  freedom.  A  few  weeks  later. Vedah  attracts  the  atten-. 
tion  of  a  young  Easterner  who  asks  her  to  be  his  wife.  She  refuses 
and,  for  revenge,  he  lures  her  to  the  shack  of  Pasquale's  com- 
panion, who  aids  him.  Here  the  Easterner  is  about  to  force  her 
into  marriage  when  Pasquale  returns,  forces  his  pal,  who  guards 
the  shack,  to  confess  what  is  going  on,  then  bursts  in,  drives  the 
Easterner  from  the  place  with  a  threat  of  death,  and  returns 
Vedah  to  her  father  out  of  gratitude  for  her  saving  his  life. 

Length  966  feet.     Released  June  9th . 

"THE    CLUE." 

A  clever  and  well-told  story.  Kathleen  Nesbit,  a  clerk  in  a 
department  store,  is  the  only  support  of  a  sick  mother.  Coming 
out  of  a  drug  store  one  day,  Kathleen  aids  an  old  man  who  has 
fallen  on  the  sidewalk.  She  supports  him  to  his  lodgings,  then 
goes  on  to  her  work.  Several  weeks  later  the  old  man,  Karl 
Linden  by  name,  runs  across  Kathleen  at  her  counter  and,  grateful 
for  her  former  kindness,  writes  a  will  upon  his  cuff  bequeathing 
her  all  his  possessions.  A  few  days  later  Kathleen  receives  a 
letter  from  a  lawyer  advising  her  of  Linden's  sudden  death  and 
that  she  is  the  beneficiary  of  his  will.  The  old  man's  belongings 
are  brought  to  her  home,  and  she  finds  there  is  nothing  of  value 
except  an  old  clothes  ches.t,  a  battered  watch  and  several  small 
trinkets.  More  misfortune  falls  upon  her,  for  she  is  late  for  work 
and  is  discharged  by  the  floorwalker  of  her  department.  To  make 
matters  worse  the  doctor  now  tells  her  she  must  send  her  mother 
away  to  a  warmer  climate  or  she  will  die.  Kathleen  has  no  money 
and  is  at  her  wit's  end.  Rummaging  through  the  old  clothes  chest 
of  Linden's  she  suddenly  comes  upon  a  document  filled  with 
strange  scrawls  that  resemble  Chinese  writing.  Slowly  folding 
the  paper,  Kathleen  suddenly  starts,  for,  there  in  plain  writing, 
made  by  the  joining  of  a  number  of  hieroglyphics,  she  reads  : 
"  False  Bottom  in  Chest."  With  a  cry  Of  joy  she  seizes  a  hatchet, 
rips  out  the  false  bottom  from  the  old  clothes  chest  and  finds  a 
fortune  in  bonds  and  money.  Linden  has  played  a  strange  trick, 
but  nevertheless  has  rewarded  her  richly  and  the  days  of  poverty 
for  her  and  her  mother  are  at  an  end. 

Length  996  feet.     Released  June  13th. 

"LONESOME    ROBERT." 

A  story  full  of  thrills  and  one  which  makes  a  most  telling  appeal 
to  the  audiences.  Little  Robert  Woods,  a  cripple,  gazes  longingly 
from  the  window  each  day  at  the  children  romping  past.  In  this 
way  he  becomes  acquainted  with  Tom  Morris,  a  stalwart,  handsome 
chap  who  is  a  wireless  operator  in  the  plant  of  Mr.  Harding,  a 
capitalist  near  by.  Tom  interests  himself  in  the  helpless  little 
fellow  and,  to  please  him  instals  a  miniature  wireless  outfit  in 
Robert's  bedroom  and  teaches  him  the  code.  Each  night  Tom 
and  Robert  exchange  messages  back  and  forth  between  the  office 
and  the  bedroom,  and  Robert  becomes  very  proficient.  One 
night  Harding  is  forced  to  lock  a  large  sum  of  money  in  the  office 
safe  and  Tom  is  left  to  guard  it.  Two  Thugs  now  force  an  entrance 
into  the  office,  overpower  Tom  and  leave  him  bound  on  the  table 
that  contains  his  wireless  outfit.  While  the  crooks  are  in  the  inner 
office  securing  the  money,  Tom  managed  to  wriggle  his  bound 
hands  to  the  sender  ofOhe  outfit  and  laboriously  ticks  out  a  cry  for 
help  to  little  Robert's  bedroom.  Robert  is  awakened  by  a  noisy 
sputter,  and  spells  out  the  message  from  Tom  :  ' '  Help  !  Help  ! 
Robbers!"  Robert's  cries  bring  his  father,  who  is  a  policeman. 
Instantly  Woods  dons  his  uniform  and  rushes  out  to  head  off  the 
ruffians  before  they  can  escape  from  Harding's  office.  Meanwhile 
the  robbers  have  gotten  the  money,  wave  it  before  Tom's  eyes,  and 
are  on  the  point  of  escaping  when  the  door  is  burst  open  and 
Woods,  with  two  brother  officers,  confront  them  with  levelled  guns. 
Mr.  Harding  is  summoned  on  the  'phone  and,  an  hour  later,  little 
Robert  is  made  the  happiest  boy  in  the  city  by  a  handsome  reward 
from  Harding,  while  Tom  hugs  the  little  fellow  in  his  arms. 

Length  990  feet.     Released  June  6th. 


"SAVED    BY    FIRE." 

New    Century    Film    Service,    Ltd.,    Leeds   and    London. 


WE  have  referred  at  great  length  in  these  columns  to  the 
superb  historical  film  "  Christopher  Columbus," 
released  by  the  New  Century  Film  Service,  Ltd., 
at  the  beginning  of  last  month,  and  more  than  once 
we  have  written  appreciatively  of  the  enterprise 
displayed  by  this  firm  in  putting  so  magnificent  a  work 
upon  the  English  market. 

It  must  have  occurred  to  more  than  one  person  privileged  to  see 
this  great  picture  play  that  the  New  Century  Film  Service,  Ltd., 
would  be  hard  put  to  it  to  find  its  equal.  But  that  they  have 
unquestionably  done  so  was  clearly  demonstrated  a  week  or  two 
ago,  when  we  were  invited  to  a  private  view,  at  the  London  offices 
of  the  company  in  Rupert  Street,  of,  a  new  film,  shortly  to  be 
released.  It  is  the  work  of  the  Clarendon  Film  Company,  and 
therefore  an  all-British  picture  story,  and  its  title — ' '  Saved  by  Fire. ' ' 
It  is  the  first  serious  attempt  to  produce  an  entirely  English  three- 
reel  subject,  and  the  result  has  in  every  way  justified  the  effort, 
for  the  story  is  a  magnificent  tribute  to  the  work  of  the  English 
producer.  The  Clarendon  Film  Company  must  be  highly 
congratulated  upon  turning  out  so  splendid  a  story.  It  is  strong 
in  detail  and  incident,  is  superbly  acted  and  staged,  and 
grips  the  attention  from  start  to  finish.  "Saved  by  Fire" 
is  highly  sensational  in  its  closing  episodes,  and  yet  there 
is  not  one  single  incident  which  is  not  handled  with  the 
greatest  care.  The  subject  is  a  great  one  and  it  has  been  treated 
in  a  great  way,  and  devotees  of  the  picture  theatre  will  crowd  in 
their  thousands  to  see  this  wonderful  representation  of  a  story 
which  is  irresistible  in  its  appeal . 

If  the  Clarendon  Film  Company  is  to  be  felicitated  upon  its  pro- 
duction, the  New  Century  Film  Service  is  to  be  highly  congratu- 
lated upon  securing  the  sole  rights  of  so  fine  a  film,  and  we  have 
little  hesitation  in  predicting  for  "Saved  by  Fire"  an  immense 
and  popular  success.  The  fire  scenes  alone,  which  come  almost  as 
a  surprise  at  the  close  of  the  story,  and  form  a  fitting  climax  to  it, 
will  make  it  the  talk  of  the  town  wherever  it  is  shown,  for  they 
are  realistic  and  thrilling  to  a  degree. 

The  story  in  brief  is  as  follows :  Robert  and  Dora  have  been 
married  but  a  few  months.  They  live  for  each  other,  revelling  in 
the  full  possession  of  each  other's  love.  Dora  is  an  accomplished 
pianiste,  whilst  Robert  is  an  equally  talented  violinist,  hence  thev 
spend  many  happy  musical  evenings  together.  The  maid  enters, 
bringing  the  paper,  in  which  appears  an  announcement  of  the  first 
performance  of  "  Eulalie  "  at  the  London  Opera  House.  They 
decide  to  witness  the  production  and  soon  we  see  them  seated  in 
the  dress  circle  and  joining  in  the  tumultuous  applause  with  which 
the  opera  is  greeted.  Like  his  brother  Bohemians.  Robert  repairs 
to  the  wings  to  congratulate  Eulalie  on  her  triumph,  and  it  is  at 
once  apparent  that  the  singer  is  attracted  by  his  personality.  He 
lingers  long  in  converse  with  Eulalie,  while  Dora  in  the  circle 
impatiently  waits  his  return.  The  rift  in  the  lute  is  not  long  in 
making  its  appearance.  A  week  later  Eulalie  calls  upon  Robert, 
and  Dora,  entering  the  room  unexpectedly,  overhears  words 
which  were  not  meant  for  her.  This  awakens  her  suspicions,  and 
when  a  letter  arrives  for  Robert  unmistakably  addressed  by  a 
feminine  hand,  Dora  surreptitiously  opens  it  and  reads  the  follow- 
ing :— 

My  Dearest  Boy, — I  love  to  call  you  boy.  I  am 
writing  to  ask  you  to  come  to  my  At  Home  on  Wednesday. 
Do  not  trouble  your  wife  to  come.  I  am  a  little  bit  jealous  of 
her,  and,  besides,  I  want  you  to  stay  after  the  crowd  have  gone. 

Sealing  the  letter;  she  places  it  among  Robert's  other  correspon- 
dence. When  he  arrives  at  the  breakfast  table  as  lie  opens  each 
letter  he  hands  the  contents  to  Dora  to  peruse.  Then  stealthily 
picking  up  the  missive  from  Eulalie,  he  hastily  glances  it  through 
and  endeavours  to  hide  it  from  his  wife.  She,  however,  demands 
that  it  shall  be  handed  to  her,  and  the  first  tiff  during  the  married 
life  of  the  pair  takes  place,  Dora  quickly  being  reduced  to  tears. 
When  she  has  left  the  room  Robert  destroys  the  incriminating 
epistle.  On  the  night  of  the  At  Home  he  tells  Dora  he  must  go 
out  on  business.  When  he  has  gone  Dora  determines  to  follow 
him.  At  Eulalie's  house  Robert  is  asked  to  play,  and  his  listeners 
are  enthralled.  The  evening  is  well  advanced  before  Dora 
succeeds  in  finding  the  house,  but  having  done  so  she  secures  admit- 
tance, and,  hearing  footstepts,  she  conceals  herself  behind  a 
curtain  in  the  drawing-room.  Thither  repair  Robert  and  Eulalie, 
and  soon  the  couple  are  reciting  love's  sweet  tale.     This  is  more 


May,  1912. 


Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


111. 


than  Dora  can  bear,  and,  emerging  from  her  place  of  concealment, 
she  accuses  her  husband.  Thoroughly  taken  aback  by  the  presence 
of  his  wife,  Roberts  turns  to  confront  her  and  in  so  doing  knocks 
over- a  lamp.  Soon  the  place  is  in  flames,  and  all  Robert's  attempts 
to  extinguish  the  conflagration  prove  useless.  Dora  determines 
that  the  guilty  pair  shall  pay  the  penalty  of  their  misdeeds  and, 
quite  oblivious  of  her  own  safety,  turns  the  key  in  the  lock,  but 
Robert  with  almost  superhuman  effort  batters  down  the  barricade 
and  compels  the  women  to  fly.  When  they  arrive  on  the  landing 
they  find  that  the  flames  have  extended  downwards  and  they  are 
confronted  by  a  sea  of  fire.  Pursued  by  the  flames,  they  mount 
higher  and  higher  until  they  reach  the  topmost  floor.  Here,  at 
the  risk  of  his  life,  Robert  climbs  on  to  the  stair  rail,  and  with  his 
hands  against  the  wall  forms  himself  into  a  platform,  mounting 
upon  which  Eulalie  can  climb  through  the  roof  to  what  he 
supposes  will  be  safety.  Dora  refuses  to  follow  Eulalie's  example, 
out  of  the  fulness  of  her  heart  preferring  to  die  with  her  husband  if 
necessary.  Through  a  hole  in  the  wall  Robert  can  see  a  chance  of 
escape  and  compels  Dora  to  crawl  through,  afterwards  following  her 
example.  From  the  other  side  the  pair  look  down  on  the  rescue 
party  at  work  below.  Eulalie,  anxious  to  ascertain  what  has 
become  of  the  others,  peers  through  the  skylight,  and,  overcome 
by  the  smoke,  topples  forward  and  falls  into  the  seething  furnace 
below,  to  the  horror  of  Robert  and  Dora,  who  see  her  body  flash 
past.  Below,  the  fireman  are  working  hard  to  subdue  the  out- 
break ;  but,  finding  that  there  is  little  chance  of  saving  the  building, 
procure  a  jumping  sheet  and  call  to  Robert  and  Dora  to  leap.  His 
old  love  re-awakened,  Robert  insists  upon  Dora  saving  herself 
first,  and  when  she  has  been  safely  deposited  upon  the  ground,  he 
too  jumps  down  and  is  caught  by  the  members  of  the  brigade. 
Near  by  lies  Eulalie.  In  a  supplicating  attitude  she  turns  to 
Robert,  but  he,  touched  by  the  mischief  his  infatuation  for  her  has 
wrought,  only  nestles  closer  in  the  arms  of  the  one  he  had 
promised  to  love  and  honour  "  till  death  us  do  part." 


THE    VICTORIA    CROSS. 

The  Vitagraph  Co.,  Cecil  Court.  W.C. 

Im^*  T  is  often  a  matter  of   adverse  comment  that   English 
,'  historical  and  semi-historical  films  are  only  produced 

^  by  foreign  companies,  and  they  are  then  so  mangled 
as  to  be  virtually  sterile  of  historical  and  educative 
value  and  valuable  only  as  film  drama. 

A  very  welcome  exception  to  this  rule  is  ' '  The 
"  Victoria  Cross,"  a  splendid  film  in  which  the  historical  value  is 
predominant.  Actual  personages  are  also  introduced,  such  as 
Florence  Nightingale  and  the  late  Queen  Victoria. 

History  is  a  word  that  makes  one  think  back  into  the  past  ages, 
and  after  all  it  is  only  the  cinematograph  that  can  make  us  appre- 
ciate that  history  isever  with  us.  Many  Crimean  and  Mutiny  veterans 
are  still  alive.  There  are  many  thousand  veterans  of  the  later 
wars,  the  Civil  War  in  the  States,  and  the  Franco-German  War  who 
can  actually  stage  for  us,  before  the  camera,  those  scenes  that  they 
beheld  in  deadly  earnest. 

Gone  are  the  days  of  shot  and  shell  ;  the  nations  will  fight  no 
more.  That  is  the  eunuch  cry  of  the  peace  advocate,  the  Utopian 
dreamer,  whose  theories  of  brotherly  love  and  security  destroy 
empires.  Fighting  tastes  are  too  strongly  rooted  in  the  Anglo- 
Saxon  nature  for  the  vicious  theories  of  the  pacificist  to  assert 
themselves,  but  there  is  nowadays  a  tendency  to  shirk  patriotism, 
to  shirk  joining  the  Territorials,  to  shirk  paying  that  service  to 
the  country  that  it  is  most  men's  honour  to  bear. 

Such  films  as  these,  that  glorify  our  fighting  men  and  stir  the 
audience  to  feel  what  fighting  really  means,  are  welcome,  trebly 
welcome,  because  they  spread  a  message  far  and  wide  that  men 
have  fought  and  died  for  and  loved  their  own  country.  That 
patriotism  does  not  mean  waving  red,  white  and  blue  rubbish,  and 
cheering  the  men  who  do  the  work  that  the  slackers  will  not  give 
up  their  football  for,  but  taking  one's  own  part  and  share  in  the 
national  duty. 

In  this  film  you  get  the  point  of  view  of  the  clean-bred  English- 
man. The  Colonel  refuses  to  allow  the  subaltern  to  marry  his 
■daughter  until  he  has  proved  himself  to  be  a  man.  There  would 
be  no  need  of  National  Service  if  all  the  parents  of  England  would 
follow  his  example. 

Much  is  said  against  the  influence  of  films.  They  have  an 
influence  that  is  more  powerful  for  good  than  evil,  and   such  films 


as  this,  if  they  only  send  one  boy  out  of  a  thousand  to  do  his  duty 
for  his  country,  are  of  value  to  the  nation. 

We  are  rather  'ashamed  of  the  youth  of  the  nation,  and  it  is 
possible  that  seeing  the  deeds  of  their  grandfathers  may  wake 
them  up  to  the  fact  that  it  is  not  shameful  to  be  willing  to  fight  for 
their  country,  and  the  story  of  the  Charge  of  the  Light  Brigade  is 
one  that  cannot  fail  to  burn  into  the  brain  of  the  heaviest  clod. 

The  treatment  of  the  story  is  good,  a  strong  love  interest  serving 
to  bring  into  play  the  various  historical  events  represented.  The 
heroine  comes  out  with  Florence  Nightingale,  and  we  see  the  hero 
save  the  life  of  a  comrade  under  fire,  a  deed  which  earns  hirn  the 
famous  "Victoria  Cross,"  which  was  first  struck  to  reward  the 
heroes  of  the  Crimean  campaign.  The  stagecraft  and  production 
are  throughout  excellent,  and  as  a  spectacular  drama  this  film  is 
splendid.  May  its  moral  effect  be  as  triumphant  as  the  famous 
Charge. 

Length  1,018 feet.     Released  May   16th. 


"THE   GAMEKEEPER'S    REVENGE." 

The  Clarendon  Co.,  Charing  Cross  Rd.,  W.C. 

f&^f  w -lULIAN  MARSH,  bailiff  on  the  estate  of  Sir  Richard 

Eggj  <  Guildford,  is  forcing  his  attentions  on  the  wife  of  one  of 

II  the  labourers  under  him,  and  is  discovered  trying  to 
I3?S«k8  kiss  her  by  the  enraged  husband,  who,  without  hesita- 
^ggga  tion,  knocks  him  down.  Determined  to  be  revenged 
t********  on  tjle  yOUng  labourer,  he  makes  his  way  to  the  man- 
sion with  the  intention  of  enlisting  the  Squire's  sympathy  and 
securing  the  downfall  of  his  servant.  On  entering  the  Squire's 
study  he  observes  Sir  Richard  giving  his  son  a  wad  of  banknotes, 
and  shortly  after  Ronald  Guildford  leaves  the  room.  Sir  Richard 
is  highly  incensed  at  the  assault  upon  his  bailiff,  and  complies  with 
Marsh's  suggestion  by  writing  a  letter  to  John  Kemp  giving  him 
notice  to  leave.  With  this  document  in  his  pocket  Marsh  makes 
his  way  through  the  woods  to  Kemp's  cottage,  and  knocks  at  the 
door.  The  pretty  little  wife  meets  the  sinister  face  of  Julian  Marsh. 
He  hands  her  the  Squire's  note.  The  poor  girl  is  heartbroken  to 
read  the  contents,  and  Marsh  seizes  the  opportunity  to  again  fore 
his  attentions  upon  her.  He  locks  the  door,  and,  turning  out  the 
light,  seizes  her.  John  Kemp,  returning  home  a  moment  later, 
hears  the  shrill  screams  of  terror  from  his  wife,  and,  exerting  all  his 
strength,  smashes  in  the  door.  A  fierce  fight  ensues.  John  snatches  up 
a  chair  as  a  shield  against  the  sword-stick  Marsh  has  drawn,  but  it  is 
plain  that  so  unequal  a  contest  cannot  last  long.  The  young  wife,  in 
mortal  terror  of  her  husband's  life,  rushes  out  of  the  cottage  for 
help.  She  meets  Ronald,  the  Squire's  son,  and  beseeches  him  to 
save  her  husband's  life.  He  arrives  in  the  nick  of  time,  and  pro- 
mises his  father  shall  have  a  full  report  of  the  affair,  and  drawing 
out  the  wad  of  banknotes  from  his  pocket  insists  on  John  accepting 
them.  This  incident  has  been  watched  by  the  overseer  through  the 
window,  and  when  Ronald  leaves  the  cottage  he  is  followed  through 
the  undergrowth:  Marsh  murders  the  unsuspecting  man,  but  is 
seen  by  a  poacher.  Suspicion  falls  upon  John  as  the  banknotes  are 
found  upon  him.  But  at  the  moment  of  his  arrest  the  poacher 
appears,  tells  all  he  knows,  and  the  bailiff  is  handed  over  to  justice. 
Length  940  feet.     Released  May  12th, 


"SAVED    BY   HER    LION." 

Selig  Polyscope  Co.    (E.  H.  Montague,  Sole  Agent), 
12,  Gerrard  Street,  W. 

NE  of  Selig 's  splendid  animal  pictures.  This  Western 
story  depicts  the  remarkable  devotion  of  a  puma,  or 
mountain  lion,  to  its  young  mistress  and  her  family. 
Ruby  Blackwell,  atypical  young  girl  of  Arizona,  lives 
with  her  brother  Tom  and  their  widowed  mother. 
Tom  has  taught  his  little  sister  to  be  an  expert  with  the 
rifle.  One  day  Tom  takes  Ruby  on  a  lion  hunt.  They  track  a 
puma,  and  Tom  shoots  the  beast,  which,  wounded,  bounds  away 
into  the  canyon.  Tom  instructs  Ruby  to  proceed  to  the  ridge  and 
await  him  there,  while  he  follows  the  puma.  On  the  mountain 
side  Ruby  discovers  the  cubs  belonging  to  the  puma  which  Tom 
has  shot,  and  she  immediately  becomes  so  engrossed  in  playing 
with  the  huge  kittens  that  she  forgets  the  rendezvous  her  brother 
has  appointed.  Tom,  in  great  distress  at  the  disappearance  of 
Ruby,  finally  locates  her,   and   is  rendered  good-natured  by  the 


Supplement  to  THE   CINEMA. 


M 


AV,     !Cyl2. 


captivating  picture  the  girl  and  the  cubs  make  there  in  the  woods. 
The  cubs  are  taken  home.  They  grow  up  around  Ruby  like  friendly 
dogs.  Pete  Lopez,  a  bad  Mexican,  who  admires  Ruby  very  much, 
tries  to  steal  one  of  them  in  the  night,  and  the  baby  puma  defends 
itself  vigorously  until  Tom  and  Ruby  rush  to  its  rescue.  Two  years 
later,  when  Ruby  has  become  principal  of  the  little  mountain  school. 
this  puma,  now  full  grown,  finds  opportunity  to  repay  the  loyalty 
of  his  mistress  and  "  get  even  "  with  Pete  by  saving  the  life  of  Tom 
from  ravening  wolves,  and  the  honour  of  Ruby  from  the  miserable 
Mexican. 
Length:  1,012  feet.     Released  May  19th. 

"THE    DIAMOND   S    RANCH." 

In  a  few  short  years  that  unique  type,  America's  Western  Cow 
boy,  will  be  extinct,  and  the  younger  generations' of  the  future  will 
look  back  in  wonder  at  the  many  exhibitions  of  daring,  the  ail-but 
impossible  feats  of  danger  in  which  the  skilled  plainsmen  of  the 
West  take  such  well-deserved  pride.  The  motion  picture  is  the 
one  and  only  method  by  which  these  future  generations  will  be  able 
to  review  in  living  reality  this  fast-passing  and  strictly  American 
type.  By  those  who  remember  Selig's  "  Ranch  Life  in  the  Great 
South-West,'  this  announcement  of  a  companion  picture  has  been 
looked  forward  to  with  great  interest.  The  film  itself  will  create 
still  greater  interest.  "The  Diamond  S  Ranch''  abounds  in 
thrilling  scenes  of  daredevil  cowboy  life.  One  feature  of  the  great 
subject  is  a  number  of  scenes  showing  the  Champion  Woman  Bull- 
dogger  and  Steerthrower  of  the  World  in  action.  She  is  shown  in 
close  up  intimate  views  accomplishing  this  difficult  feat  in  record 
time.       This,     with    the    Congress   of    Rough    Riders,    Broncho 


Busting,  the  Round  Up,  Wild  Riding,  etc.,  make  a  picture  af  un- 
excelled skill  and  excellence. 

Length  1,000  /est-     Released  May  5th. 

"THE  BROTHERHOOD  OF  MAN." 

A  fine  American  life  film.  Billy  Young,  an  athletic  young  bank 
clerk  in  love  with  Marion  Wendell,  the  President's  daughter,  and 
his  young  friend  Jack  Skyes  one  night  accidentally  encounter  an 
old  panhandler  on  the  street.  Billy  recognises  in  him  his  old 
athletic  instructor.  Billy  bids  his  friend  good-night  and  proceeds 
to  a  near-by  restaurant  to  treat  his  old  trainer.  The  restaurant  is 
of  a  low  character  and  in  a  poor  neighbourhood.  While  eating, 
Marion  Wendell  and  her  friend  Kate  Sommers — a  mission  worker, 
enter  and  distribute  some  tracts.  The  bouncer  and  waiter  try  to 
throw  the  "reformers"  out;  Billy  and  old  Reynolds  make  short 
work  of  the  bouncer  and  waiter,  and  safely  escort  the  girls  to  the 
street,  where  they  part.  The  two  ruffians  follow  Billy  and  his 
friend,  and  use  a  blackjack  and  gun  on  them.  The  old 
trainer  has  been  removed  to  a  cheap  hotel  with  a  bullet  wound 
in  his  leg.  He  writes  Billy  and  explains  that  unless  he  can 
get  to  a  dry  climate  he  will  die.  The  doctor  tells  Billy  he  can 
leave  the  hospital,  and  he  immediately  goes  to  see  old  Reynolds. 
He  promises  assistance.  While  walking  home  that  night  his 
attention  is  arrested  by  a  large  lithograph  in  front  of  a  coliseum 
announcing  an  offer  of  five  hundred  dollars  by  the  wrestler  Terrible 
Teddy.  Billy  goes  inside,  accepts  the  challenge,  and  after  an 
exciting  contest  wins  the  prize.  Needless  to  say  he  wins  also  the 
girl  and  his  old  trainer's  gratitude. 

Length  1,031  feet.     Released  May   12th. 


OING  as  strong  as  ever  !  These  five  words 
describe  the  state  of  the  Market.  It  is 
extraordinary  the  number  of  applications  I 
receive  for  established  theatres,  and  sites  to 
be  built  upon,  from  those  already  in  the 
business  and  from,  I  may  say,  hundreds  of  others 
desirous  of  coming  in. 

<#- 
Many  are  ready  to  invest  the  whole  of  their  savings ; 
some  will  have  only  those  theatres  where  profits  can  be 
proved  by  the  books  or  theatres  which  are  well  estab- 
lished. Others  do  not  object  to  places  that  have  closed 
down  in  consequence  of  bad  management  and  other 
causes.  .  Some  want  sites  to  build  on  and  do  not  mind 
what  rent  they  pay  so  long  as  they  can  get  theatres  of 
sufficient  seating  capacity. 

In  addition  to  the  many  letters  I  receive  from  genuine 
inquirers — those  desirous  of  investing  their  own  capital 
or  have  the  money  ready  to  put  up  by  their  friends — I 
receive  many  applications  for  properties  from  what  one 
would  call  "  touts." 

<*- 

These  are  people  who  obtain  particulars  of  properties 
in  the  market,  and  then  go  hawking  them  round  with  the 
object  of  selling  the  concern  at  a  profit  before  they  buy 
it,  or  getting  commissions  from  intending  purchasers. 

<*- 

They  very  often  come  with  a  tale  that  they  have  a 
purchaser  and  ask  for  a  portion  of  the  commission.  I 
do  not  think  they  have  always  got  the  purchaser  they 
talk  about,  but  their  idea  is  to  get  particulars  of  the  best 
properties  in  the  market  and  then  hawk  them  round. 


They  have  a  way,  too,  of  getting  addresses  and 
approaching  the  owner  of  the  property,  and  try  to  deal 
direct  with  him  behind  my  back. 

<#- 

Now  let  me  say  at  once  that  these  methods  are  very 
detrimental  to  all  parties  concerned.  They  are  detri- 
mental to  the  owner,  because  his  property  is  hawked 
around  and  so  gets  cheapened  ;  and  they  are  detrimental  to 
the  purchaser,  because  he  invariably  has  to  pay  more  than 
he  would  if  he  bought  direct  through  the  accredited  agent. 

It  is  very  much  better  to  ask  at  once  for  the  purchaser 
and  deal  direct  with  him.  If  the  person  introducing 
the  purchaser  is  genuine  and  means  business,  an  agent 
will  always  allow  him  a  fee  for  the  introduction. 

<«- 

The  Imperial  Theatre  and  Hippodrome  at  Fleetwood, 
erected  in  1909,  was  offered  for  sale  by  auction  by 
Messrs.  Rushton,  Son  &  Kenyon  at  Manchester,  yesterday 
(Tuesday).  It  is  fully  licensed  for  cinematograph,  music, 
singing  and  dramatic  performances.  The  property  has 
a  frontage  of  40  ft.  to  the  main  street  at  Fleetwood,  with 
an  attractive  elevation  and  a  glass  verandah  extending 
along  the  whole  of  the  front  of  the  building.  There  are 
three  separate  entrances,  in  addition  to  another  at  the 
back  of  the  property. 

<*• 

The  seating  capacity  is  something  over  850,  with 
stalls  on  the  ground  floor  and  two  galleries  over.  There 
is  a  cinematograph  operating  box  and  a  good  stage,  with 
property  and  dressing  rooms.  The  site  is  leasehold  for 
999  years  and  the  ground  rent  is  only  £31   2s.  4d. 

A  telegram  to  hand  as  we  go  to  press  informs  us  that 
the  theatre  was  withdrawn  at  ^"3,100. 


May,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


17 


A    FAMILIAR     FIGURE    IN     "  FLICKEK    ALLEY." 


Avery,     K 

Montagu, 

L.     Schlentheim 

W.     Ogden-Smith. 


HE  record  success  which  attended  the  fouith  annual 
trade  dinner  at  the  Hotel  Cecil  in  the  early  p  irt  of  last 
month  must  largely  be  attributed  to  the  untiring 
efforts  of  the  special  committee  to  whom  the  whole  of 
the  arrangements  were  entrusted.  This  body  consisted 
of    Mr.    J.    Williamson    (Chairman),    and    Messrs.    J. 

S.     Edmondson,      E.      H. 

J.         Parrv,       T.       Power, 

A.'j.    Gale,  and    F. 

The     thanks      of 


all  those  who  at'ended  the  dinner 
anil  spent  so  enjoyable  an  evening 
are  due  to  these  gentlemen,  and  to  Mr. 
E.  J.  Mudd'e,  who  worked  with  un- 
tiring zeal  as  secretary  of  the  com- 
mittee. 

Organising  work  is,  however,  nothing 
new  to  Mr.  Muddle,  and  he  is  certainly 
to  be  congratulated  upon  the  success 
which  attended  his  late=t  effort.  Younger 
than  he  looks — in  fact  still  well  on 
the  right  side  of  thirty  — he  is  test 
known  to  members  of  the  cinematograph 
industry  by  reason  of  his  connection 
with  our  contemporary,  The  Bioscope, 
of  which  paper  he  was  successively 
assistant  editor  and  editor  for  some 
three  years  until  a  long  and  serious 
illness  last  summer  brought  down  the 
ban  of  the  docior  upon  his  editorial 
head.  During  part  of  the  time  Mr. 
Muddle  was  assi  tant  editor  rf  The 
Bioscope  he  was  also  editor  of  the 
Domestic  Engineer. 

Debarred  bv  doctor's  orders  from 
accepting  a  position  which  would 
entail  regular  and  perhaps  long  hours 
of  routine  work,  Mr.  Muddle  rented 
an  office  at  16,  Cecil  Court — or"  Flicker 
Alley"  as  it  is  known  to  moving 
picture  men  throughout  the  world  — 
and  commenced  business  on  his  own 
account  as  a  free  lance  technical  journal- 
ist and  advertisement  agent.  He  is 
the  London  representative  of  the  Moving  Picture  World  (New 
York),  Le  Cou'rier  Cinematographique  (Paris),  La  Cinemato- 
grafia  Italiana  (Turin),  and  other  cinematograph  trade  journils. 


Using  the  nam  de  flume  "Oliver  Hudson,"  Mr.  Muddle  is  a 
frequent  contributor  to  many  papers  more  or  les  connected  with 
the  moving  picture  indust  y,  and  his  series  of  articles  entitled 
"Cinematograph  Progress  "  which  appear  in  this  magazine  from 
time  to  time  are  as  interesting  as  ihey  ate  informative.  Mr.  Muddle 
finds  tim-s  ti  write  books.  Picture  Plays  and  How  to  Write 
Them,  of  which  he  is  joint 
author  and  editor,  was  recently 
reviewed  in  these  columns.  He  has, 
we  believe,  two  other  books  in  pre- 
paration, one  in  connection  with  the 
cinematograph  industry  and  one  on  the 
subject  of  advertising. 

A   New  Venture. 

Lastly  and  perhap;  most  interesting 
is  the  announcement  that  the  subject 
of  our  sketch  will  hold  the  editorial 
reins  of  a  new  paper,  Film  Stories, 
which  will  shortly  nmke  its  appear- 
ance. Briefly  Film  Stories  is  des- 
cribed as  a  higi  grade  magazine 
programme  for  cinematograph  theatres, 
the  idea  being  to  enable  the  shosvman 
to  sell — at  the  nimble  penny — a  pro- 
gramme which  will  contain  descriptions 
in  popular  short  story  form  of  all  the 
films  which  are  being  shown  in  his  hall 
during  the  week,  or  rather  during  the 
half-week.  In  other  words  there  will 
be  a  change  of  magazine  as  often  as 
there  is  a  change  of  films.  Mr.  Muddle 
tells  us  he  has  already  engaged  a 
i-taff  ot  experienced  short  stoiy  writers 
who  will  view  and  "write-up"  every 
film  released.  Thus  no  matter  what 
films  may  be  included  in  a  showman's 
programme  his  requirements  so  far  as 
the  magazine  is  concerned  will  be 
satisfied.  The  scheme  is  full  of 
promise  from  every  point  of  view, 
and  showmen  will  no  doubt  be  keen 
to  learn  full  details  of  this  new  venture. 
It  is  certainly  original  in  its  conception,  and  ought  to  be  highly 
successful,  for  it  is  just  what  the  great  public  who  visit  cinerrato- 
graph  theatres  have  been  looking  lor. 


E.    J.    MUDDLE. 
Cranboum   Studios 


A  THEATRE  SHOWING  ONLY  BIBLICAL  FILMS. 

N  Minneapolis  there  is  a  theatre,  the  Milo,  that 
shows  nothing  but  Biblical  films.  It  shows 
all  of  them  it  can  get,  it  shows  every  night, 
and  its  patrons  won't  have  anything  else. 
"The  Deluge,"  "  Mordecai  and  Esther," 
"  Joseph  and  his  Coat,"  "  Cain  and  Abel,"  "  The  Life 
of  Moses,"  "  Saul  and  David,"  "  The  Marriage  of 
Esther,"  have  all  been  shown.  A  majority  Off  Ihe 
patrons  of  the  Milo  are  Jews,  many  of  them'  Russian 
immigrants  newly  arrived.  They  take  their  wives  and 
sons  and  daughters  to  the  theatre,  confident  they  will 
not  be  ashamed  of  what  is  shown.  They  believe  in 
having  their  children  see  what  their  forefathers  had  to 
contend  with,  and  what  kind  of  men  and  women  their 
ancestors  were. 

It  is  remarkable  how  proud  the  older  ones  are—' 
loyal   to    their   race    history,    says    Motography.      The 
very  appearance  of  Moses  on   (he  canvas  is  the  signal 
for    wild    applause    that    often    continues    for    several 

Now  that  the  SPORTING  SEASON  is  in  full  swin^,  book  the 
exclusive  rights  of  our  "WILD  STAG  HUNT  ON  EXMOOR," 
Walturdaw  Exclusive  No.  4. 


minutes.  Enthusiasm  is  not  lacking  here.  Like  old 
friends  the  famous  Biblical  subjects  are  greeted — 
j  useph,   Cain,   Abel,  Noah,   Esther,  Mordecai. 

In  the  drama  of  "  Moses,"  for  instance,  the  great 
Jewish  leader  pilots  the  chosen  people  over  the  Red 
Sea.  Moses  lifts  up  his  rod  and  stretches  out  his  hand 
over  the  Red  Sea,  and  lo  !  it  divides,  and  the  Children 
of  Israel  go  on  dry  land  through  the  midst  of  the 
mm.  But  "the  hosts  of  Pharaoh,"  the  Egyptians, 
pursue,  and  go  in  after  them  to  the  midst  of  the  sea, 
even  all  Pharaoh's  horses,  his  chariots,  and  his  horse- 
men. 

"  When  we  opened  the  theatre,"  says  the  manager, 
"  we  had  a  couple  of  films  of  Bible  stories,  and  we  had 
packed  houses  by  the  end  of  the  week.  It  surprised 
me.  I  believed  it  necessary  to  put  on  something  sen- 
sational, something  new.  But  I  have  learned  better. 
I  run  as  many  Bible  films  as  I  can  get — with  shows 
every  night.     The  people  won't  accept  anything  else." 

To  pack  your  house  every  night  and  overflow  your  pay  box — 
book  "  THE  COURSE  OF  TRUE  LOVE,"  released  January 
22nd.  Length  3,000  feet.  Miss  Asta  Nielsen  in  the  title  role 
Walturdaw  Exclusive. 


18 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,   1912. 


A     DISTINGUISHED     CHAIRMAN. 


BRIEF     APPRECIATION     OI<     SIR     ERNEST     SHACKLETON,     C.  V.  O. 


^■^  4¥  medium  height,  broad,  square-set  shoulders, 
I   1  I     a   swinging  sailor-like  gait,   and  above  all   a 
lace,  strong,  purposeful,  and  full  of  character, 
clear-rut    leatures    and     deep-set,  thoughtful 
eyes:   this    is   a   pen    portrait    of    Sir    Ernest 
Shackleton,  the  great  Antarctic  explorer. 

A  few  brief  minutes  in  his  company  and  you  learn 
something  of  the  personality  of  the  num.  His  short, 
sharp  staccato  sentences  uttered  in  reply  to  one's 
questions  reveal  the  man  born  to  command.  His 
thoughtful  eyes  are  those  of  the  thinker  and  the 
philosopher  ;  but  the  light  of  enthusiasm  which  creeps 
into  them  as  he  speaks  indicates  the  man  of  action. 

A  Man  of  Temperament. 

As  he  strides  up  and  down  his  room  one  also  discovers 
that  Sir  Ernest  is  a  man  of  temperament.  Then  it  is 
you  realise,  as  you  look  at  the  strong,  purposeful  mouth, 
that  the  man  before  you  was  the  real  mainspring  of  the 
great  Antarctic  Expedition  which  he  so  successfully  led. 
His  was  the  achievement;  his  the  lion  share  of  the 
credit  due.  On  the  quarter-deck  we  have  the 
commander  ;  in  private  life,  a  man  of  a  different  stamp. 
At  a  public  gathering — at  the  dinner  of  the 
Cinematograph  Trade  at  the  Hotel  Cecil  for  instance — 
we  have  the  genial  man  of  affairs,  the  accomplished 
reconteur,  the  practised  speaker.  A  man,  very 
evidently  used  to  handling  men  and  holding  their 
attention. 

A  Distinguished  Chairman. 

As  chairman  of  this  great  gathering  of  the  light  and 
leading  of  the  moving  picture  industry,  Sir  Ernest  added 
distinction  to  a  notable  occasion.  He  spoke  without 
apparent  effort ;  he  spoke  well,  and  not  a  sound  inter- 
rupted him  as  he  told  of  his  experiences  as  lecturer  with 
the  cinematograph.  He  made  us  laugh  with  him  as  he 
recalled  some  of  the  incidents  ot  his  tour,  and  roused  us 
to  enthusiasm  when  he  claimed — in  all  modesty,  and 
with  just  the  flicker  of  a  smile  upon  his  face — that  he  and 
his  colleagues  were  of  the  cinematograph  trade,  if  not  in  it, 
as  they  were  the  first  to  lake  and  show  films  made 
amongst  the  ice  packs. 

A  Career  full  of  Variety. 

The  insignia  of  the  Victorian  Order  suspended  from 
his  collar,  and  the  number  and  variety  of  the  Orders 
resting  upon  his  coat  lapel  reminded  one — if  one  needed 
reminding  —  that  kings  and  princes  had  delimited  in 
honouring  this  brave  Englishman,  and  the  incidents  of 
his  crowded  career  flashed  before  one  as  he  continued 
speaking.  Thirty-eight  years  of  age,  he  was  educated  at 
Dulwich  College,  and  it  is  interesting  to  recall  that  Mr. 
Bromhead,  of  the  Gaumont  Company,  was  at  school 
with  him.  Aft  r  schooldays  Sir  Ernest  joined  the 
Merchant  Service,  and  voyaged  all  over  the  world  ;  four 
times  round  it  in  every  sort  of  ship — sailing  ships, 
transports,  cable-carrying  ships,  tramps,  liners.  He 
lived  ashore  in  foreign  countries  ;  received  a  commission 
in  the  Naval  Reserve  ;  and  was  attached  to  the  Navy 
for  the  purposes  of   the   National  Antarctic  Expedition, 


1901,  being  third  lieutenant  of  that  Expedition.  He 
accompanied  Capt.  Scott  on  the  Eurthest  South  journey, 
returning  in  1903.  He  fitted  out  the  Argentine  Antarctic 
Relief  Expedition,  and  received  the  thanks  of  the 
Argentine  Government,  and  also  fitted  out  the  "  Dis- 
covery "  Relief  Expedhion  of   1903. 

As  a  Journalist. 

Eor  a  time  he  devoted  his  energies  to  journalism,  and 
became  assistant  editor  of  the  "  Royal  Magazine."  Re- 
signing this  position  he  was  appointed  Secretary  and 
Treasurer  of  the  Royal  Scottish  Geographical  Society.  In 
1906  he  contested  Dundee  at  the  General  Election.  Then 
he  became  personal  assistant  to  William  Beardmore,  of 
Beardmore,  Ltd.,  battleship  builders,  and  organised  the 
British  Antarctic  Expedition  of  1907,  and  reached 
what  was  then  furthest  South,  97  geographical  miles 
from  the  South  Pole.  The  expedition  also  reached  the 
South  Magnetic  Pole  for  the  first  time.  Sir  Ernest  was 
made  a  member  of  the  Victorian  Order  in  1907,  and  on 
his  return  lectured  throughout  Europe,  the  United  States 
and  Canada.  He  was  made  Commander  of  the 
Victorian  Order,  and  knighted  in  November,  1909. 

A  Much  Be-medalled  Man. 

Sir  Ernest  Shackleton  must  be  one  of  the  most  be- 
medalled  men  in  the  Empire.  He  holds  the  gold  medals 
of  the  Royal  Geographical  Societies  of  England,  Scot- 
land, and  Newcastle.  He  has  the  King's  Polar  medal 
with  two  clasps,  and  gold  medals  of  Germany,  Italy, 
France,  Russia,  Sweden,  Denmark,  Norway,  Chicago, 
New  York,  Philadelphia,  Washington,  Antwerp, 
Brussels,  and  Frankfort.  His  Orders  include:  Com- 
mander of  the  Crown  of  Italy,  Commander  of  St.  Anne 
of  Russia,  Officier  Legion  d'Honneur  of  France, 
Danebrog  of  Denmark,  St.  Olav  of  Norway,  North 
Star  of  Sweden,  and  the  Crown  of    Prussia,  Germany. 


Awfu'. 

Manager  (to  North-countryman  leaving  hall):  Have 
you  enjoyed  the  pictures,  Sir  ? 

First  Timer  :  Aye,  mon,  they're  champion,  but  I'm 
sorry  for  that  ther'  chap  Foolshead. 

Manager  :   How's  that,  don't  you  think  he's  funny  ? 

First  Timer  :  I  do  that,  but  t'  think  he's  got  t'  go  all 
through  that  bashing  aboot  agen  at  th'  second  house,  it's 
awfu',  I  wouldna' be  him  for  summat. — Our  News. 


The  bioscope  does  exactly  the  same  for  the  country  as  the 
troubadours  ard  jugglers  did  in  olden  times.  The  villagers  who 
see  these  films  take  it  all  in  greedily,  and  fill  their  souls  with  all  the 
romance  they  are  capable  of.  Would  they  get  so  much  out  of 
books  which  they  never  read  ?  The  bioscope— apart  from  its  other 
merits —  is  a  wonderful  auxiliary  of  the  sportsman,  and  the  world 
ofspoit -w  uld  be  very  ungrateful  indeed  to  look  at  it  with  con- 
tempt.— The  Field. 


The  Essinay  Company  announce  that  at  present  they  have  a  very 
large  stock  of  scenarios  on  hand,  yet  to  be  produced,  and  will  not 
solicit  any  more  for  several  months.  Due  notice  will  be  given 
when  buying  is  resumed.  In  the  meantime,  contributors  ar ; 
kindly  asked  not  to  forward  scenarios. 


May,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


19 


CHAIRMAN     OF      THE      CINEMATOGRAPH     TRADE 

DINNER. 


SIR    ERNEST    SHACKLETON, 

C.V.O.,    F.R.G.S. 


20 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,    1912. 


WILLIAMSON 
HOUSE 


WILLIAMSONS 

STAR    FILM    SERVICE. 

All  Films  are  passed  by  the  Williamson  Board 
of  Censors  before  being  included  in  a  pro- 
gramme, and  the  utmost  care  is  taken  to  insure  that 
only  the  best  Films  on  the  market  are  included. 
PriceRight.  FilmsRight.  ServiceRight. 

ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT. 

Williamson  Cinematograph  Cameras,  Pri  ters, 
and  Perforators  are  known,  used,  and  appre- 
ciated by  moving  picture  men  throughout  the 
world.  Machines  for  use  in  tropical  climates 
are  a  specialite.  New  Art  Catalogue  is  now 
ready  and  will  be  sent,  post  free,  on  request. 
Special  developing  plant  designed  to  suit 
peculiar  circumstances  and  climate. 


SALES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Projectors,  Rewind. rs,  Tickets,  Carbons,  In- 
destructible Announcement  Slides,  and  all 
Accessories  supplied  at  lowest  prices.  We  also 
undertake  contracts  for  the  complete  furnishing 
of  Picture  Theatres,  and  no  inquiry  is  too  large 
and  none  too  small. 

FILM    PRINTING 
and     DEVELOPING. 

Local  Topicals  and  Industrial  Films  arranged 
for  and  taken  upon  the  shortest  possible  notice. 
Operators  and  Cameras  always  ready.  Special 
titles  and  Lantern  Slides  made  to  order 
promptly.  Every  description  of  Trade  Work 
undertaken.  Amateurs'  Films  developed  and 
printed.     Williamson  Quality  Always. 


WILLIAMSON    KINEMATOGRAPH    CO.,    LTD., 

28,  Denmark  Street,  Charing  Cross  Road,  LONDON,  W.C. 

'Phone:    Central  7393.  'Grans:  "  Kinetogram,  London." 


May,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


21 


CINEMATOGRAPH     AND 
CRIME. 

The    Question    Raised    in    Parliament. 

The  question  of  film  censorship  was  briefly  referred 
to  in  the  House  of  Commons  on  April  22,  when  Mr. 
Silvester  Home  asked  the  Home  Secretary  whether  his 
attention  had  been  drawn  to  the  statements  made  by  the 
Hull  stipendiary  magistrate  that  there  had  recently  been 
an  extraordinary  increase  in  juvenile  crime  traceable  to 
melodramatic  films  shown  at  picture  palaces,  and  the 
evidence  of  the  detective  tracing  to  this  cause  the  crime 
of  four  schoolboys,  who  purchased  revolvers  and  com- 
mitted burglaries  in  Hull  ;  whether  he  had  evidence 
from  magistrates  or  police  in  other  places  confirming 
these  statements  as  to  the  vicious  effect  of  certain  cine- 
matograph exhibits  ;  whether  he  proposed  to  institute 
an  inquiry  into  this  matter  and  introduce  legislation 
dealing  with  the  evil. 

Mr.  McKenna :  I  am  informed  by  the  Chief  Con- 
stable of  Hull  that  the  four  boys  recently  charged  with 
housebreaking  stated,  while  they  were  in  the  remand 
home,  that  their  proceedings  were  suggested  by  cine- 
matograph pictures,  and  that  the  stipendiary  magistrate 
remarked  that  he  wondered  whether  the  increase  of 
juvenile  crime  that  had  been  noticed  was  in  any  part  due 
to  the  influence  of  these  pictures.  One  (  r  two  other 
reports  have  been  received  at  the  Home  Office  which 
suggest  that  films  representing  crime  are  sometimes 
exhibited    which   have  a  demoralising  effect   on   voungf 


persons  who  see  them.  I  recently  received  a  deputation 
from  the  principal  makers  of  films  on  the  question  of  the 
formation  of  a  committee  by  the  manufacturers  with  the 
duty  of  examining  all  films  before  they  are  used.  I 
understand  such  a  committee  is  in  course  of  formation 
and  I  am  not  without  hope  that  good  may  result.  I  do 
not  see  my  way  to  propose  legislation  for  the  establish- 
ment of  an  official  censorship. 

Sir  G.  Parker :  Will  the  right  hon.  gentleman  give 
the  same  consideration  to  the  low-class  literature  which 
is  distributed  so  widely,  and  is  even  more  pernicious  in 
its  effect  ?     (Hear,  hear.) 

Mr.  McKenna:  Yes  sir. 


SELIG  ANIMAL  RANCH. 

Mr.  A.  A.  Davi=on,  who  is  the  Chicago  manager  of  the  Selig 
Company,  is  at  present  over  here  on  a  visit  ;  he  gives  some 
interesting  particulars  about  Selig's  new  Zoological  Ranch,  which 
is  situated  at  Los  Angeles.  Messrs.  Seligs  have  been  forced  to 
start  this  hugh  establishment,  which  occupies  more  than  four 
hundred  acres,  in  order  to  cope  with  the  demand  for  their  "  animal 
films." 

Most  of  the  animals  bred  on  the  rinch  are  used  in  the  cinema 
bu  iness,  but  some  are  sold  to  circuses  and  menageries.  Mean- 
while the  ranch  itself  is  being  planned  out  by  expert  landscape 
gardeners  and  will  soon  be  thrown  open  to  the  public  of  Los 
Angeles  as  a  Zoological  Park. 


We  hear  that  Mr.  Ernest  Leths,  of  8,  Cumbert^n  Street,  London, 
W.,  is  doing  a  big  business  wi'h  feature  films.  His  customers,  who 
include  many  West  End  and  suburban  theatres,  are  demanding  more 
:md  more  big  films,  such  as"  Blackmail  ''and  "  Her  Vengeance." 


THE  IDEAL 
DISINFECTANT 

FOR 

CINEMA 
THEATRES. 


IGNIC 

Reg4 


EQUAL   TO   EAU   DE   COLOGNE. 


The  last  word  in  Hygiene  as  supplied  to  purification  of  the  air 
by  spraying.  Used  in  conjunction  with  our  Pneumatic  Sprayer 
it    forms    the    best,    cheapest,    pleasantest,    and    most    effective 

DISINFECTANT  FOR  CINEMA  THEATRES. 


Manufactured  only  by 


The  PINER-LIN  CO., 

Fishponds,  Bristol. 


Awarded    Two 

Certificates  by  the 

Institute  of 

Hygiene. 


Price,  cash  with  order,   19/-,  Carriage  Paid  anywhere,  complete. 


22  THE    CINEMA.  May,  1912. 


THE 


MAN  WHO  CANT  AFFORD 

TO     MAKE     A     MISTAKE     IS     THE 
MAN    WHO     SHOULD     INVEST    IN 

THE  KALEE  PROJECTOR. 

THE  PERFECT  CONSTRUCTION 
OF  THIS  MACHINE  ENSURES 
ITS    PURCHASE     BEING     A 

SAFE    INVESTMENT 

AND   

NOT    A    SPECULATION. 


Send  for  Descriptive  Catalogue  to 

THE  M rill  Of  MTIIDU  FILM  service, 


NEW  CENTURY 


Llf    ULIi  iUIII   2  fc  4*  mm  Sl    lECDS- 

Or  48,  Rupert  Street,  LONDON,  W. 


May,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


23 


J    MISS    FLORENCE    TURNER 


JEAN,    VITAGRAPH     DOG. 


1  he    People's    Popular    Piayers. 

No.   4.— MEMBERS    OF    THE    VITAGRAPH    STOCK    COMPANY. 


24  THE     CINEMA.  May,  1912. 


THE    FILM    RENTING    EXPERTS. 


FILMS 

LIMITED. 

Head     Office  : 

18  &  20  MANCHESTER  STREET,  LIVERPOOL. 

A.    T.    WRIGHT,    Managing    Director. 
Branches : 
23      CECIL     COURT,  ¥    ONFlON  Xh?    C*  Telephone  5783  Central. 


Telephone  6782  Central. 
Telegrams  Films,  Liverpool. 


CHARING     CROSS     ROAD,  Jw\^l  1  JL/V-rl ^  j  W  a  V>>a        Telegrams  Filmitted,  London. 

DLAND     CHAMBERS,"  -NFWrA^TIF    ON    TYNF  Telephone  2021  Central. 

17     WESTGATE     ROAD,  lid  ¥?  \//\lJ  I  LiEi"V/ll~  1   IllL.        Telegrams  Animated,  Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

8     WYNDHAM     ARCADE,  _ /""*  A  D  Pi  1 1**  K"  Telephone  3440  Cardiff. 

ST.     MARY'S     STREET,  \*sJ*m**MJ  ll     T  ■       Telegrams  Animated,  Cardiff. 

Telephone  3107. 
Telegrams  Films,  Belfast. 


35     HIGH     STREET, f\¥T  I     IT  A  ^HP  Telephone  3107. 


16     DOLIER     STREET,  T\\]  RI     |M 


Telegrams  ^Films,  Dublin. 


The    PREMIER    and    EUREKA     FILM    SERVICE    are    par    excellence. 


Provincial   Agents   by  appointment  for  the 

ERNEMANN 

IMPERATOR. 


May,  19  i  2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


25 


MEMS. 


T  the  second  annual  general  meeting  of  the  London  and 
Provincial  Electric  Theatres,  Ltd.,  the  report  pre- 
sented showed  a  trading  profit  of  £15,892  16s.  iod.  A 
sum  of  £3,250  was  placed  to  reserve,  and  a  final 
dividend  at  the  rate  of  20  per  cent,  per  annum  for  the 
second  half  year  was  declared,  making  a  total  of  15  per 
cent,  for  the  year.  It  was  decided  to  increase  the  company's 
capital  by  issuing  an  additional  30,000  20  per  cent,  participating 
preference  shares  of  10  per  cent,  each  at  a  premium  of  2S.  6d.  per 
share 


NEW  COMPANIES. 


Empress  Electric  Theatre  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,   in    £1 
share?.     Private  company.     71,  Lincolns  Inn  Fields,  \V,C. 

Sale  Public  Hall,  Ltd. — Capital  £5,000,  in  ^1  shares.   Private 
•company. 

Windsor    Electric    Theatre.,    Ltd.— Capital  £1,000,  in   £1 
-shares.     Private  companv. 


C  &    G. 

Cinema    and   G£iveral    Supply    Co., 

FILM     HIRERS,     ETC., 

49,   WHYTEVILLE    ROAD,    FOREST    GATE,    LONDON,  E. 


Telegrams  :  "  CINESUPPLY,  LONDON." 

Telephones:  3217  GERRARD.     Night  and 

Sunday:    STRATFORD    459. 


SINGLE    FILMS    OR    COMPLETE    PROGRAMMES    FROM    10s.    PER 
1,000  FEET  PER  WEEK,  TWO  CHANGES. 

SEND  for  List  of    recommended    Topliners  with  vacant  dates 
and  terms. 

-yiGOMAR    v.   NICK    CARTER,   3,600    ft.,    free   May  20.    £5  week. 

■Mm  SINS    OF    THE    FATHERS,    2,600    ft.,    FOUR    DAREDEVILS, 

2,600  ft.,  3  days  20s.,  week  40s.  each.  IN  THE  GRIP  OF 
ALCOHOL,  2,600  ft.,  LADY  MARY'S  LOVE,  2,300  ft.,  SIEGE 
OF    CALAIS,  2,000  ft.,  3  days   15s.,  week  30s.  each, 

■MIANAGERS'    AND    OPERATORS'    TABLETS   (washable)   6d.   each 
IWI         DESCRIPTIVE    STICKERS,  six  varieties,  6d.  100      MONTHLY 

INDEXED    DIARIES,  Id.  each.     Specimens  of  above  free  to 

any  Manager. 

"  £*   AND  G."  FOUNTAIN  PENS,   Met.  gold  nib,  with   Patent  Clip 
^^      or  Leather  Safety  Pocket,  2s.  6d. 

E  MPLOYMENT  BUREAU.— Agency  for  Vocalists  and  other  Artists 
^™  for  Picture  Theatres. 

y^lNEMA  AND  GENERAL  SUPPLY  CO.,  49,  Whyteville  Road,  Forest 
^  Gate,    E.       TELEGRAMS:    "Cinesupply,    London."       TELE- 

PHONE: Gerrard  3217  and  Stratford  459. 


Bishops  Stortford  Electric  Co.,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,500,  in  £1 
shares.   Private  company. 

Hamilton  Baine,  Ltd. — Capital  £100,  in  2s.  shares. 

Castleford  Express  Picture  Palace,  Ltd. — Capital  £8oo,  in 
£1  shares.     Private  company, 

Warrior  Square  Picture  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000,  in 
£1  shares.     Private  company.     17,  Coleman-street,  E.C. 

Brackley  Empire  Electric  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,000, 
in  £1  shares.  Private  company.  Brackley  Electric  Theatre, 
Factory  Lane,  Brackley,  Manchester. 

Rumworth  Electric  Theatre,  Ltd. — Capital  £2,500,  in  £1 
shares.     Private  company, 

Standard  Enterprises  Ltd.— Capital  £2,000,  in  £1  shares. 
Private  company.     9,  Queen-street,  Oldham. 

East  London  Picture  Theatre,  Ltd. — £6,000,  in  5,000  pre 
ferred  ordinary  shares  of  £1,  and  4,000  deferred  of  5s.  62,  London 
Wall,  E.C. 


Cinema  (Tonbridge  Wells) 
company. 


£2,000,   in  £1  shares.     Private 
shares . 


Star    Circuit    Electric    Palaces. — £25,000,    in    1 
199,  Piccadilly,  W. 

Brixton     Proprietory,    Ltd.,    Theatrical. — /"2,ooo,    in    /i 
shares. 

S.  and  E.,   Synd  ,  Ltd. — £3,000,  in  £1  shares. 

Biofix  (Southend),  Ltd. — £2,000,  in  £1  shares. 

Electra  Films,   Ltd. — £6,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private  company. 
6,  Broad  Street  Place,  E.C. 

Alexander  Halls    (Midlands),    Ltd. — £500,    in    £1    shares. 
Private  company. 

Don  Picture  Palace  Co.,  Ltd. — £5,000,  in  £1  shares.  Private 
company. 

Bolton    Picture    Hall    Co.,    Ltd. — £5,000    in    £1     shares. 
Private  company. 

Devizes    Entertainments  Co.,    Ltd. — £1,000   in    £1    shares. 
Priva;e  company. 

Brixton   Palladium,    Ltd. — £15,000   in    £1    shares.      Private 
company. 

Empire,  Mile  End,   Ltd  — £5,000  in  £1  shares.     Private  com- 
pany.    95,  Mile  End  Road,  E. 

Denton  Palace,  Ltd. — £2,500  in  £1  shares.    Private  company. 

Omnium    Electric    Palaces,     Ltd. — £5,000    in    £1     shares. 
Private  company.      Finsbury  Court,  Finsbury  Pavement,  E.C. 

Palladium  Palaces,  Ltd. — £10,000  in  9,000  pref.  ord.  shares 
of  £1,  and  20,000  def.  shares  of  is.  each.     Private  company. 

Shows,  Ltd. — £1,000  in  £1  shares.     Private  company. 

Stone  Cinema  Co.,  Ltd.— £500   in  £1   shares.     Private  com- 
pany. 


L.C.C.  PATTERN. 


SLIDING  STENCIL  CUT  FRONT. 


For  any  llluminant. 
Opal  or   Red    Ulass. 

(As  shown.) 

Emergency  Exit   -  11/- 
Exit 10/- 

Without  fancy  work. 
Emergency  Exit   -  10/- 
Exit    -----    9/- 

Any  other  signs  quoted  for. 
Discount  for  quantities. 


MANSELL,  Ltd.,  13a.  Cecil  Court, 


,Phone  8982  City 


w.c. 


26 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  1912. 


AV 


OI 


The  greatest  Film  ever 
made    in    England. 


May,   191 2. 


THE     CINEMA. 


USUAL  SPLENDID  PUBLICITY  MATTER. 
UNUSUAL  PRESS    CAMPAIGN. 


Full  particulars 
as  to  Exclusive 
Rights  from  the 

NEW  CENTURY 
FILM  SERVICE 

LTD. 

2  &  4,  Quebec  St. ,    48,  Rupert  St. , 
LEEDS.  LONDON,  W. 

Agent  for  Northern  Counties— W.  L.  REED, 
148,    Westgate    Road,   Newcastle-on -Tyne. 


28 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  19  i  2. 


THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    TRADE    AT 

DINNER. 


IE  large  attendance  at  the  fourth  annual  trade 


dinner  at  the  Hotel  Cecil  was  a  clear  indica- 
tion of  its  growing  popularity.  Held  under 
the  auspices  of  the  Manufacturers,  Renters, 
and  Exhibitors'  Associations  in  conjunction 
with  the  Trade  Protection  Society,  a  company  num- 
bering close  on  four  hundred  was  presided  over  by  Sir 
Ernest  Shackleton,  C.V.O.,  the  famous  Antarctic 
explorer. 

Among  those  present  were  Sir  George  Marks,  M.P., 
Messrs.  Walter  Reynolds,  L.C.C.,  J.  Avery,  E.  M. 
Barker,   W.  G.    Barker,    F.    W.    Baker,  P.   M.    Beck, 

E.  H.  Bishop,  E.  C.  Bishop,  W.  Blake,  A.  H. 
Bloomfield,  H.  A.  Browne,  H.  K.  Browne,  J.  J.  Bye, 
J.  Cabourn,  Sidney  Carter,  G.  H.  Cricks,  Paul  H. 
Cromelin,  A.  V.  Cross,  F.  Cross,  W.  Day,  H.  Denton, 
R.  E.  Edmondson,  A.  A.  Einstein,  G.  Einstein, 
W.  Fenning,  L.  Firmin,  H.  Tucker,  L.  de  Freece, 
A.  J.  Gale,  E.  V.  Gleinster,  G.  W.  Grant,  George  Gray, 

F.  R.  Griffiths,  H.  Hart,  H.  Harris,  F.  Hayden, 
L.  Herman,  E.  T.  Heron,  Rev.  T.  Home,  E.  Hubsch, 

G.  W.  Jones,  R.  T.  Jupp,  F.  Kenway,  J.  Lambert,  A. 
Lovesay,  C.  W.  Lovesay,  J.  B.  MacDowell,  H.  Mason, 
E.  H.  Montagu,  E.  J.  Muddle  (Honorary  Secretary),  B. 
Nichols,J.Parfrey,J.  Parry, E.Poole, J.  Poole,  F.  Phillips, 
W.  J.  Phillips,  Matt  Raymond,  T.   Redfern,  P.  Renton, 

E.  Reed,  J.  Rigby,  J.  Ruffell,  R.  Samuels,  A.  St.  John, 
S.  R.  Schlentheim,  L.  Schlentheim,  J.  C.  Squier,  H.  A. 
Spoor,  H.  Silverman,  H.  Samuelson,  J.  W.  Smith, 
H.  Smith,  F.  W.  Ogden  Smith,  L.  Solenne,  P.  E. 
Stow,  Rev.  Tinsley,  H.  G.  Titchener,  G.  H.  Turner, 
C.  V.  Tucker,  J.  Tettlow,  W.  Turner,  L.  Vint,  H, 
Walker,  J.  D.  Walker,  Low  Warren,  F.  W.  Wheatcroft, 
J.  Williamson,   H.   Wood,  F.  Weisker,    Henry   Wood, 

F.  Walsch,  etc. 

Following  the  loyal  toast,  Sir  Ernest  read  telegrams 
regretting  non-attendance  from  Mr.  Charles  Urban  (who 
had  undergone  a  serious  operation  that  morning)  whom 
all  wished  a  speedy  recovery,  and  from  Mr.  E.  S. 
Williams. 

Mr.  R.  T.  Jupp  in  proposing  the  toast  of  the  "  Parlia- 
mentary and  Municipal  Authorities  "  said  it  was  highly 
satisfactory  that  the  public  realised  it  attended  cinemato- 
graph theatres  in  perfect  safety.  They  held  the  public's 
confidence,  and  that  was  most  satisfactory.  The  forma- 
tion of  a  strong  exhibitors'  association  ought  to  ensure 
more  uniform  treatment  by  local  authorities.  Referring 
to  the  proposed  censorship  of  films,  Mr.  Jupp  desired 
that  moving  pictures  should  always  exercise  the  influ- 
ence for  good  that  they  undoubtedly  possessed.  There 
had  been,  however,  a  slight  downward  tendency,  which 
must  be  checked,  and  nothing  done  to  hinder  the  onward 
march  of  cinematography. 

Sir  George  Marks,  M.P.,  said  it  was  a  privilege  to 
attend  such  a  gathering  as  that  at  which  he  had  the 
honour  of  appearing  that  night,  and  especially  under  the 
chairmanship  of  one  who  had  given  to  the  world  those 
splendid  educational  pictures  which  had  already  won 
high  fame.  Educational  they  were  in  the  highest 
degree,  and  as  such  as  they  were  of  the  greatest  value. 


With  regard  to  the  proposed  censorship,  Sir  George  said 
he  was  in  agreement  with  any  scheme  that  would  tend 
to  uplift  an  industry  which  had  already  proved  itself  to 
be  the  greatest  educational  force  in  the  whole  world. 

Mr.  Walter  Reynolds  said  the  London  County  Council, 
and  municipal  authorities  generally,  were  more  than 
favourably  inclined  to  the  moving  picture  industry. 

Sir  Ernest  Shackleton  in  proposing  the  toast  of  "  The 
Trade"  referred  to  the  series  of  films  of  the  Polar 
Expedition,  and  the  wonderful  progress  which  cinema- 
tography had  made.  As  showing  the  interest  taken  by 
the  Trade  in  its  annual  dinner,  the  second  year  250 
attended,  the  third  293,  and  this  year  the  figures  reached 
362.  The  Chairman  then  made  a  feeling  reference  to 
the  disaster  which  had  saddened  the  hearts  of  all  that 
day — the  loss  of  the  Titanic. 

Mr.  P.  H.  Cromelin  responded  on  behalf  of  the  manu- 
facturers, Mr.  J.  Lambert  for  the  renters,  and  Mr.  E. 
M.  Barker  for  the  exhibitors.  He  hoped  every  show- 
man would  support  the  Exhibitors'  Association. 

"  Our  Guests  "  was  submitted  by  Mr.  J.  Williamson, 
and  responded  to  by  the  Rev.  Thomas  Home,  who 
declared  himself  a  convert  to  Sunday  opening. 

The  toast  of  "  The  Chairman  "  was  proposed  by  Mr. 
Reed,  and  briefly  acknowledged  by  the  chairman. 
Other  toasts  followed. 


A    PALATIAL  THEATRE. 

The  Grand  Cinema  de  Luxe  (late  Palladium),  King's  Road. 
Brighton,  has  just  been  opened  by  the  Deputy  Mayor,  Alderman 
Edward  Geere,  J. P.,  assisted  by  Mr.  L.  Schlentheim,  chairman  and 
managing  director  of  Palladium  Palac=s,  Ltd.  The  function  was 
attended  by  a  large  number  of  influential  residents  and  visitors. 
From  the  opening  hour  until  late  in  the  evening  the  theatre,  in 
which  a  continuous  performance  is  given,  was  well  filled,  and  on 
all  sides  could  be  heard  expressions  of  delight  at  the  luxurious 
furnishing  decorations.  The  whole  of  the  ground  floor  from  the 
orchestral  stalls  to  the  back  of  the  pit  stalls  has  a  splendid  rake 
and  a  clear,  uninterrupted  view  of  the  pictures.  The  second  tier 
consists  of  twelve  admirably  placed  boxes,  which  run  parallel  along 
the  sides  of  the  theatre,  finishing  with  a  beautifully  arranged  dress 
circle  and  backed  with  a  gorgeous  palm  court,  which  is  da;ntily 
furnished  and  will  no  doubt  soon  become  a  popular  rendezvous  for 
afternoon  teas.  The  comfort  of  the  patrons  of  the  gallery  has  also 
been  attended  to,  and  they  will  also  have  a  clear  and  uninterrupted 
view  of  the  pictures,  which  are  18  feet  6  inches  wide  and  are  pro- 
jected in  perfect  style. 


A  HIGH-CLASS  TAILORING  ESTABLISHMENT. 

Those  of  our  readers  who  are  desirous  of  having  a  really  good 
tailor  for  both  civil  and  sporting  clothes  at  moderate  prices  cannot 
do  batter  than  go  to  Messrs.  Harry  Hall,  of  207,  Oxford  Street, 
W.,  and  31,  Eldon  Street,  E.C.,  whose  advertisement  appears  in 
this  issue.  This  firm  has  for  many  years  made  a  special  study  of 
the  cutting  and  fitting  of  all  garments  and  guarantee  entire 
satisfaction  in  every  detail,  and  we  are  sure  that  readers  will  be 
more  than  pleased  with  the  value  and  fit  of  all  clothes  they  may 
order.  It  may  be  of  interest  to  foreign  and  colonial  readers  to  know 
that  Messrs.  Harry  Hall  have  a  large  clientele  abroad,  whose  clothes 
are  made  from  measurements  supplied  by  themselves  on  Messrs. 
Harry  Hall's  self-measurement  forms,  which  will  be  sent,  together 
with  patterns  and  price  list  showing  the  latest  styles  of  garments, 
post  free  on  application.  Special  attention  is  drawn  to  their  three- 
guinea  business  suit  and  overcoat,  which  are  the  finest  value 
obtainable.  Messrs.  Harry  Hall  have  been  awarded  ten  gold 
medals  for  the  excellence  of  their  productions,  and  have  a  twenty 
years'  reputation. 


May,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


29 


LONDON  &*.  PROVINCIAL  THEATRES  6-  SITES 
TO  BE- LET- OR.- SOLD. 


Applicants  requiring  further  particulars  and  orders  to  view  any  of  the  properties  mentioned  in  the  subjoined  list 
are  requested  to  quote  the  foli  d  number  attached,  and  be  precise  in  the  information  they  seek.  Applicants  not 
finding  their  requirements  in  this  list'are  invited  to  forward  a  description  of  the  investment  they  are  seeking, 
and  particulars  of  anything  suitable  will  be  forwarded  from  time  to  time  without  charge  by  the  respective  agents. 


For   Scale  of  Charges  for   Advertisements, 
under  this  heading,  apply  to  The  Manager, 
THE  CINEMA  NEWS  &  PROPERTY  GAZETTE, 
LTD.,    21,    NORTH     AUDLEY     STREET,    W 


selection  of  properties  from  the  registers  of 

Messrs.    Harris   &   Gii.low,   Cinematograph    Property   Experts, 

451a,   Oxford   Street,    London,   W. 


LONDON    THEATRES. 


LONDON,  E.— Frontage  20  ft.,  depth  80  ft.  Hold  about  300.  Estab- 
lished Christmas,  1910.  A  going  concern  with  a  lease  of  8  years,  at  the 
low  inclusive  rent  of  £60  per  annum.     Price,  inclusive,  £425.     Fo.   518a 

LONDON,  S.W.— A  smart  little  Theatre  holding  about  300.  Price,  in- 
clusive of  everything,   ,6750.     Fo.   751b 

LONDON,  N.— A  snug  little  Theatre,  built  about  a  year  ago  at  a  cost  of 
about  .£3,500.     Lease  80  years.     Ground  Rent    £85   per  annum.    Holds  about 
650.     Price,   including  everything,   £2,250,    £1,000   of  which  can  remain. 
Fo.    684y 

LONDON  SUBURB,  N.W.— Public  Hall  built  about  4J  years  ago,  31  ft. 
6  in.  frontage,  no  ft.  deep,  holding  about  500.  Price,  freehold,  inclusive 
of  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  £3,500  (a  part  might  remain).  First  floor  let  off 
at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  653b 

LONDON,  N. — Fine  Music  Hall  seating  1,400  and  standing  room.  Price  £3,000, 
for  everything  as  it  stands.  Rent  £925.  Profits  should  easily  reach  £5,000  per 
annum.  A  remarkable  opportunity  to  obtain  possession  and  a  profitable  under- 
taking for  a  small  figure.     Fo.  688b. 

LONDON,  W.— Cinema  Palace,  holding  capacity  400.  Average  takings 
£$i  per  week.  Expenses  about  £30.  Rent  £200.  Exice  £2,000  (which  was 
the  cost  of  the  building  alone),  includes  all  fixtures  and  fittings,  2  pianos, 
organ,  Gaumont  machines,  &c.     A   bargain.     Fo.   8oiy 

LONDON.  WEST-END.— One  of  the  highest  class  small  Theatres  in 
one  of  the  best  main  streets  in  the  West-end  of  London.  Although  only 
holding  about  200,  the  net  profit  is  over  £1,000  per  annum.  Price  for  the 
whole  place  as  a  going  concern,    £1,500.     A  bargain.     Fo.   oo2y 

LONDON.  S.W. — A  newly  built  Theatre,  costing  over  £5,000.  Capacity 
nearly  600.  Takings  last  month,  £220.  .£2,000  cash  and  balance  on  mort- 
gage includes  going  concern  and  everything  of  the  best.  Long  lease. 
Ground   Rent   £250  per  annum.     Fo.  793b 


MIDDLESEX.— Theatre,    seating 
concern.     Fo.   123c 


300.     Rent    £125.     Price    £200.     Goinj 


LONDON.— Heart  of  the  West-end.  Theatre  holding  400,  and  making  a 
net  profit  of  £1,000  per  annum.  A  very  unusual  opportunity  to  acquire  a 
high-class   property.     Price  £1,000  cash,   balance  can  remain.     Fo.   140c 

LONDON,  W  —  Capacity  nearly  400.  Net  profits  £35oa  year.  Tip-up  seats, 
3d.,  6d.  and  gd.  Books  kept,  open  to  every  investigation.  Rent  £175.  A  sound 
and  genuine  concern.     Price  £750.     Fo.  162c _____ 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  S.W. —Theatre  seating  250.  Profit  about  £150  per 
annum.  Rent  £52  on  long  lease.  Price  as  going  concern,  including 
everything,    £150.     Fo.    nic 

LONDON,  N.W.— Going  concern,  busy  spot,  making  a  net  profit  of  ^500 
per  annum.  Seating  capacity  420,  or  if  desirous  of  enlarging  there  is  a 
piece  of  land  at  the  rear  75  ft.  long.  Established  2  years.  Rent  £350  per 
annum.     Lease  17  years.      Fo.    I43cy 

LONDON,  N. — Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  200  with  standing 
room  for  50,  or  could  be  enlarged  to  hold  another  100.  Established  3  years. 
Music  and  Dancing  licences.     Rent  £90  per  annum.     Price  £200.     Fo.    144c 

LONDON,  N.W.— Theatre  seating  600;  plush  tip-up  seats.  Established 
2  years.  Will  cost  about  £300  to  comply  with  L.C.C.  requirements.  Rent 
£150  per  annum.  Price  £200,  including  electric  piano,  organ,  &c.  A 
bargain.      Fo.     149c 

MIDDLESEX.— Theatre  seating  400,  taking  £30  per  week.  Established 
2  years.  Rent  £50  per  annum.  Price  £500,  including  everything.  A 
bargain.      Fo.    I42cy 


LONDON    SITES. 


LONDON,  W.— Crowded  West-end  thoroughfare,  a  Site  capable  of  ac- 
commodating a  very  large  Cinematograph  Theatre  to  seat  about  2,000, 
together  with  room  for  building  about  ten  Shops,  and  an  upper  part  com- 
prising Showrooms  and  Offices.  It  is  computed  that  £8,000  per  annum  net 
profit  will  be  made  from  the  rentals  to  be  derived  from  the  building,  and- 
£8,000  net  profit  from  the  Cinematograph  Theatre.     Fo.  s6iy 

LONDON,  W.— Main  thoroughfare  in  the  midst  of  Theatre  Land.  A 
Cinematograph  Theatre  capable  of  seating  about  1,500  can  be  built, 
together  with  shop  property,  offices,  &c.  A  net  profit  of  ^12,000  per  annum, 
should  easily  be  obtained.  Ground  Rent  ^4,500  per  annum.  Estimated 
cost  of  building  £45,000.     Fo.  762b 

LONDON,  W. — A  Building  Site  about  40  ft.  by  107  ft.,  at  present  com- 
prising two  shops  and  upper  parts  in  about  the  only  crowded  populous 
neighbourhood  in  London  where  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  does  not  at 
present  exist.  Ground  rent  £300  per  annum.  No  premium.  Really  an 
unusual   opportunity.      Fo.   757b 


Gerrard 
5925. 


THE    CAR    MART 


"  Karbargins  " 
London. 


Has  a  Stock  of  over  100  New  and  Secondhand  Cars,  suitable  for  pleasure 
or  business  purposes.  'Phone  your  requirements. 


Special   Agents    for 


METALLURGIQUE,     FIAT,    MERCEDES,     DAIMLER,     A.USTRO- 
DAIMLER,    NAPIER,   &c,    &c. Lowest  London  Prices. 


297-299,    EUSTON    ROAD,    LONDON,    N.W. 


30 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  1912. 


LONDON,  W. —  In  what  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  very  finest  positions 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  A  Building  Site,  90  ft.  by  100  ft.,  with  an 
entrance  from  the  main  road,  25  ft.  by  7.'  ft.,  which  would  form  a  Lounge 
and  Tea  Room.  All  necessary  exits  can  be  arranged,  and  a  net  profit  ot 
about  .£7,000  a  year  should  easily  be  made  from  the  Theatre.  Ground 
Rent  £600  per  annum.  Premium  £3,000  payable  on  completion,  and  £4,500  in 
instalments  spread  over  a  perod  o>  seven  years.     Fo.  657b. 

ISLINGTON.  — Near  the  "Angel,"  having  a  frontage  of  about  40  ft.  and  a 
depth  of  130  ft.,  offering  a  grand  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  handsome 
Theatre  in  which  a  very  large  and  remunerative  business  could  be  done.  Part 
freehold  and  part  leasehold  for  70  years,  the  Ground  Rent  of  which  is  £200  per 
annum.     Price  £7,000.      Fo.  613a. 

STREATHAM. — Main  road,  very  fine  Site  with  a  frontage  of  162  ft.  and 
a  return  frontage  of  232  ft.  Premises  are  already  built  upon  the  property 
and  are  let  to  one  of  the  chief  Banks  at  £250  per  annum,  who  can  be  re- 
tained. A  Cinematograph  Theatre  could  be  arranged  on  the  ether  portion 
of  the  land,  and,  being  in  such  a  populous  neighbourhood,  a  very  large 
business  can  be  done.  Will  be  let  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £400  per  annum,  or 
freehold   £10,200.      Fo.    505a 

CAMDEN  TOWN.— An  excellent  Building  Site  with  about  40  ft.  frontage 
can  be  had  in  the  High-street,  on  lease  for  90  years,  at  a  Ground  rent  ot 
£130  per  annum.     Premium   £1,200.     Fo.  8i3y 

HACKNEY. — In  a  very  fine  position  at  the  junction  of  two  main  streets, 
an  excellent  Site  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  over  i,ooo.  Ground 
Rent   .£250,  per  annum,   lease  99  years.     Fo.  814a 

KING'S  CROSS.— In  the  main  road,  a  good  Site  with  a  frontage  of 
32  ft.,  widening  to  70  ft.,  with  a  depth  of  127  ft.  Ground  Rent  .£380  per 
annum.     Fo.    6i4y 

STRATFORD,  High-street.— An  excellent  Site  in  this  populous 
neighbourhood,  capable  of  erecting  a  Theatre  to  seat  1,500.  Lease  expires 
1063.     Ground    Rent    £70  per    annum.     Price  £2,000.     Fo.    519b 

BOROUGH  HIGH-STREET.— A  Freehold  Site,  capable  of  erecting  a 
Theatre  to  seat  about  1,000.  Frontage  60  ft.,  depth  1:0  ft.  Price  £3,250. 
Extra   land  at   the  side  can  be  added  totalling  8,000  square  ft.     Fo.   721b 

HAMPSTEAD,  High-street.— A  Site,  50  ft.  by  50  ft.,  to  be  let,  in  the 
main   street.     Ground   Rent  £150  per   annum.     Fo.    625b 

CLAPHAM  JUNCTION.— In  the  main  street.  Fine  Site,  50  ft.  by 
100  ft.     Price,   freehold,  £3,000,  might  be  let   on  a  building  lease.     Fo.  S25V 

CLAPHAM,  High-street. — A  noble  corner  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre  or 
Music  Hall,  being  over  one  acre  in  extent.  Buildings  are  now  erected  on 
it,  portion  of  which  could  be  utilised  or  let  off.  Ground  Rent  £1,400. 
Lease  99  years.     The  freehold  will   be  sold.     Fo.    530b 

BRIXTON. — In  the  best  position.  An  exceedingly  good  Site,  suitable  for 
a  Theatre  seating  about  1,500.  Ground  Rent  .£450  per  annum.  Lease  60 
years.     Fo.   731b 

LONDON  SUBURBS,  N.— A  fine  property  suitable  for  Theatre,  capable 
of  seating  about  1,000,  with  room  to  build  two  shops  in  addition.  Ground 
Rent  £150.     Lease  99  years.     Fo.   645b 

EUSTON-RO\D— In  the  best  position,  fine  property  capable  of  erecting 
a  Theatre  with  alterations  only,  existing  property  being  easily  adapted.  A 
Theatre  can  be  arranged  capable  of  seating  about  750.  Rent  £750  per 
annum.     Fo.   546b 

HOLLOWAY-ROAD.— In  the  very  best  position,  a  fine  corner  Site, 
30  ft.  by  93  ft.,  suitable  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  seating  about  650.  A 
very  large  business  can  be  done  in  this  important   position.     Rent  £600. 

Fo.    8jSb 

BRENTFORD,  High-road.— A  fine  Site,  suitable  for  a  Theatre,  frontage 
80  ft.,   depth   250  ft.     Price,   freehold   £2,500.     Fo.   649b 

ACTON.— In  the  main  street,  a  very  excellent  Site,  frontage  42  ft.  6  in., 
depth    100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000.     Fo.  650b 

LONDON,  N.W.  — In  a  very  fine  position  for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre. 
A  Site  capable  of  a  building  to  seat  800  to  1,000,  and  having  two  very  ex- 
cellent frontages  to  the  most  important  roads  in  the  district.  Ground  Rent 
£190.  Premium  £1,600.  A  higher  ground  rent  without  a  premium  might 
be  arranged.     Fo.   563b 

WESTMINSTER.— In  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Houses  of  Parliament. 
A  grand  Site  next  door  to  important  banking  premises,  and  having  a 
frontage  of  104  ft.,  comprising  four  separate  properties  which  can  be 
adapted  for  the  purpose  of  a  Cinematograph  Theatre,  or  a  new  builuing 
could  be  erected.  This  being  situated  in  a  very  thickly  populated  district 
offers  an  unusually  good  opportunity  for  the  erection  of  a  good  going  con- 
cern. Fo-  665  b 

LONDON,  N.— Site  about  74  ft.  by  85  ft.  in  populous  district.  Price  for 
the  freehold,    £2,000,    or  might   be   let  on   building   lease.      Fo.   568b 

NOTTING  HILL  GATE.— Site  35  ft.  by  80  ft.  Lease  7,  14,  or  21  years. 
Ground  Rent   £350.     Close   to  Notting   Hill    Gate  Station.     Fo.    576V 

BROMLEY.— Site  in  an  excellent  position,  15  ft.  3  in.  by  106  ft.  Price 
£2,500. Fo.   676b 

WANDSWORTH.— Excellent  Building  Site  in  a  very  fine  position.  Ihe 
freehold  can  be   obtained  for  £4,500,   the  major  part   of  which    can   remain. 

Fo.   879b 

SOUTH  NORWOOD.— Workshop,  25  ft.  by  100  ft.,  suitable  for  conver- 
sion into  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  56  years.  Ground  Rent  £4  10s. 
Low  price.     Would  be  let   for  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  678b 

TOTTENHAM.— Sit«u  25  ft.  6  in.  by  131  ft.  Lease  93  years.  Price 
£1,650.     A   very  fine  poii'ion.     Fo.  677y 


WEST  HAM.— Site  having  an  area  of  about  10,100  square  ft.  Lease  So 
years.  Ground  Rent  £65  per  annum.  Price,  freehold,  £1,000.  Part  Itt 
off  for  £40  per  annum.     *o.    777b 

BRENTFORD.— Site,   18  tt.  by   259  ft.     Price,   freehold,   £2,500.     Fo.    683V 

MORTLAKE. — Freehold  Site  in  a  very  good  position  where  a  large 
business  could  be  done.     Price  £5,500.     Fb.   582y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.— Site,  34  ft.  by  75  ft.  Lease  about  18  years. 
Rent  £180.     Price   £1,500.     Fo.  88oy 

PLAISTOW. — Site,  50  yards  from  station,  36  ft.  by  90  ft.  Good  position 
for  a  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Lease  99  years.  Ground  Rent  £75  per 
annum,  or  price,    freehold,   £1,500,    part  on   mortgage.     Fo.   780b 

PADDINGTON. — A  very  fine  Site  of  16,000  ft.  At  present  occupied  by  an 
excellent  building  which  could  easily  be  converted.  Will  be  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £700  a  year  with  a  premium,   or   the  freehold  would  be  sold. 

Fo.    770V 

BOW,  E. — In  the  main  road,  trams  pass  the  door.  A  very  good  Site  in 
the  busiest  spot,  42  ft.  frontage  by  112  ft.  6  in.  deep.  Price,  £600. 
A  successful  Theatre  could  be  built  for  about  £2,000,  and  a  mortgage 
could  be  arranged  for  £1,500.  There  is  only  one  other  small  Theatre 
in  the   neighbourhood,   thus  offering   an   excellent  opportunity.     Fo.   673b 

WANDSWORTH-ROAD.—  Two  good  Shops,  easily  adaptable  for 
Theatre,  36  ft.  by  64  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £900.     Fo.  995V 

BETHNAL  GREEN.— Building  Site  in  main  street.  Plans  passed  for 
Theatre  to  seat  580  and  two  Shops.  61  ft.  by  95  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £4,500, 
or  might  be  let  at  a  ground  rent  of  £250  per  annum.     Fo.  796b 

CRICKLEWOOD.—Good  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  87  ft.  by  90  tt. 
Will  be  let  on  building  lease  at  £90  per  annum,  or  freehold  would  be  sold. 
Fo.  896.V 

TOTTENHAM.— Freehold  premises,  28  by  112  ft.  Ground  Rent  £70. 
Price  for   the   lease,   £1,000.      Fo.    8gSb 

GOLDER'S  GREEN. — Prominent  position,  Site  40  ft.  by  100  ft.  Ground 
Rent  of   £70   per  annum   on    long  building  lease.     Fo.   098y 

EALING. — Site  in  very  good  position,  close  to  the  railway  station.  80  ft. 
by  200  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800.     Fo.   799b 

EALING. — Site  in  good  position,  28  ft.  by  90  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £250, 
or  ground   rent   of  £10  per  annum.     Fo.   ioocy 

PALMER'S  GREEN.— Corner  Site  on  the  main  tram  route.  Ground 
Rent  12s.  per  foot.     Fo.    101c 

CHILD'S  HILL.— Good  Site  in  a  first-class  position,  60  ft.  by  100  tt. 
Price  16s.   per  foot.     Fo.   ioicy 

HOUNSLOW.— Main  street.  Site  64  ft.  by  175  ft.  Good  opening  here 
for   a   Theatre.     Price  £1.200  for  the  freehold.     Fo.    102c 


HAMMERSMITH.— Corner  Site,  depth  243  ft.  Freehold  will  be  sold. 
Fo.    i02y 

SHEPHERD'S  BUSH.— Good  position.  Building  Site,  185  ft.  by  225  tt. 
Freehold  to  be  sold  ;    major   portion  can   remain   on   mortgage.     Fo.    103c 

ACTON. — Site,  50  ft.  by  120  ft.  Freeholtl  £1,600,  or  a  ground  rent  ot 
£80  per  annum.     Fo.   107c 

CROYDON— Site,  close  to  High-street.  Low  ground  rent  on  building 
lease.     Fo.    io7cy 

HARROW-ROAD— Site,  splendid  position,  36  ft.  by  136  ft.  Will  be  let 
on  building  lease  at  £140  per  annum.      Fo.    ioSc 

WESTMINSTER.— Site  in  good  position,  22  ft.  by  53  ft.  Price,  free- 
hold, £850,  or  would  be  let  at  £50  per  annum.     Fo.  io8cy 

FINSBURY,  E.C.— Site,  9,650  square  ft.  Building  lease  99  years. 
Ground  Rent  £300  per  annum.     48  ft.  by  235  ft      Fo.    105c 

WALHAM  GREEN.— FreehoFd  Site,  72  ft.  by  106  ft.  Excellent  position. 
Freehold  for   sale.     Fo.   iQ5Cy 

BETHNAL  GREEN.— Site  in  main  street,  61  ft.  by  96  ft.  Price  £4.500 
freehold.     Ground  Rent  £250.     Will  seat  about  580.     Fo.    112C.V 

ACTON.— Splendid  corner  Site,  really  a  valuable  position,  leading  to  a 
larger  Site  in  the  rear,  100  ft.  deep  with  frontage  of  171  ft.  Rent  of  the 
corner  premises  is  £130  per  annum.  Freehold  of  site  at  rear  £1,500. 
Quite  an  unusual  opportunity.     Fo.    113c 

CHELSEA.— Site  with  two  frontages,  39  ft.  by  66  ft.  Price,  freehold, 
£700.     On  building  lease,  £35  per  annum.     Fo.    122CV 

CLAPTON.— House  and  Stabling,  26  ft.   by  100  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £800. 

Fo.    1 1 3cy 
EALING.— Site,    60    ft.     by    120    ft.     Ground    Rent    £50.     Premium    £150. 

Long  lease.     Fo.  127c 

WESTBOURNE  GROVE.— Premises  easily  adaptable,   70  ft.  frontage  by 

40  ft.   deep,  with  back   entrance.     Rent  £600  per  annum.     Fo.    i24cy 

HARROW-ROAD.— Premises  with  an  area  of  26,433  "•  Price  ,£8,000. 
Ground  Rent  £232,  or  would  be  let  at  £750  per  annum.     Lease  46  years. 

Fo.    I38cy 

LONDON,  N.W. — A  really  good  Site,  situate  in  a  main  road,  having  a 
frontage  of"  120  ft.   and  depth  of  160  ft.     Rent   £600.     Fo.    lsocy , 

LONDON,  N.W.— An  excellent  Site  in  a  busy  spot.  Frontage  171  ft., 
depth   126  ft.     Rent  £750-      Price  £15,000.     Fo.   151c 


LONDON,  SUBURB,  S.W.— A  fine  corner  Site  in  a  good  position.  Area 
3,250  square  feet.  Price,  freehold,  £1,250,  or  would  let  on  a  building  lease 
at  £65  per  annum.     Fo.   i39Cy 


W*    LEACH*    high-class  IRestorations,    2>ccoratin<j 

DRAWINGS   AND   ESTIMATES   SUBMITTED   FREE. 

57,  New  Compton  Street,  Charing  Cross,  W, 


'Phone 
Gerrard  4986. 


&    Sanitary   Morfe, 


Works : 
Star  Court,  Soho  Square,  W. 


May,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


31 


ACTON  —Corner  Site.     Frontage  15=  ft.,  and  a  return  frontage  of  102  ft. 
Admirably  adapted  for  a  Cinematograph   Theatre.     Price,   freehold,   £1,300. 

10.    144c}' 


LONDON,  S.W.— Splendid  Site  in  a  good  main  position.  Everything  is 
ready  for  immediate  possession;  plans  have  been  passed  by  the  L.C.C., 
and  the  necessary  licences  obtained.  Would  accommodate  a  theatre 
capable  of  holding  about  700.  Area  6,000  square  feet.  Ground  rent  £100 
per  annum.  Premium  £500,  open  to  offer.  Lease  21  years,  could  be 
extended.     Fo.   142c . , 

LONDON,  WEST-END.— Site  in  one  of  the  businest  thoroughfares  in 
the  West-End.     Price  £510,   leasehold.      Fo.    u6cy . 

LONDON,  S.W. — An  excellent  corner  Site  in  a  good  position,  60  ft.  by 
56  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000,  or  on  building  lease.     Fo.    147c 

LONDON,    S.W. — Site,    having    an    area    of    13,000    square    feet    for    Sale, 

freehold.     Price  £5,000,   or  would  let  on  building  lease  at   £250  per  annum. 

Fo.    i49cy 

LONDON,  WEST-END.— Handsome  Hall  situate  in  a  very  busy  spot, 
easily  converted.     Low  rent.     Fo.    ijicy 

GOLDER'S  GREEN.— Fine  corner  Site,  having  a  frontage  of  67  ft., 
and  a  return  frontage  of  103  ft.  Splendid  position.  Ground  rent  £100. 
Premium   £1,000.     Fo.    152c 

LONDON,  N.E. — Corner  Site  in  a  fine  position.  Area  30,700  square  feet. 
Excellent  opportunity.   Price,  freehold,  £4,800.     Fo.   ij2cy 

ROTHERHITHE. — (Really  an  unusual  opportunity.)  In  the  best  position. 
Site  80  ft.  x  170  ft.,  in  addition  to  entrance  14ft.  x  60  ft.  Back  entrances  to 
two  streets.  All  plans  passed  for  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Price  for  the  free- 
hold £3,000,  or  would  let  at  a  ground  rent.     Fo.  159c. 

HOME    COUNTIES. 

BEDFORDSHIRE.— A  well-built  property,  heretofore  used  as  a  Kink, 
suitable  for  conversion  to  a  Cinematograph  Theatre  with  small  expense. 
Large  seating  capacity.  Population  50,000.  Rent  £300  per  annum,  or  the 
freehold  will  be   sold  for  £4,500.     Fo.  626b 

BUCKS. — Skating  Rink  in  a  good  position  in  a  large  town,  48  ft.  by 
151    ft.      Price,    freehold,    £1,800.     Fo.  145c. 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,  High  Wycombe.— A  Building  Site  at  present 
comprising  four  cottages  in  the  main  street,  with  a  large  factory  in  the 
rear,  having  a  frontage  to  another  street  ;  tne  whole  of  the  property  is  now 
let  and  producing  about  £125  per  annum.  Has  a  frontage  of  50  ft.  and  a 
depth  of  150  ft.     Rent  £104  per  annum.      Premium  £850.     Fo.  438b 

SURREY. — Cinematograph  Theatre  in  the  High-street,  80  ft.  by  85  ft., 
with  seating  capacity  at  present  of  only  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £200.  Rent 
£110  per  annum.     Lease  5   years,  with  option.     Fo.   153CV 

BERKSHIRE. — Important  town,  a  good  Theatre,  seating  about  700. 
Lease  19  years.  Rent  £300  per  annum.  A  sound  concern  able  to  do  a 
very  large   business.     Price,  including  electric  light  plant,  £1,500.     Fo.    651b 

BERKSHIRE. — Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  350.  Rent  £260  per 
annum.  Lease  14  years,  which  includes  a  large  Hall  at  the  back,  let  at 
£6  per  week.     Price,   inclusive,  £650.     Fo.   752b 

SURREY,  Croydon. — A  gooo.  Site  in  an  excellent  position,  just  a  few 
doors  from  the  best  and  busiest  shopping  part,  48  ft.  by  170  ft.  A  remark- 
ably good  opportunity  to  get  one  of  the  best  positions  in  this  important 
town.  Price,  freehold,  £3,000,  or  £2,000  for  the  .999  years'  lease,  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50  per  annum.     Might  be  let  without  a  premium.    Fo.   765y 

HERTS. —In  a  first-class  town.  Population  50,000.  An  excellent  Site  in 
the  very  best  position,  close  to  the  junction  of  four  main  roads,  43  it. 
wide  by  100  ft.  deep.  A  Theatre  can  be  erected  for  about  £1,500,  and 
there  is  no  doubt  that  a  very  steady  and  satisfactory  business  could  be 
done.     Ground   Rent  £150  (no  premium).     Fo.   566b 

SURREY. — With  a  shopping  population  of  between  40,000  and  45,000. 
Very  excellent  Hall,  seating  about  800,  with  stage  and  every  convenience 
for  running  a  Cinematograph  Theatte  with  Turns  if  desired.  Completely 
fitted  with  seating  and  everytmng  necessary.  The  property  includes  a  resi- 
dence and  a  handsome  building  which  could  be  utilised  as  a  Club,  Dancing 
Academy,  or  any  other  business  where  a  handsome  building  is  required 
with  a  number  of  fine  rooms.  Replete  with  every  convenience,  including 
large  tennis  lawn.    Price  £8,000.    Might  be  let  at  £500  per  annum.     Fo.  664V 

HERTS,  St.  Albans.— Freehold  Land  ahiJ  Buildings  in  the  heart  of  the 
City,  50  ft.  frontage  by  300  ft.  deep,  comprising  two  large  dwelling  houses 
with  shops  and  stores.     Gardens  and  yards  at  rear.     Price   £2,500.     Fo.  766y 

CROYDON.— Corner  Site,  in  ft.  6  in.  by  87  ft.  10  in.  Price,  freehold, 
£i,ooo.     No  theatres  in    the  vicinity.     A  good  spot  for  business.     Fo.   685y 

HERTS. — Large  town.  Theatre  seating  500.  Takings  £50  per  week. 
Net  profit  nearly  £25  per  week.  Price  for  the  whole,  including  the  build- 
ing, £3,000.     Fo.  807b 

HERTS. — Large  town.  Picture  Theatre,  seating  750.  Price  £4,500,  half 
of  which  can  remain.     Rent  £300.     A  going  concern,  making  good  profits. 

Fo.   114CV 


KENT.— A  fine  Building,  having  frontage  of  62  ft.  and  a  depth  of 
168  ft.  At  present  seating  2-0;  could  be  enlarged  to  i.eoo.  The  Building 
includes  a  residential  upper  part,  and  also  stabling,  which  could  easily  be 
let  off.  Price  £3,700,  £2,000  of  which  can  remain  on  mortgage,  or  Theatre 
would  be  let  at  £150  per  annum  and  contents  at  a  valuation.     Fo.    139c 

OXON. — A  going  concern.  Seating  1,000.  No  opposition  whatever.  Low 
inclusive   price.     Fo.    140c 


MIDLANDS. 


DERBYSHIRE.— Skating  Rink,  frontage  48  ft.,  depth  128  ft.,  seating 
capacity   about    1,000.     Established   November,    1909.     Low  price.     Fo.   639b 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. — Large  mining  district.  Iron  and  timber  built 
Theatre,  fitted  tip-up  seats.  Prices  6d.,  9d.,  is  ,  and  is.  6d.  Electric  light, 
own  plant.  Seat  1,000.  Built  about  six  years  ago  but  not  yet  opened  as 
Picture  Theatre.  Unusual  opportunity.  Price  £1,200  as  it  stands,  in- 
cluding everything.  Might  be  'et  for  £350  per  annum.  Freehold  can  be 
acquired.     Fo.   99oy 

WARWICKSHIRE.— A  substantially  built  Theatre,  in  a  prominent  posi- 
tion, having  a  frontage  of  164  ft.  Includes  two  lock-up  shops.  Part  let 
off  at  £100  per  annum.  Fitted  with  every  convenience.  Lease  87  years. 
Ground  Rent  £93  per  annum.  Price  £11,000,  half  of  which  can  remain  on 
mortgage.  The  profits  are  estimated  at  between  £2,500  and  £3,000  pel 
annum.     There  is  no  other  hall  within   two  miles.     Fo.   775y 

NORTHANTS.— Picture  Palace,  90  ft.  by  97  ft.,  seating  750.  Large 
town  with  100,000  population.  Average  takings  £60  to  £100  per  week. 
Price  for  freehold,  including  the  Theatre  as  a  going  concern,  £4,500.  A 
very  good  investment.     Fo.  997y 

DERBY. — Corner  Site,  17,000  square  ft.  Freehold  £2,500.  Three  houses 
on  site  bring  in  £111  per  annum.     Fo.  H7cy 

NOTTINGHAM. — Site  over  9,000  square  ft.  Price  £12,000,  or  ground 
rent  £600  per    annum.     Fo.    125c 

DERBY.  — Corner  Site,  splendid  position,  90  ft.  by  173  ft.  Licences 
already   obtained.     Ground   Rent  £300.     Lease  99  years.     Premium  £3,000. 

Fo.  135c 


NORTH    OF    ENGLAND. 

LANCASHIRE.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  frontage  38  ft.,  depth  68  ft., 
seating  about  450.  Price,  inclusive,  £1,000,  including  generating  plant. 
Opened  January,  191 1.     Fo.  502a 

LANCASHIRE. — The  Market  Hall  in  an  important  town,  seating  about 
1,000.  At  present  taking  nearly  £40  per  week.  An  old-established  going 
concern.  Rent  £525  per  annum.  A  sum  of  £100  will  be  accepted  from  an 
immediate  purcbaser.     Fo.   810b 

LANCASHIRE. —  Site,  splendid  position  in  large  town.  Area  7,200  square 
feet.     Ground  rent  just  over  £900  per  annum.     Lease  28  years.     Fo.   145CV 

SCARBOROUGH.— A  good  Site  for  the  erection  of  a  Theatre  capable  of 
seating  about  600.     Price,   freehold,  £4,600.     Would   be  let.     Fo.   732b 

LANCASHIRE. — Large  town,  Theatre  established  z\  years,  making  a  net 
profit  of  £10  to  £12  per  week.  Lease  900  years,  at  a  Ground  Rent  of  £23 
per   annum.      Price   £3,000,    inclusive.      Fo.    640b 

DURHAM. — A  fine  Theatre  seating  1,500.  Newly  built,  September,  1910. 
The  freehold  would  be  sold  or  would  be  let  at  £520  per  annum  with  a 
premium   of  £1.000.     The  only  place  of  amusement  in  the  town.     Fo.   859b 

LIVERPOOL.— A  large  Hall  seating  300,  in  a  fine  residential  part  of  the 
town,  including  dwelling  house.  Can  be  had  for  £90  per  annum  and  a 
small    premium.     A  fine   opportunity  for  a  beginner.     Fo.    788y 

YORKSHIRE. — Skating  Rink.  Large  town.  Easily  converted  into  a 
really  fine  Cinematograph  Theatre.  Price  £3,000.  Ground  Rent  £200. 
Might  be  let  on  lease  at  £1,200  per  annum.     Fo.    100c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,  8,500  square  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £8,000,  or  building 
lease   at  £320  per  annum.     Fo.   106c 

SHEFFIELD. — Site,  6,000  square  ft.  Excellent  position.  To  let  on 
building   lease.     £400  per  annum.     Fo.   io6cy 

SHEFFIELD. — Fine    Theatre    Site,     area    18,000    square    ft.,     to    let    on 
!     building   lease  at   £1,000  per  annum.     Splendid    position.     Fo.    iij6c 

SUNDERLAND.— Site,  7,600  square  ft.,   in  central  position.     Price,   free- 
I     hold,  £3,500.     Fo.    no6cy 

YORKSHIRE.— Skating    Rink    in    town    with    population    of    over    40,000. 
!     Plans   passed   for    converting   to    a   Theatre.      Rent.    £130.      No   premium. 

Fo.    io4cy 

YORKSHIRE. — Site,  situate  in  the  centre  of  a  large  town.  Frontage 
50  ft.,  and  depth  77  ft.  Rent  £150  per  annum.  Lease  15  years.  Price 
£1,800.      Fo.    147CV 

LI  VERPOOL.—  Site,     nearly    8,000     square    ft.     Price,     freehold,     ^7,500. 
I     Adjoining  property   could  be  purchased  if  further  space  desired.     Fo.   11.9c 


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32 


THE     CINEMA. 


May,  1912. 


LANCASHIRE.— The  best  Theatre  in  a  large  town  could  be  purchased 
for   £16.000.  freehold.     Remarkable    opportunity.     Fo.    ioocy 

LIVERPOOL. — Site,  nearly  10,000  square  ft.  Very  good  position. 
Price  £23,500.     Fo.    110c 

LIVERPOOL.— Site,  8,000  square  ft.,  in  excellent  position.  Price 
£10,000,  freehold.     Fo.    nocy - 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  40,000  square  ft.     Price  £6,750,  freehold.     Fo.  118c 

LEEDS.— Excellent  Site,  12,000  square  ft.  Price  £45,000.  The  adjoining 
property  with   12,000  square   tt.     Price  £15,000.     Fo.   115c 

LEEDS.— Good  Site,  14,000  square  ft.  Close  to  station.  Freehold.  For 
sale  at   a  low  figure.     Fo.    iijcy 

LIVERPOOL.— Site  in  centre  of  city,  two  frontages.  Lease  75  years. 
Price  £7,500,   Ireehold.     8,000  square  ft.     Fo.    123c)' 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  8,000  square  ft.  Price  £1,575.  freehold  90  ft.  by 
90  ft.     Adjoining  corner  building   can  be   obtained.     Fo.   119c 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site,  31,000  square  ft.  Price  £7,000,  including  build- 
ing producing  income.     Fo.  119CV 

BIRKENHEAD.— In  very  fine  position,   18,000  square  ft.     Price  £2,500. 

Fo.  120c 

SHEFFIELD.— Site,    10,000  square  ft.     Price  £5,000,  freehold.     Fo.   121CV 

BOLTON.— Site,  in  splenaia  position,  at  present  occupied  by  seven 
shops.  Price,  freehold,  £9,500,  or  would  let  on  lease  at  £380.  16,000 
square  ft.     Fo.   122c 1 

BRADFORD.— Site,  149,000  square  ft.,  four  frontages.  Low  price  for 
freehold.     Fo.  129c  

HULL.— Site,  94  ft.  by  94  tt.     Magnificent  corner  Site.     Freehold,  £5,000. 

Fo.  I28cy 

HULL.— Site,  6,840  square  ft.  Close  to  railway  station.  At  present 
having  shop,   house,  stabling,    &c.     Price  £1,500,  freehold.     Fo.   134c 

HULL.— Site,  48  ft.  by  63  ft.     Freehold,  £1,500.     Fo.  128c 


HULL.— 4,000  square   ft.     Freehold,    £2,500.     Fo.   127CV 

BIRKENHEAD.— Site  in  a  fine  position,  12,000  square  ft.,  frontage  72  ft. 
Price  £6,400,  or  would  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.  132CV 


BIRKENHEAD.— A  very  good  Site,  165  ft.  by  172  ft.,  with  house  built 
on  portion  of  the  property,  from  which  a  rental  of  nearly  £300  is  being 
derived.     Price  £7,000.  freehold.     Fo.  133c __ 

BIRKENHEAD.— In  central  situation.  Area  23,000  square  ft.  Price 
£10,000.     Fo.   i33Cy . 

CHESHIRE.— Theatre  in  large  town.  Seating  300,  with  standing  room 
for  50.  Interior  tastefully  decorated  and  nicely  fitted.  To  be  let  for 
£62  per  annum.  Price  £300,  which  includes  electric  light  plant,  machine, 
&c,    or  would    take   a   partner.      Fo.    137c 


SOUTH    OF    ENGLAND. 

KENT. — Site  in  a  very  well-known  seaside  town.  A  small  theatre  has 
been  erected  on  the  site,  but  it  is  too  small.  Plans  are  prepared  and 
passed  by  the  Council  for  a  new  theatre  to  seat  600;  with  the  present  outfit 
it  would  cost  about  £2,000  to  rebuild  and  equip.  Trams  pass  the  door. 
Ground  rent  £50,  rising  to  £60.  Lease  20  years,  with  option  to  purchase. 
Fine    opportunity.      Fo.    141CV 

KENT.— The  newly  built  property,  35  ft.  by  100  ft.  Now  used  as  a 
Skating  Rink,  will  cost  an  extremely  small  sum  to  convert  to  a  Cinemato- 
graph Theatre.  Rent  £200.  Lease  7,  14.  21  years.  No  premium.  If  de- 
sired, the  Skating  Rink  can  still  be  carried  on,  leaving  a  Hall  79  ft.  by 
35  ft.,  which   could  be  used  for  Cinematograph  purposes.     Fo.   508a 

KENT.— Large  seaside  resort.  An  important  property  having  a  frontage 
of  650  ft.  to  the  sea  with  a  private  Promenade.  Capable  of  accommodating, 
in  addition  to  the  Cinematograph  Theatre,  various  other  properties  for 
amusements,  together  with  shops,  &c.  Although  a  sum  of  £40,000  has  been 
expended  on  the  property,   the  freehold  will  be  sold  for  £16,000.     Fo.    722b 

HAMPSHIRE.— A  nice  little  Hall,  fitted  with  electric  light  plant,  doing 
a  large  business  with  the  Military,  being  close  to  the  Camps.  Price  £250, 
inclusive.     Rent  £64  per  annum.     Fo.    523" 

KENT.  — Cinematograph  Theatre  having  a  seating  capacity  of  550,  in  a 
large  seaside  resort,  requiring  £250  for  furnishing.  Rent  £200  per  annum. 
Price  £250.     Fully  licensed,  ready  for   opening  except  furnishing.     Fo.    442V 

WORTHING.— A  freehold  Site  situated  in  a  most  prominent  position, 
and  having  entrances  in  three  thoroughfares,  at  present  consisting  of  four 
shops  and  two  private  houses.     Easily   convertible.     Would  be   let   or  sold. 

Fo.    744" 

SOUTH  COAST. — Large  town  and  well  patronised  pleasure  resort.  Cine- 
matograph Theatre  now  in  course  of  erection.  Corner  premises  with  hand- 
some  entrance.  Seating  capacity  500.  Price,  freehold,  £6,500  (open  to 
offer).     Fo.    667V . 

SOUTHAMPTON.— Site  ui  best  part  of  the  town,  40  ft.  by  100  ft. 
Freehold.  £1.000.      Fo.    11 


PORTSMOUTH.— Site,  good  position,  51  ft.  by  160  ft. 


Freehold,   £1,00 
Fo.    12'iry 

PORTSMOUTH.— Site,  67  ft.  by  100  ft.     Low  price  for  freehold.     Fo.   130c 
SOUTHAMPTON. — Site,    admirably    situated    for    a   Theatre.     Lease    82 
years      Ground  Rent   £50.     Price  £6,000.     Frontage  100  ft.,  depth  80  ft. 

Fo.      I^2C 


SOUTHAMPTON.— Very   large  Hall,    easily  adaptable. 
Freehold,    £7.000.       Fo.    mc 


ft.    by    140  tt. 


CHANNEL  ISLANDS.— Large  town.  Theatre,  with  seating  capacity  of 
300,  to  "be  sold  as  a  going  concern  for  £150.     Fo.  n6cy i 

SUSSEX.— Skating  Rink  in  a  select  seaside  resort.  Was  erected  at  a 
cost  of  £5,000.  Easilv  converted  if  necessary.  Rent  £250  per  annum.  Price 
for  the  building,  &c,"  £1,500.     Lease  7  years.     A  bargain.     Fo.   141c 


EAST    OF    ENGLAND. 


Sl'FFULK.— Large  fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  Frontage  184  ft.,  depth 
75  ft.  Licensed  to  seat  2,000.  Built  two  years  ago  and  heretofore  used  as 
a  Skating  Rink.  Price,  freehold,  £3,000.  Might  be  let.  A  really  well- 
built  propertv  and  easily  convertible.     Fo.   711b 

NORFOLK. — Fine  Site,  situate  in  the  midst  of  the  working  classes  and 
in  the  principal  street  of  the  town.  Area  16,700  square  feet.  Nearest 
theatre   ii  mile  away.     Splendid   opportunity.      Fo.    I48cy 


NORFOLK. — Fishing  and  pleasure  resort.  A  Cinematograph  Theatre, 
&c,  making  net  profit  of  about  £600  per  annum.  Price,  incjusive,  £t,ooo. 
Long  lease.     Rent  £175   per  annum.     Fo.   641b 

EAST  COAST. — W7ell-known  seaside  town.  Large  building,  splendidly 
adapted  for  a  Cinematograph  Iheatre.  No  amusements  whatever  at  pre- 
sent.    Price  £1,100.     Part  can   remain  on   mortgage  if    required.     Fo.  56-b 


SUFFOLK.— Large  town.  Skating  Rink,  easily  adaptable.  Price,  free- 
hold, £3,500.     Might  be  let.     Fo.    114c 

WEST  OF    ENGLAND    &    WALES. 

CHESHIRE. — Important  seaside  town  with  very  large  population. 
Splendid  Site  in  a  good  position,  31  ft.  by  100  ft.  Price  £800.  Freehold 
portion   can  remain.     Fo.  619a 

GLAMORGAN.— Cinematograph  Theatre,  seating  about  750  with  a 
balcony.     Rent  £250.     Price,    inclusive  of   everything,    £400.     Fo.    732y 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE. — A  very  good  Theatre  in  a  fine  position,  60  ft. 
by  112  ft.,  seating  900.  Rental  £650.  Lease  14  yens.  Price,  including 
everything,   £800.     Fo.   634b 

GLAMORGAN. — Moderate  sized  Hall,  seating  about  350.  Making  a 
net  profit  of  about  £200  per  annum.  Rent  £225  per  annum  would  be  ac- 
cepted without  a  premium.  On  the  property  is  an  electric  light  generating 
plant.      Fo.    840b 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Large  manufacturing  town.  A  property  situate 
in  the  best  position,  comprising  two  good  Shops  and  Hall  at  rear  with 
entrance  between  the  shops.  Can  be  extended  to  seat  750  to  800.  Lease  21 
years.  Rent  £200,  rising  to  £450  per  annum.  Price  for  the  freehold, 
£4,000.     Fo.  S86b 

RHONDDA  VALLEY.— Large  town.  Substantially  built  Skating  Rink, 
175  ft.  by  65  ft.,  could  be  readily  adapted  into  a  Picture  Palace.  Within 
half   a  minute   of  the  main    tram  route.     Will   be   let  or   sold.     Fo.   672b 

DEVONSHIRE. — Very  large  town.  Picture  Theatre,  seating  425.  Profit- 
able  business.     Price  £3,000,    half   of   which  can   remain   on  mortgage. 

Fo.  799V 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Very  large  town.  Splendid  Skating  Rink. 
Area  about  14,000  square  ft.,  two  frontages,  easily  adaptable  for  Cine- 
matograph Theatre.  Rent  £800  per  annum.  Splendid  opportunity.  Centre 
of    the    town,   trams    passing   door.      Fo.    nicy 

SWINDON. — Site  in  splendid  position,  with  two  frontages,  nearly  :0,00a 
square  ft.     Price,  freehold,  £2,000,   or  would  be    let  on  building  lease. 

Fo.    112c 

CHESHIRE.— Large  shipbuilding  town.  Music  Hall  for  sale.  Freehold 
at  a   low  figure.     Fo.   n8cy 

CARDIFF. — Site  in  one  of  the  best  positions  in  the  city.  Freehold  for 
sale,  or  will  be  let  on  building  lease.     Fo.   125CV 

BRISTOL.— Comer  Site,  95  ft.  by  99  ft.  Price,  freehold,  £2,500,  or  on 
long  lease  at  £100  per  annum.     Fo.  124c 

CARDIFF.— Exceptional  Premises,  with  three  frontages,  4,000  square  ft. 
Ground   Rent  £300,   on   long  lease.     Fo.    ia6cy 

CARDIFF.— Centre  of  city,  67  ft.  by  127  ft.  Price  £2,500,  or  to  let  at  a 
ground  rent  of  £50.     Premium  £1,500.     Fo.   126c 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Seating  about  300.  Rent  £52  per  annum.  Price 
£250  for  everything  as  it  stands.     Fo.    148c 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE:— Theatre  now  building;  two  frontages.  To  be 
completed    September   next.      Seating    1,500.     Rent    about   £400  per   annum. 

Fo,    146c 


SCOTLAND. 


GLASGOW.— Handsome  Theatre.  80  ft.  by  130  ft.  Seating  1,700,  taking 
nearly  £50  per  week.  Price  inclusive  for  this  valuable  going  concern, 
£1,000.      Fo.    429b 

GLASGOW.— Cinematograph  Theatre.  Frontage  45  ft.,  depth  90  ft.  At 
present  seating  only  550.  Taking  about  £25  per  week,  under  management. 
Expenses  about  £18  rjer  week.  Price  £850  for  everything,  which  includes 
the  residence  on    the  property.     Fo.   533b 

EDINBURGH.— Hall  with  seating  capacity  of  350,  fitted  complete. 
Books  can  be  inspected.  No  opposition  in  the  district.  Rent  £100  per 
annum.     Price  £230,  to  include  everything.     Fo.  787b 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


,-EOLIAN  GRAND  ORGAN,  played  by  hand  or  with  music  rolls.  In 
perlectlv  new  condition.  Handsome  oak  case  Beautifully  tuned  instrument. 
Cost  280  gns.  Price  75  gns  Seen  and  tried  by  appointment. — Mr.  H.,  1,  Gre- 
ville  Place,  Maida  Vale. 


Printed   by  Sr.  Clements  Press,  Limited.  Portugal  Street,    Kingsway,  W.C.,  and  published    by  the  Proprietors,  the  Cinema   News  &  Property 

Gazette,  Ltd.,   2t,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford  Street,  W. 


June,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


-YOU    SAVE     MONEY- 


ON     PICTURE     THEATRE     EQUIPMENT 

and   Reduction  in   Electricity  Accounts 

BY   CONSULTING 

Mr.  JAMES  W.  BARBER,  A.M.I.E.E., 

Independent  Consulting  Electrical  and  Cinematograph  Engineer 

(Author  of  "The  Bioscope  Electrician's  Handbook, 
"  Alternating  Currents,"  etc.,  etc.). 

Schemes  prepared  and  advice  given  on  all   Picture  Theatre  Equipment. 

Inspections  and   Insurance  of  Electrical   Plant  against  Breakdown,  etc. 

Address-6,  KINU  EDWARD   MANSIONS, 

212a,  SHAFTESBURY  AVENUE,  LONDON,  W. 

Every  operator  should  possess  a  copy  of  "  The  Bioscope  Elec- 
trician's Handbook." — "The  Operator's  Vade  Mecum"  (vide  Press), 
1/-  post  free  from  the  above.  Also  "Alternating  Currents— Their 
Nature  and  Their  Uses."  —A  Practical  Manual  for  the  Bioscope 
Operator.  6Jd.  post  free.  Tel.  City  6928. 


FILMS  CLEANED  &  REPAIRED 

BY  CHEMICAL   PROCESS. 

3s.    per    1,000    feet    inclusive. 

We  are  Cleaning  for  the  Trade  all  over  the  World. 

ALL    DONE  BY   HAND.         NO  MACHINERY   USED 
PARTS  OF  PROJECTORS  SUPPLIED. 

And  Repairs  of  Every  Description  promptly  done  by  Experienced  Workmen. 


TRY    OUR    NEW    EXPRESS    SERVICE. 

Films  sent  for  at  9  a.m.  returned  Cleaned 
and  Repaired  by  6  o'clock  in  the  Evening. 


F.  HATE,  6,  Ingestre  Place,  Golden  Square,  London,  W. 


The  "Allefex"  is  a  sound-effects  machine  for  accompanying 
moving  pictures.  More  than  30  different  effects,  which  can  all  be 
worked  by  one  man.  All  the  effects  of  land,  sea  and  sky, 
including  battles,  trains,  motor  cars,  horses,  lightning,  etc.,  etc! 
Call  and  hear  it,  or  write  for  illustrated  list. 


0 


0 


PICTURE  PLAYS 

—     AND     — 

HOW   TO   WRITE   THEM. 

This  book  is  a  complete  course  of  instruction 

in  plot-writing,   and  shows    how    to 

turn  ideas  into  money. 


Price  5/=,  post  free. 

Popular  Edition   (unabridged),  2/9,  post  iree, 


Write  for  Complete  List  of  Cinematograph  Books, 

THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    PRESS, 

16,  Cecil  Court,  Charing  Cross  Road,  London,  W.C. 


0 


0 


Telephone  No. 
9804  Gerrard. 


Telegraphic  Address  : 
"Grampires,  London." 


LONDON  BIOSCOPE  SCHOOL 

9,    ST.    MARTIN'S    COURT, 
CHARING    CROSS   ROAD,  W.C. 


All  those  wanting  Experienced 
OPERATORS   81  ASSISTANTS 

apply  as  above. 


Telephone  9768  Gerrard. 


Andrews'  Film  Hire  Service  is  thoroughly  Up-to-date.  The  whole 
of  the  films  released  weekly  in  England  are  reviewed  by  our  own 
buyer  who  devotes  his  whole  time  to  the  work.  Programs  to 
suit  all  classes  of  Picture  Theatres  at  the  lowest  possible  prices. 
May  we  submit  particulars  and  specimen  programs? 


ANDREWS'  PICTURES,  L 


TD     CINE   HOUSE,   GREEK   STREET, 
—    LONDON,    W. 


THE    MOST   PERFECT 
BIOSCOPE   EXTANT. 

j*      <£      NEW      MODEL,.      J*      J* 
ABSOLUTELY     FIREPROOF. 

Pictures    registered    while    the   machine   is   running    or    stationary. 
Optical  Centre  remaining  constant. 

Light  increased  50  per  cent.  No  Supplementary  rollers  to  break  films. 
Mechanism  unequalled  in  workmanship  or  results. 

Catalogues    Post   Free. 


'  Grants : 
' Biojecter ,  London.' 

'  Phone : 
Hop  1904. 


=  R.  R.  = 

BEARD, 

Manufacturers  of 
Scientific  nstruments 
Optical  Lanterns,  Cine- 
ma to  graphs,  Jets, 
Regulators,  Carriers, 
etc. 

lO.TrafalgarRd., 

Old   Kent    Bad, 

LONDON,   S.E. 


THE     CINEMA. 


June,   1912. 


® 

The  Pioneer  Film 

Agency Limited, 

J.S.Selway&Co. 

BUILDERS  &    CONTRACTORS. 

Bioscope 
Outfitters 

and 

Film 
Hirers. 

Personal 
and 
Prompt 
Attention. 

RELIABLE 
QUALITY. 

27,    Cecil    Court,    Charing 
Cross  Road,  LONDON,  W.C. 

Telephones —                        Tel.   Address: 
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-    OUR   FEATURE  IS    - 

15/-  per  1,000  feet, 

or  write  for  our  Suggested 
-    -    Programmes  of    -     - 

5,500  feet,  with  change, 

£3  10  0. 

All  Feature  Films  Lowest  Price. 

WRITE    AT    ONCE. 

We  are  prepared  to  estimate  free 
of    all    charge    for    the  erection  of 

HIGH- CLASS 

Cinema  Theatres 

We    undertake   all    descriptions  of 
decorations. 

On  receipt  of  letter  our  representa- 

tive  will  wait  upon  clients  to  take 

details  of   requirements. 

517,HighRd.,Chiswick,W. 

Periodical  Sales  by  Auction 

:  :  :     OF  : .  :  : 

Theatres,  Halls  and  Sites. 

Reports  and  Valua- 
tions for  all  purposes. 

HELD  AT  THE  MART, 
TOKENHOUSE    YARD. 
E.C.,     OR     IN     THE 
PROVINCES  BY  *   # 
ARRANGEMENT,      AT 
LOW  INCLUSIVE  FEES. 

Advisory     Reports 
given. 

Negotiations     Con- 
ducted for  Purchasers 

For  Terms  and    Particulars    apply 

Messrs.  Harris  &  Gillow, 

Cinematograph     Property       Experts. 

451a,  Oxford  Street,  London,  W. 

"EXCLUSIVE"  FILMS .  . 

ARE 

"FEATURE"  FILMS  .  . 

RENTED    TO 

ONE  HALL  PER  TOWN. 


i 


To  "Star"  an  Exclusive  Feature  Film 
is  the  ideal  method  of  attracting  the 
public  to  picture  theatres  —  to  your 
picture  theatre — and  the  better  the  film 
and  the  more  it  complies  with  the 
demand  of  the  people  for  sensational 
subjects,  the  greater  will  be  its  success. 
We  are  handling  a  number  of  these 
"  Winning  Exclusives,"  and  will  be  glad 
of  the  opportunity  to  send  full  particulars. 
Please  remember  that  all  our  films  are 
rented  on  the  "One  Hall  per  Town" 
principle  and  therefore  cannot  be 
duplicated  by  your  competitors. 


M0N0P0L  FILM  CO.  of  GREAT  BRITAIN 

CINE  HOUSE,  GREEK  STREET,  LONDON,  W. 


General  Manager : 
FREDERICK  MARTIN. 


Wires : 
"SISTERHOOD,  LONDON. 


THE  CINEMA  NEWS  AND  PROPERTY  GAZETTE,  JUNE,  IQI2. 


T£».£PHONtKS« 

seasi  7230  cerrhro. 


IMPERIAL 

SYNDICATE,  LIMITED. 

I    KINEMATOGRAPH    FILM    SERVICES    t 

166  &  168,  SHAFTESBURY  AVENUE. 


RUFFELLS 


TELEGRAMS. 
'  RUFFOSOOPE,  LONDON.' 


No.  5.     Vol.  I. 


JUNE,    1912. 


Registered. 


Price  One  Penny. 
By  Post,  2d. 


EDITORIAL    AND    BUSINESS    NOTICES. 

THE  CINEMA  News  and  Property  Gazette  is  published  on  the  first  of  each 
month.  Copies  can  be  obtained  through  any  Newsagent  or  Railway  Bookstall 
in  Town  or  Country,  or  will  be  sent  direct  from  the  Office  for  2S.  per  annum, 
post  free. 

News  items  of  interest  to  those  engaged  in  the  Cinematograph  Industry  will 
■be  welcomed,  and  communications  should  reach  the  Office  not  later  than  the 
26th  of  the  month,  if  intended  for  publication  in  the  following  month's  issue. 

Articles,  photographs,  or  drawings  intended  for  publication  must  be  accom- 
panied by  a  stamped,  addressed  envelope,  in  case  of  return,  but  the  Editor  will 
not  be  responsible  for  the  safe  return  of  rejected  MS.,  photographs,  or  drawings, 
though  every  care  will  be  taken  of  them. 

Editorial  communications,  which  should  always  be  accompanied  by  the  name 
and  address  of  the  sender,  should  be  addressed  to  the  Editor. 


All  enquiries   respecting    Advertisements  and   business  matters    should    be 
addressed  to  the  Manager,  at  the  Offices  of  The  Cinema, 

21,  North  Audley  Street,  Oxford  Street,  W. 

Wires  :  "Faddist,  London."  'Phones:  Gerrard  7676  &  8798. 


A  Censor  of  Cinema  Posters. 

At  CORRESPONDENT  informs  me  that  the 
Chief  Constable  of  Oldham  has  intimated  to 
the  proprietors  of  all  the  picture  theatres  in 
the  town  that  in  future  they  must  submit  all 
pictorial  posters  to  him  for  inspection  before 
posting  them  on  the  hoardings.  This  is  on  all  fours 
with  the  action  of  the  authorities  in  other  northern  towns 
a  year  or  two  ago,  in  placing  a  censorship  upon  theatrical 
posters,  as  they  were  supposed  to  have  frightened  a 
number  of  old  women  and  children.  What  are  the 
grounds  for  the  present  action  ?     It  would  be  interesting 

to  know.     Is  it But  there,  speculation  is  useless  in 

some  circumstances  ! 


Gaumont  Films  Parlants. 

The  "  Films  Parlants  Gaumont,"  shown  during  last 
month  at  a  special  matinee  at  the  London  Pavilion 
to  all  the  leading  representatives  of  the  cine- 
matograph   industry,   are   likely    to  enjoy     increasingly 

Raise  your  Summer  receipts  by  showing  the  great  Asta 
Nielsen  Exclusive  Picture  Play  Dramas  (Walturdaw). 


wide  popularity.  The  new  invention,  which  represents 
the  combined  efforts  "of  M.  Leon  Gaumont  and  his 
collaborators,  makes  it  possible  for  cinematograph  films 
and  gramophone  records  to  be  taken  simultaneously. 
The  apparatus  which  renders  this  possible  is  of  simple 
construction  and  consists  of  two  electric  motors  of 
identical  pattern  for  driving  the  gramophone  and  the 
cinematograph,  and  by  a  special  device  any  want  of 
accord  between  the  two  can  at  once  be  rectified.  The 
invention  is  the  outcome  of  years  of  experiment,  and,  as 
we  saw  at  the  matinee,  where  special  films  were  shown, 
its  possibilities  are  enormous.  Political  speakers  in  the 
future  will  be  able  to  make  their  orations  with  all  the 
eloquence  of  gesture  and  speech  to  distant  audiences 
without  leaving  their  own  drawing-rooms.  The  evolutions 
of  a  fleet  and  the  thunder  of  the  guns  will  be  shown  and 
heard  far  from  the  sea,  and  the  hitherto  silent  repro- 
ductions of  stage  scenes  will  become  a  thousand  times 
more  fascinating. 

<+* 

Edison's  Latest  Wonder. 

Apropos  of  M.  Gaumont's  invention  it  is  interesting 
to  learn,  through  the  Daily  News,  that  Edison,  the 
greatest  of  living  inventors,  has  also  been  working  on  the 
same  lines,  and  that  he,  too,  has  perfected  his  device  for 
synchronising  the  cinematograph  and  the  gramophone. 
"If  Gaumont  has  solved  the  problem  I  congratulate 
him,"  says  the  great  American.  "  That  has  been  my 
chief  difficulty,  but  it  is  conquered.  My  apparatus  is 
perfect,  and  all  we  have  got  to  do  is  to  get  more  scenarios 
written,  have  our  actors  rehearsed,  and  turn  out  the 
films.  I'm  even  more  interested,"  proceeded  Mr.  Edison, 
"  in  the  application  of  talking  pictures  to  grand  opera. 
For  five  cents  and  ten  cents  you  are  going  to  see  the 
world's  greatest  operas  sung  and  acted  by  the  world's 
greatest   artistes,    and     on    both    sides   of    the   Atlantic 

Like  another  "Good  Thing,"  Fools  of  Society,  The  Great 
Moment,  Gipsy  Blood,  etc.,  are  still  going  strong  (Walturdaw). 


THE     CINEMA. 


Jink,    191 2. 


simultaneously.  There  is  no  scenery  save  what  is  pro- 
jected on  the  screen,  and  the  voices  of  the  singers 
accompanying  the  action  of  the  pictures  are  precisely  as 
if  the  opera  itself  was  being  performed.  And  all  for  a 
nickel  or  a  dime  !  At  last  the  pleasures  of  the  poor  will 
be  considered." 

"The  Miracle." 

An  immense  amount  of  interest  has  been  aroused  by 
the  announcement  that  the  original  cinematograph 
pictures  of  Professor  Max  Reinhardt's  wonderful  word- 
Jess  mystery  play,  "  The  Miracle,"  will  shortly  be  ready 
for  exhibition.  As  a  matter  of  fact  the  pictures  have 
not  yet  been  taken,  but  arrangements  are  already  com- 
plete for  making  this  record  in  Vienna  of  one  of  the 
greatest  spectacles  ever  seen.  The  whole  of  the  film 
will,  I  understand,  be  coloured,  and  voice  effects  will  be 
introduced,  whilst  the  original  music  by  Engelbert 
Humperdinck  will  form  a  special  feature  of  the  pro- 
duction. No  less  a  sum  than  ten  thousand  pounds  has 
been  paid  for  the  American  picture  rights  alone,  and  this 
only  represents  a  payment  on  account  of  the  percentage 
of  the  expected  receipts. 

Daylight  Shows. 

This  summer  we  are  likely  to  see  a  big  advance  in  the 
popularity  of  the  cinema  show  as  a  popular  warm-wyeather 
entertainment.  The  first  move  in  this  direction  will  be 
the  erection  of  a  daylight  cinematograph  show  at  the 
White  City,  Shepherd's  Bush.  Visitors  to  the  exhibition 
are  now  able  to  enjoy  a  full  cinematograph  entertainment 
in  broad  daylight  and  in  the  open  air.  So  popular  is  this 
form  of  entertainment  likely  to  become  that  I  understand 
similar  daylight  cinemas  are  to  be  erected  at  Folkestone, 
Dover,  Southsea,  Shanklin  and  elsewhere.  The  idea 
seems  likely  to  catch  on,  and  all  that  is  necessary  to 
ensure  success  is  a  good  "  pitch."  Given  this,  the 
new  form  of  cinematograph  entertainment  is  lively  to 
prove  a  formidable  rival  to  the  existing  pierrot  show 
which  is  so  familiar  a  feature  of  seaside  life. 

<«^ 
A  Charming  Cinema. 

Our  contention  that  the  cinema  of  the  future  will 
increase  in  size  almost  out  of  recognition  is  already 
proving  correct.  The  Majestic  Picturedrome  in  Totten- 
ham Court  Road  which  has  just  been  opened  is  a  case 
in  point.  Here  is  a  theatre  capable  of  seating  nearly 
one  thousand  people,  opening  in  a  thoroughfare  where 
there  are  already  four  other  well-patronised  houses.  To 
the  uninitiated  there  may  hardly  have  appeared  room  at 
first  sight  for  another  competitor,  and  yet  the  manage- 
ment of  the  Majestic  have  already  demonstrated  that 
despite  the  nearness  of  the  other  theatres,  there  is  ample 
scope  for  yet  one  more  well-managed  and  properly 
equipped  cinematograph  house.  All  are  doing  well 
because  they  are  under  proper  control,  because  they  are 
giving  the  public  what  they  want,  and  because  in  this 
particular  neighbourhood  there  is  a  sufficiently  large 
population  "  to  go  round." 

<•- 
Some   Novel   Features. 

The  new  theatre  has  been  constructed  on  ideal  lines, 
and  the  system  of  graduated  lighting  from  the  entrance 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s- 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


to  the  auditorium  is  one  which  is  worthy  of  general 
adoption.  The  vestibule  (which  is  30  feet  deep),  and 
the  corridor  (45  feet  long),  are  panelled  in  light  oak,  and 
the  body  of  the  theatre  is  similarly  treated.  The  seats 
are  arranged  in  semi-circular  style,  there  is  an  excellent 
system  of  ventilation,  and  portraits  of  moving  picture 
celebrities  adorn  the  walls.  The  appearance  of  the  staff 
in  the  uniforms  of  Naval  officers  is  distinctly  novel. 

<«- 
Sunday  Picture  Shows. 

A  report  by  the  Theatres  Committee  of  the  London 
County  Council  shows  that  in  the  nine  months  ending 
March  31  the  total  receipts  at  Sunday  cinematograph 
entertainments  amounted  to  ^"92,177.  Of  this  ^44,043. 
was  received  by  the  licensees  of  the  premises  as  rent  and 
expenses,  ^"19,363  was  paid  as  wages,  and  ,£"15,247  was 
realised  as  profit  for  charity.  The  committee  state  that 
they  had  taken  action  in  cases  where  the  balance-sheets 
showed  that  all  or  nearly  all  the  receipts  had  gone  to  the- 
licensees  as  rent. 

A   Useful    Manual. 

Many  exhibitors  experience  a  difficulty  in  preparing 
the  matter  to  advertise  their  show.  This  is  more  par- 
ticularly the  case  where  they  have  booked  a  big  exclusive. 
Anything,  therefore,  which  renders  the  task  more  easy  is 
to  be  welcomed.  The  new  Century  Film  Service,. 
Limited,  with  that  perspicuity  which  is  the  secret  of  their 
success,  long  ago  recognised  this  fact,  and  as  in  the  case 
of  "  Christopher  Columbus,"  are  issuing  a  most  useful 
and  informative  manual  in  connection  with  the  release  of 
the  great  English  three  reel  film  "  Saved  by  Fire,"  which 
we  reviewed  at  length  last  month.  This  booklet  contains 
most  valuable  suggestions  as  to  the  publicity  necessary  in 
the  local  press,  and  a  carefully  selected  musical  pro- 
gramme. Every  exhibitor  showing  this  magnificent 
him  should  take  care  that  he  gets  a  copy  of  this  capital 
booklet — but  no  doubt  the  New  Century  Film  Service,. 
Limited  (with  Mr.  H.  Dickson  at  its  head),  will  see  to 

that. 

<+- 

Congratulations. 

Presence  of  mind  in  great  emergency  is  given  to  few, 
and  one  feels  that  a  word  of  warm  congratulations  is  due 
to  Mr.  Fred  Boustead,  the  manager  of  the  Queen's 
Theatre,  Rosebery  Avenue,  W.,  on  the  level-headedness 
he  displayed  on  the  occasion  of  a  recent  fire  in  the 
operator's  box  at  that  house.  At  the  time  the  place  was 
full  of  children,  and  a  panic  of  a  most  disastrous  kind 
might  easily  have  arisen.  Mr.  Boustead,  however,  sized 
up  the  situation,  had  all  the  exits  thrown  open,  and 
standing  in  their  midst,  directed  the  egress  of  the  children 
into  the  street,  whilst  the  pianiste  very  appropriately 
played  a  popular  air  on  the  piano.  Although  there  was 
no  real  danger,  the  incident  might  have  developed  into  £ 
very  grim  tragedy  but  for  the  prompt  action  of  the 
manager.  As  it  was,  however,  it  only  served  to  show 
how  safe  the  average  cinematograph  theatre  in  this 
country  is,  thanks  to  the  care  exercised  in  the  control. 
The  fire  this  week  at  Villa  Real,  in  Spain,  when  80  per- 
sons were  burned  to  death  in  a  cinema  theatre,  owing 
chiefly  to  lack  of  exits,  serves  to  show  how  differently 
they  do  things  abroad. 

A  mine  of  information  in  a  Walturdaw  Catalogue.  Send  for 
it,  post  free  9d. 


June,   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


Film  Store  Licensing. 

During  the  past  month  the  Committee  of  the  House 
of  Commons  which  has  under  discussion  the  provisions 
of  the  London  County  Council  General  Powers  Bill 
c  onsidered  the  clauses  dealing  with  the  licensing  of 
cinematograph  film  stores.  For  the  County  Council  it 
was  contended  that  in  the  case  of  film  stores  the  very 
least  that  should  be  done  would  be  to  separate,  by  means 
of  fireproof  doors,  the  portion  of  the  building  used  as 
such  from  residential  portions  of  the  building,  so  that  if 
a  fire  broke  out  it  would  not  spread  to  other  portions  of 
the  structure.  It  was  proposed  that  all  stores  should  be 
licensed — an  annual  licence,  renewable  every  year — and, 
to  prevent  any  feeling  of  insecurity  or  injustice,  an 
appeal  to  the  Secretary  of  State  is  to  be  provided  for, 
either  with  regard  to  the  withholding  of  the  licence 
or  any  conditions  imposed. 
1  Jii  <*• 

A  Money  Maker. 

Showmen  on  the  look  out  for  a 
novelty,  which  also  has  every 
indication  of  being  a  money 
maker,  should  make  a  point  of 
writing  Film  Stories,  16,  Cecil 
-Court,  W.C.,  for  details  of  an 
ingenious  magazine  programme 
which  it  is  proposed  to  issue  in 
the  near  future,  by  means  of 
which  every  theatre  caring  to  do 
so  can  have  its  own  magazine. 
The  idea  in  a  word  is  to  print 
the  stories  of  all  the  films  show- 
ing at  each  theatre  in  the  form 
of  a  carefully  written  and  illus- 
trated journal.  The  front  of  the 
cover  will  contain  a  photo  repro- 
duction of  the  theatre,  and  the 
remaining  three  pages  of  the 
cover  will  be  available  for  local 
advertisements,  which  should 
yield  a  good  revenue. 


ANOTHER  THEATRE 

SOLD  THROUGH 
"THE    CINEMA." 


We  have  been  favoured  with 
an  advance  copy  of  the  publica- 
tion, which  is  excellent  and  most 

attractive  in  get  up,  and  we  understand  that  copies,  with 
the  special  programme  and  local  advertisements  printed 
in,  will  be  supplied  at  a  figure  which  shows  the  exhibitor 
an  excellent  return  for  the  trouble  expended.  Already, 
we  are  informed,  inquiries  regarding  the  scheme  repre- 
senting nearly  250  cinema  theatres  have  been  received. 

Sunday  Opening  in  America. 

The  question  of  Sunday  opening  is  at  present  being 
widely  discussed  in  America,  and  in  view  of  the  intima- 
tion conveyed  by  the  London  County  Council  at  its  last 
meeting,  that  the  whole  situation  may  shortly  be 
reconsidered  by  that  body,  it  is  interesting  to  know  how 
the  matter  is  viewed  on  the  other  side.  In  the  first 
place,  public  opinion  is  entirely  in  favour  of  Sunday 
shows,  but  there  is  a  distinct  tendency  towards  the 
advocacy  of  making  the  Sunday  programme  more  in 
keeping  with  the  day.     It  is  suggested  that  a  Bill  for  the 

Raise  your  Summer  receipts  by  showing  the  great  Asta 
Nielsen  Exclusive  Picture  Play  Dramas  (Walturdaw). 


30,  Hillside  Gardens, 
Highgate,   N., 

May  /6th,  1912. 

Dear  Sir, — I  am  extremely  pleased  to 
be  able  to  say  that  the  article  on  the 
Penge  Picturedrome,  which  appeared 
in  the  April  issue  of  "The  Cinema," 
resulted  in  a  very  satisfactory  sale. 

I  received  quite  a  number  of  appli- 
cations as  a  result  of  the  article,  and 
I  think  this  speaks  well  for  the  influential 
circulation  of  your  paper. 

Yours  faithfully, 

D.  A.  THOMSON. 


legalising  of  motion  picture  exhibitions  on  Sunday 
ought  to  provide  for  three  distinct  conditions  : — (1)  The 
religious  or  educational  character  or  tendency  of  the 
picture;  (2)  The  explanatory  lecture,  which  is  allowed 
on  Sunday  everywhere  under  the  present  law,  and 
which  gives  the  Sunday  exhibition  a  dignity  of  its  own  ; 
and  (3)  The  limitation  of  time,  setting  a  certain  hour  on 
Sunday  for  the  beginning  of  motion  picture  exhibitions. 

<•- 

The  position  is  admirably  summed  up  by  the  Moving 

Picture   World,     the    leading    paper     in    the    American 

industry,  which  points  out  that  the   limitation   in  point 

of  time  is  designed  to   disarm  criticism   from  those  who 

hold  strict  views  in  regard  to  the  sacred  character  of  the 

day.     "  It  would  be  well,"  says  our  exchange,  "to  have 

Sunday  exhibitions  of  pictures  begin  at  an  early  hour  in 

the  afternoon,  so  as  not  to  conflict   with  church  services 

held  before  that  time.     We  do  not   say  that  this  would 

be  an  ideal  condition  of  affairs, 

■     but  we  do  think   it  would  be  a 

diplomatic     concession     to     the 

elements    whose   opposition   has 

to  be  reckoned  with.     The  hours 

from  2  p.m.  to  10  p.m.  would  be 

welcome  to  every   exhibitor.     It 

is  a  sad  and  depressing  sight  to 

see     young     men     on    Sundays 

gather   in    knots  at   the   corners 


and  kill  the  precious  hours  by 
coarse  and  stupid  talk  and  the 
ogling  of  all  passers  by,  especi- 
ally young  women.  The  Sunday 
afternoon  and  evening  ought  to  be 
devoted  to  something  far  better 
and  wholesome." 

A  Humorous  Incident. 

A  humorous  incident  at  a 
Walthamstow  Picture  Palace. 
Child  deeply  engrossed  in 
Vitagraph  drama.  Scene  de- 
picting boy  hero  struggling 
for  life  in  river.  Tiny  spec- 
tator's tender  heart  could  stand 
the  strain  no  longer,  and  she 
burst  into  tears.  just  at  that  moment  the  operator 
lost  his  arc,  and  a  brilliant  rainbow  appeared  across 
the  screen.  Mother  noticing  this :  "  There,  there, 
dearie,  don't  cry  ;  look  at  the  beautiful  rainbow  in  the 
picture."  At  same  moment,  to  add  to  the  sequence  of 
coincidences,  the  pianist  commenced  to  thump  out  the 
well-known  tune  "  Rainbow."     A  fact ! 


Our  Employment  Bureau. 

Elsewhere  in  this  issue  will  be  found  full  details  of  a  new 
scheme  we  have  inaugurated  for  the  benefit  of  employers 
and  employed  in  connection  with  cinematograph  theatres. 
Our  idea  is  to  bring  the  two  parties  together  at  no 
trouble  or  expense  to  either,  for  the  benefit  of  both. 
Carefully  compiled  registers  will  be  kept  at  our  offices 
of  situations  of  all  kinds  vacant  and  wanted,  and  we 
shall  be  pleased  to  hear  from  all  who  desire  our  services 
in  this  direction. 

Like  another  "  Good  Thing,"  Fools  of  Society,  The  Great 
Moment,  Gipsy  Blood,  etc.,  are  still  going  strong  (Walturdaw). 


THE     CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


MOVING    PICTURE    POSTERS. 

A     CLEVER     ADVERTISING     DEVICE. 


IS 


T  certain  times  of  the  year  every  manager  finds 
it  difficult  to  ensure  a  satisfactory  attendance 
at  his  theatre.  There  are  various  reasons  for 
this.  In  the  first  place  the  weather  may  be 
altogether  against  indoor  entertainment.  The 
evenings  may  be  too  hot  and  stuffy  for  an  audience  to 
sit  contentedly  in  a  close  and  over-heated  atmosphere  to 
witness  even  the  best  show  going.  There  may  be 
opposition  picture  shows  which  have  to  share  this 
decreasing  attendance.  If  the  theatre  happens  to  be 
in  a  seaside  town  there  will  undoubtedly  be  several 
first-class  al  fresco  entertainments  which  will  assuredly 
draw  away  a  good  percentage  of  those  who  may  be 
looked  upon  in  the  winter 
months  as  regular  patrons. 
There  are  other  reasons  too. 
In  fine,  summer  weather 
it  becomes  increasingly  diffi- 
cult to  persuade  people  that 
they  want  to  see  any  show 
which  involves  sitting  in- 
doors. They  prefer  to  play 
tennis  or  go  for  a  walk  in 
the  country  lanes. 

How    to   Increase   Your 
Audience. 

This  is  the  time  when  the 
theatre  manager  has  to  take 
some  decided  steps  in  order 
not  only  to  stop  the  falling 
away  of  many  patrons,  but  - 
also  to  fill  the  rows  of  seats 
conspicuous  by  their  empti-  ' 
ness.  If  he  be  an  enterpris- 
ing man  —  and  most  mana- 
gers must  at  least  combine 
a  measure  of  enterprise  with  good  management  in  these 
days — he  will  look  around  for  some  means  of  adding  to 
his  falling  revenues.  In  nine  cases  out  of  ten  he  will 
decide  that  he  must  do  a  bit  more  advertising,  that  he 
must  arrange  for  one  or  two  star  films ;  double  the 
number  of  double-crown  bills  posted  each  week — in  a 
word  make  things  "  hum  "  generally.  He  will  find, 
however,  that  advertising  on  ordinary  lines  will  not  bring 
much  result  and  that  unless  he  advertises  aright  the  best 
star  films  in  the  world  will  not  fill  his  theatre  on  a  hot 
summer's  night.  He  must  look  around  for  somethingnovel, 
that  by  its  very  originality  will  succeed  in  compelling  the 
attention  of  passers-by  more  effectively  than  all  the 
loud-voiced,  uniformed  door-attendants  and  all  the 
coloured  posters  so  liberally  plastered  on  the  boards 
outside  his  theatre.  To  find  such  a  novelty  seems  rather 
a  tall  order.  In  reality  it  is  simplicity  itself.  It  is 
ready  to  hand. 

An  Advertising  Novelty. 

An  invention  has  just  been  perfected  which  will  pro- 
vide, at  small  cost,  all  that  he  is  looking  for  in  the  way 
of  an  advertising  novelty.  What  would  the  average 
cinematograph  theatre  manager  say  to  a  moving  picture 


poster  illustrating  in  miniature  the  actual  pictures  being 
thrown  upon  the  screen  within  ?  Impossible  as  this 
may  sound  to  the  uninitiated  this  is  not  only  possible  but 
already  an  accomplished  fact.  Mr.  D.  A.  Thomson,  of 
30,  Hillside  Gardens,  Highgate,  who  has  been  experi- 
menting on  these  lines  for  a  long  time  past  has  at  last 
succeeded  in  perfecting  a  simple  device  which  makes 
this  extraordinary  feat  possible. 

The  Moving  Picture  Poster. 

The  device  illustrated  on  this  page  is  a  perfectly  simple 
one,  although  the  drawings  at  first  sight  may  appear 
somewhat  complex.      The   principle  governing  the  idea 

will  be  readily  understood 
when  we  state  that  the 
miniature  reproduction  of 
the  moving  pictures  thrown 
on  the  screen,  and  seen 
outside  the  building  by 
passers-by,  is  obtained  by 
means  of  various  mirrors 
placed  at  different  angles, 
which  reflect  the  image 
through  a  tube.  It  is  known 
as  Thomson's  Moving  Pic- 
ture Poster  device  and  has 
already  been  patented.  There 
is  nothing  new,  of  course,  in 
the  idea  itself,  which  is  an 
adaptation  of  the  now 
familiar  periscope  used  on 
submarines,  but  as  developed 
and  adapted  by  Mr.  Thomson 
the  idea  is  presented  in  an 
entirely  novel  form.  When 
applied  to  night  advertising 
on  a  larger  scale  it  will  no 
doubt  prove  a  very  powerful  rival  to  existing  methods, 
and  it  seems  more  than  possible  that  it  may  revolutionise 
such  means  of  night  advertising  as  at  present  exist. 

An  Unfailing  Attraction. 

But  it  is  as  a  means  of  advertising  the  cinematograph 
theatre  and  popularising  its  entertainments  that  we  are 
specially  concerned,  and  as  such  its  value  cannot  well  be 
exaggerated.  Moving  pictures  are  always  an  attraction, 
and  it  is  easy  to  see  how  effective  an  advertisement  such 
a  device  as  Thomson's  Moving  Picture  Poster  would  be 
when  placed  in  a  prominent  position  outside  a  cinemato- 
graph theatre.  To  throw  one  of  the  star  films  upon  the 
miniature  screen  at  intervals  during  the  evening  would 
be  an  absolutely  unfailing  means  of  attracting  the  atten- 
tion of  the  crowd  and  getting"the  people  inside. 

We  understand  that  it  is  Mr.  Thomson's  intention  to 
arrange  for  a  practical  demonstration  of  his  clever  and 
useful  advertising  device  at  a  well-known  London 
cinematograph  theatre  in  the  near  future,  and  we 
strongly  advise  every  manager  desirous  of  ensuring  a 
good  attendance  at  his  picture  theatre  during  the 
summer  months  to  make  a  point  of  seeing  it  at  work 
and  secure  it  for  his  own  use. 


June,  1912.  THE     CINEMA. 


THE    FILM    RENTING    EXPERTS. 


FILMS 

LIMITED. 

Head     Office : 

18  &  20  MANCHESTER  STREET,  LIVERPOOL. 

A.    T.    WRIGHT,    Managing    Director. 
Branches : 


Telephone  6782  Central. 
Telegrams  Films,  Liverpool. 


23      CECIL     COURT,  ¥    _f\lWr\_r%lW  \«/    f*  Telephone  5783  Central. 

CHARING     CROSS     ROAD,  L*\Jl  1  mJKJL 1  a         WaV'a        Telegrams  Filmitted,  London. 


MIDLAND     CHAMBERS,"  NFWPA^TIp1    HIM    TYMF  Telephone32021  Central. 

17     WESTGATE     ROAD,  llH  VY  V/VlJ  I  LiEi"V/ll~  I  I  11  El*       Telegrams  Animated,  Newcastle-on  Tyne. 

8     WYNDHAM     ARCADE,  _P  ADIMPP  Telephone  3440  Cardiff. 

ST.     MARY'S     STREET,    "      V/MKlyir  T  a        Telegrams  sAnimated,  Cardiff. 

35     HIGH     STREET, f^fT  I    IT  A  ^HP  Telephone  3107. 


Telegrams  Films,  Belfast. 


16     D'OLIER    STREET, 


\3  \J  JDlw'H   1  a  Telegrams  Films,  Dublin. 

The    PREMIER    and    EUREKA    FILM    SERVICE    are    par    excellence. 


Provincial   Agents   by  appointment  for  the 

E  R  N  E  M  A  N  N 


IMPERATOR. 


10 


THE     CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


MEN     OF     THE     MOMENT 

IN    THE    CINEMATOGRAPH    WORLD. 

■         No.  V. — Mr.    G.     H.    Smith,    of    the    Vitagraph    Company.         . 


EVERYBODY  in  the  Trade  knows  "Uncle."  No  need 
to  mention  his  name.  He  is  simply  "Uncle"  to  all 
and  sundry,  and  no  man  could  desire  more  sincere 
proof  of  the  esteem  and  regard  in  which  he  is  held  by 
those  with  whom  his  business  brings  him  in  daily 
contact. 

The  secret  of  his  popularity  is  obvious.  His  personality  radiates 
bonhomie.  His  ever  genial  s-mile  is  as  a  tonic,  his  optimistic 
outlook  upon  life  is  as  refreshing  as  it  is  rare,  and  as  rare  as  it  is 
refreshing.  "  Uncle  "  is  always  to  be  found  in  "  Flicker  Alley." 
Whenever  you  call  at  the  offices  of  the  Vitagraph  Company  he  is 
almost  sure  to  be  full  of  work,  but  he  is  never  too  busy  to  spare 
you  "  just  a  minute."  Mr.  George  Henry  Smith — to  give  him  his 
full  baptismal  name — is  one  of  the  figureheads  of  the  Cinemato- 
graph Industry,  and  wherever  two  or  three  gather  together  his 
name  is  sure  to  crop  up.  Smiths,  the  world  over,  are  as  plenti  ul 
as  blackberries  in  autumn,  but  there  is  only  one  Cinema 
Smith,  and  he  is  known  wherever  moving  pictures  are  shown. 
He  is  almost  as  well  known  among  exhibitors  as  the  trade  mark 
upon  the  Vitagraph  films,  and  that  is  raying  a  good  deal.  He  is 
a  man  of  Kent,  and  tells  you  with  a  pardonable  ring  of  pride  that 
the  company,  whose  iuterests  he  serves  so  untiringly  in  this 
country,  was  founded  and  is  run  entirely  by  Englishmen,  though 
its  home  is  "  the  other  side." 

An  English  Directorate. 

One  has  often  noticed  certain  peculiarly  English  touches  about  the 
Vitagraph  films — touches  quite  indefinable,  but  nevertheless  very 
real — and  Mr.  Smith's  explanation  that  the  company  is  directed  by 
Englishmen  probably  explains  their  presence.  Any  way,  it  is  very 
pleasant  to  find  that  one  of  the  greatest  film  firms  in  this  or  any 
other  country  was  founded  with  English  capital,  and  carried  to 
success  by  English  brains  and  enterprise.  The  responsible  heads 
of  the  American  Vitagraph  Company  are  Mr.  Albert  E.  Smith 
(brother  of  the  subject  of  our  interview),  Mr.  William  T.  Rock,  and 
Mr.  Stuart  J.  Blackton,  all  of  them  originally  from  the  old  country, 
though  they  have  been  settlers  in  the  States  for  upwards  of  a 
quarter  of  a  century  now.  "  Uncle,"  be  it  said,  is  an  enthusias.ic 
motorist,  and  enjoys  nothing  so  much  as  a  spin  in  his  20  horse- 
power Vauxhall  car  in  the  quiet  byways  of  Kent.  Talk  to  him 
of  the  natural  beauties  of  the  Kentish  Weald,  and  casually  men- 
tion Faversham,  his  native  town,  and  he  waxes  eloquent  at  once. 
Last  year  he  did  just  on  15,000  miles  in  his  car,  and  nearly  all  in 
Kent.  Like  so  many  others  in  the  Trade  he  is  a  member  of  the 
Craft,  and  a  brother,  and  incidentally  declares  allegiance  to  the 
Paddington  Lodge.  He  is  also  an  amateur  gardener  of  parts,  and 
can  talk  to  you  of  rhododendrons  and  peach  trees  in  quite 
technical  language. 

Origin  of  a  Nickname. 

How  he  came  to  be  known  to  his  friends  and  intimates  as 
"  Uncle"  is  a  story  in  itself.  At  the  start  there  were  three  of 
them — Mr.  F.  R.  Griffiths,  of  the  New  Bio  Trading  Company  ;  Mr. 
Harold  Hough  (now  no  longer  in  business  in  the  Court),  and 
himself.  Close  friends  and  allies,  they  did  not  care  to  call  one 
another  by  their  Christian  names,  and  so  each  was  known  to  the 
other  as  "  Uncle,"  and  their  wives  as  "  Aunty."  In  stating  this 
I  am  betraying  no  confidence.  Mr.  Smith  himself  explained  the 
origin  of  the  name.  Gradually  his  friends  in  the  Trade  came  to 
know  him  by  the  nickname  used  by  the  circle  of  three,  and  now  he 
is  seldom  referred  to  in  any  other  way. 

"A  Tale  of  Two  Cities." 

"'A  Tale  of  Two  Cities  'j?  Yes,  certainly  one  of  the  finest 
films  we  have  ever  handled,  and  one  of  our  biggest  successes.    But 


all  films  are  not  made  of  such  material.  Dickens'  story 
is  so  full  of  fine  incident,  such  romance  and  pathos,  such  fine 
scenes,  such  variety  of  characterisation  that  it  was  bound  to  make 
a  fine  film  if  properly  handled.  And  from  the  point  of  view  01 
stage  management  and  quality  of  tone  I  think  we  may  say  that  it 
was  all  that  the  most  fastidious  could  desire.  Anyway,  it  proved 
an  immense  draw,  and  over  200,000  feet  of  the  film  we're  printed 
for  the  English  sales.  Of  course,  the  film  also  had  a  remarkable 
sale  on  the  Continent. 

"A  big  publicity  campaign?  Rather!  It  was  a  three-reel 
subject,  and  we  sold  over  15,000  posters,  besides  printing  some- 
thing like  152,000  four-page  illustrated  circulars  on  art  paper. 
There  is  not  one  foot  of  'padding'  in  the  film.  The  public 
simply  rushed  to  see  it.  It  stimulated  interest  in  Dickens'  works 
in  a  most  remarkable  manner,  and  the  publishers  of  the  novel  must 
have  found  themselves  hard  put  to  it  to  meet  the  demand .  I  know  of 
more  than  one  instance  where  exhibitors  bought  up  every  copy  of 
the  book  they  could  lay  their  hands  on,  in  order  to  resell  them  to 
their  patrons. 

German  Methods. 

"  It  is  amusing  to  recall  that  the  film  was  turned  down  in  Berlin 
because  of  the  murder  scene  in  the  second  act.  You  will 
remember  that  the  old  Marquis  is  murdered,  but  the  actual  murder 
is  not  seen.  They  did  not  care  for  this  in  Berlin,  and  the  licence 
was  refused,  but  elsewhere  in  Germany  it  was  licensed  by  the 
local  officials  and  met  with  a  most  enthusiastic  reception.  Just 
before  we  released  '  A  Tale  of  Two  Cities  '  we  ran  a  narrow 
shave  of  having  the  whole  of  the  film  burned  by  the  fire  which 
took  place  on  the  Globe  Film  Company's  premises — these  very 
offices,  in  fact.  We  were  then  at  No.  25,  and  feeling  anxious  as  to 
the  safety  of  our  stock— and  especially  of  this  much-boomed 
film — we  had  a  car  waiting  at  the  end  of  the  Court  to  convey  it 
away  had  it  been  necessary.  'A  Tale  of  Two  Cities'  was  the 
only  film  we  released  that  week,  and  as  it  happened  to  come  on  the 
market  when  there  was  nothing  else  like  it  to  be  got  we  did 
emarkably  v\ell  with  it. 

"  In  America,  you  know,  we  have  a  different  system  of  releases 
to  that  in  vogue  in  England.  One  huge  renting  establishment, 
controlled  by  the  different  manufacturers  of  the  Motion  Picture 
Patents  Company,  takes  the  whole  of  the  products  of  the  eight  or 
nine  firms  in  the  combine,  and  does  all  the  releasing,  the  dates 
only  being  fixed  by  the  manufacturers.  They  find  this  system 
works  very  well  in  the  interest  01  all  concerned. 

The  Vitagraph  Company,  Ltd. 

"  The  Vitagraph  Company  in  America  was  the  first  American 
concern  to  establish  a  factory  in  Europe.  At  the  outset,  premises 
were  taken  in  a  central  position  and  fitted  up  as  a  factory,  but 
before  very  long  the  business  altogether  outgrew  the  accommoda- 
tion, and  we  were  forced  to  buy  a  site  and  build  for  ourselves. 
Now  we  possess,  what  I  think  we  may  say  is  one  of  the  finest 
cinematograph  factories  on  the  Continent,  and,  as  you  know,  all 
our  printing  for  the  English  business  is  done  in  Paris.  At  the  end 
of  June,  by  the  way,  we  are  turning  this  branch  of  the 
business  into  a  limited  liability  company,  and  we  shall  then  be 
known  as  the  the  Vitagraph 
Company,  Limited. 

"  Going  away  for  Whitsun  ? 
Yes,  motoring  in  Kent  for  two  or  1/^^ 
three    days.       I'll   tell    you   all  ^^ 

about  it  when  I  get  back." 


June,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


11 


nn 


OUR     PORTRAIT     GALLERY. 


nn 


MR.  G.    H.    SMITH. 

( Vitagraph  Company.) 


UNCLE.' 


THE     CINEMA. 


ESSA^/Y      ALL    THE     QUALITIES     ESSENTIAL     TO     PERFECT 
PHOTOPLAYS     ARE     FOUND     AT     THEIR    BEST    IN 


ESSAMAY 


"F./s/s/o/wa/\A 


tooiOPLtfS 


BEAR    THIS     IN     MIND    WHEN     ARRANGING     YOUR     PROGRAMMES. 

IT     WILL     I>AY     YOU.    


hoTOPLAVS 


RELEASED 
SUNDAY, 
JUNE  23. 


THE    INDIAN    AND    THE    CHILD. 

IN    THIS    INDIAN    DRAMA    MR.   G.   M.   ANDERSON'S   PORTRAYAL   OF  THE    INDIAN 


IS     ONE     OF     HIS     FINEST     CHARACTER     STUDIES. 


A    FEATURE. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

1,000  FEET. 


RELEASED 

THURSDAY, 

JUNE  27. 


DEAD    MAN'S    CLAIM. 

A     FINE     HUMAN     INTEREST     STORY    PLAYED    IN    THE    "LAND    OF    THE    DEAD 
THINGS."     WITH     A     CLIMAX     STARTLING     IN     REALISTIC     INTENSITY. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

994   FEET. 


BsEuLN^ASYED  OUT    OF     THE     NIGHT.  --- 

JUNE  30.  AN    UNUSUAL   DRAMATIC   MASTERPIECE,    FEATURING   Mr.    FRANK   X.  BUSHMAN.  990  FEET. 


RELEASED 

THURSDAY, 

JULY    4. 


NAPATIA,     THE     GREEK     SINGER. 

A    FINE    SPECTACULAR    ROMANCE    INVOLVING    THE    FIRE    DEPARTMENT. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

992  FEET. 


released       BRONCHO   BILLY  AND  THE    BANDITS.  approx. 

SUNDAY,               a    SENSATIONAL    WESTERN    DRAMA,    WITH     MR.    G.    M.    ANDERSON     IN     HIS  LENGTH, 

JULY  7.                  WORLD-FAMOUS      ROLE    OF    BRONCHO    BILLY.         THIS    PHOTOPLAY    SHOULD  994    FEET. 

BE    A    TOP    LINER    ON    EVERY    PROGRAMME. 


RELEASED 

THURSDAY, 

JULY    11. 


A     SOUL     RECLAIMED. 

A    VERY    FINE    DRAMATIC    PHOTOPLAY    BY   OUR   EASTERN    COMPANY,    WITH 
A    PLOT    WHICH    WILL    INTEREST    ONK    AND    ALL. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

998  FEET. 


RELEASED 


THE     EYE     THAT     NEVER     SLEEPS. 


APPROX. 


SUNDAY,        The  FIRST  of  a  SERIES  of  SECRET  SERVICE  MELODRAMAS  IN  WHICH  FRANK  X.  BUSHMAN         LENGTH 
JULY  14  IS  FEATURED  IN  THE  ROLE  OF  HOWARD  MAYNE,  THE  SHERLOCK  HOLMES  OF  AMERICA.       oqr  feet 

'  THESE  DRAMAS  WILL  PROVE  THE  LAST  WORD  IN    PHOTOPLAY    EXCELLENCE.  ' 


RELEASED 

THURSDAY, 

JULY   18. 


SHERIFF     AND     HIS     MAN. 

FROM    FIRST   TO    LAST   THIS    WESTERN    DRAMA    WITH    MR.  G.  M.  ANDERSON    AS 
"THE    MAN,"     IS    ONE    OF    THE    FINEST    PRODUCTIONS    THAT    MASTER    PHOTO- 
PLAYER  HAS  EVER  PRODUCED. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

998  FEET. 


RELEAS     D 

THURSDAY, 

JULY  18. 


AFTER    THE    REWARD. 

A    TYPICAL     ESSANAV     EASTERN     COMEDY    WHICH     WILL     MAKE    YOUR 
THEATRE     RING     WITH     LAUGHTER. 


APPROX. 

LENGTH, 

993     FEET. 


RELEASED 


A    WESTERN     LEGACY. 


APPROX. 


SUNDAY,  WHEN  OUR  MR.  G.  M.  ANDERSON  SETS  HIS  HAND  TO  COMEDY  YOU  ARE  ASSURED  LENGTH, 
JULY    21.            OF    SOMETHING    ORIGINAL    BOTH    IN    PLOT    AND    SETTING.       He    has  surpassed          996  FEET. 
himself  in  this  Photoplay  and  you  can  write  It  down  as  a  feature  romantic  Western. 


RELEASED 


DETECTIVE     DOROTHY. 


APPROX. 


SUNDAY,  A    SENSATIONAL    SECRET    SERVICE   DRAMA,    SHOWING    HOW    LITTLE    FRANCIS  LENGTH, 

JULY  21.  OSMAN,    OUR    WONDERFUL    CHILD     ACTRESS,    CAUSES     THE     ARREST    OF     THE  998  FEET. 

MURDERER.         A    FEATURE. 


released  THE     DESERT     SWEETHEART.  approx. 

THURSDAY,         A    BEAUTIFUL    WESTERN    DRAMA,  WITH  VEDAH  BERTRAM  AND  G.  M.ANDERSON  LENGTH, 

JULY  25.  IN    THE     LEADING    ROLES.         THIS     ONE     WILL     CAUSE     A    SENSATION     AMONG  996  FEET. 

YOUR    AUDIENCE. 


NOW 
READY. 


SPECIAL     ANNOUNCEMENT. 

By  Special  Request  we  have  prepared  a  Genuine  Photogravure  Portrait  of  G.  M.  Anderson  (Broncho  Billy), 
Quad.  Crown,  with  Artistic  Coloured  Lithographic  Border.  GREAT  ATTRACTION  for  LOBBY  or  FRONT. 
Price:  9/-   perdoz.     Single.  Copies :  1Qcl.  each,  post  paid.  Cash  with  Order. 


NOW 
READY. 


Telephone:     2129  CITY. 
Telegrams  :     "  ESSAFILM. 


Essanay  Film  Mfg.  Co., 


A.     SPOOR,     Sole     Distributor, 

WARDOUR      STREET,      W. 


Cablegrams: 
"ESSANAY,       LONDON." 

Codes: 
WESTERN   UNION  A. B.C. 


June.   1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


13 


APPROPRIATE    MUSIC   IN   THE   CINEMA 

THEATRE. 


HE  question  of  appropriate  music  in  the  cinema 
theatre,  discussed  in  recent  issues  of  this 
magazine,  is  attracting  considerable  attention. 
Below  we  print  two  very  interesting  com- 
munications on  the  subject,  and  we  are  bound 

to  admit  that   the  contention  put 

forward  by  Mr.  Lowry  is  worthy 

the    attention    of    many    theatre 

proprietors. 

Mr.  Anthony  Lowry  writes  from 

the  Prince  of  Wales  Picture  Play- 
house, Harrow  Road,  W. : — "Re 

the    appropriate    music    question 

in   your  correspondence  columns, 

I  beg   to   differ  very  much   from 

Miss  Suzanne  Basset.    The  music 

in   the  majority  of  halls  is  rotten. 

Some  of  them   advertise  '  Bohe- 
mian Band,'  Herr  Schloshenboski 

conductor,    from    Milan.       These 

orchestras  are  anything  but  what 

their  name  implies.  A  Roumanian 

band  or  some  such  band  is  gener- 


"THE    MOVING 
PICTURE    WORLD, 


"  I  can  assure  you  that  the  London  and  provincial 
managers  who  have  any  idea  what  music  is  are  very, 
very  few.  Look  again  at  the  abominable  instruments 
provided  in  many  places.  How  can  any  manager  judge 
a  pianist  on  some  tinpots  which  one  is  expected  to  play 
on  ?  The  remedy  for  bad  music 
is  to  get  good  workers,  and  pay 
them  £2  10s.  to  £5  per  week, 
which  they  would  certainly  be 
worth.  Only  this  week  there  is 
an  advertisement  in  one  of  your 
contemporaries  :  '  Good  musicians 
earn  £2- £6  weekly.'  I  am 
writing  from  a  manager's  point 
of  view." 


The  leading  Trade  paper 
in        America       says  : — 


its     success 


assured. 


ally   made    up    of   Germans   and 

Dutchmen,  and  they  scrape  away 

under   the    impression    that    their 

uniform   is  the  chief  item.      The 

reason  why  music  in  the  majority 

of   picture    halls    is    not   what   it 

should  be  is  because  the  money 

paid    to    the  poor    beggars    who 

have  to  make  it  is  horribly  small. 

\\  hat  is  30s.  a  week  ?      A  manager  pays    /"20  -  £30   a 

week    for    his    films,    and    30s.   to    his    pianist.       If   an 

advertisement     is     inserted    in     the    paper,    '  Wanted, 

Pianist,'  a  few   artists   who  can    play   turn  up,    80  per 

cent,   turn   up   who  are    absolute    'duds.'      These    ask 

20s.    per    week     or     thereabouts,     and    are     accepted 

by   the    majority    of  managers   on   account   of  the  low 

price.  Can  one  then  expect  music  from  this  class  of  artist  ? 


Judging    by  the  first   two 

of   THE    CINEMA 

already 


issues 


Messrs.  Murdoch,  Murdoch  and 
Co.  write  from  461,  Oxford  Street, 
W. :  "  We  were  interested  in  your 
correspondence  last  month  on  the 
subject  of  appropriate  music,  and 
specially  in  the  letter  from  the 
Clapham  lady  which  speaks  of  the 
excellence  of  the  music  at  Clap- 
ham  and  Brixton. 

"  Mr.  Israel  Davies  is  welt 
known  as  having  emphatic  ideas  of 
having  good  music  in  his  theatres, 
^-*  and  the  beautiful  organs  which 
we  have  installed  in  his  theatres 
at  Clapham  and  Brixton,  where 
they  prove  of  the  utmost  value,  have  no  doubt 
influenced  the  lady  to  write  to  you  of  her  good 
opinion  of  the  Clapham  and  Brixton  musical  arrange- 
ments. 

"  We  have  in  our  show-rooms  here  a  very  beautiful 
pipe  organ,  containing  some  charming  effects,  which  we 
are  always  pleased  to  demonstrate  to  any  person  inter- 
ested in  the  Cinema  world." 


THE     KING    OF    AUSTRALIAN     PICTURE     MEN. 


LIKE  an  Arabian  Nights'  tale  reads  the  story 
of  the  success  that  has  come  to  Mr.  J.  D. 
Williams,  who  is  known  as  the  picture 
king  of  Australia,  now  touring  America  and 
Europe. 

Three  years  ago  Mr.  Williams,  who  is  an  American, 
was  a  salesman  for  a  film  concern.  His  business  took 
him  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific  coasts  of  the 
United  States  and  along  the  western  coast  up  into 
British  Columbia.  It  was  while  in  the  latter  territory 
that  Mr.  Williams  first  heard  of  the  "  wonders  of  Aus- 
tralia." A  home-sick  Australian  told  him  of  the  coun- 
try's possibilities,  and  after  verifying  most  of  the  facts 
by  consulting   reference  books,   Mr.    Williams    started 


A  mine  of  information  in  a  Walturdaw  Catalogue, 
it,  post  free  9d. 


Send  for 


for  Australia,  and  embarked  in  the  amusement  business 
in  Sydney. 

Within  one  year  he  became  one  of  the  largest  ex- 
hibitors in  the  world.  To-day  the  Greater  J.  D. 
Williams  Amusement  Co.,  Limited,  owns  four  large 
picture  houses  in  Sydney,  and  has  laid  plans  for  the 
establishment  of  a  string  of  houses  throughout  Aus- 
tralia.     It  also  operates  a  huge  film  exchange. 

Prompted  by  gratitude  towards  the  country  which 
gave  him  his  vast  fortune,  Mr.  Williams  now  is  en- 
deavouring to  people  it  with  Americans  and  English- 
men, and  has  set  aside  a  portion  of  his  wealth  to  tell 
these  two  races  of  Australia's  possibilities. 

The  Power  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40 10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


14 


THE     CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


THE     KING     AND     KINEMACOLOR. 

ROYALTY    SEES    ITSFXF    UPON   THE    SCREEN. 

The  recent  visit  of  the  King  and  Queen  to  the  Scala  Theatre  to  witness  the  Kinemacolor  pictures  of  the  Durbar  is  a 
unique  event  in  the  annals  of  Cinematography.  No  less  than  eight  other  Royal  personages,  including  Queen  Alexandra 
and  the  Dowager  Empress    of  Russia,    accompanied    Their    Majesties.     The  following   impressionist  sketch  is  written  by  a 

member  of  The  Cinema  staff  whose  privilege  it  was  to  be  present. 


A  MOST  interesting  evening,  and  one  that  will  live  long 
in  the  memory. 
I  had  heard  so  much  about  the  Kinemacolor  pic- 
tures of  the  Durbar,  but  like  so  many  others  I  had  not 
yet  seen  them.  And  now  that  I  have  done  so  words 
fail  altogether  to  express  one's  feelings,  as  one  sat 
comfortably  in  a  cushioned  arm-chair  and  witnessed  all  the  grand 
pageantry  of  what  was,  perhaps,  the  greatest  gathering  of  Indian 
personalities  that  has  ever  been  drawn  to  the  presence  of  their 
Sovereign.  Such  a  feast  of  gorgeous  colouring  has  surely  never 
been  seen  in  a  London  theatre  before.  It  was  all  very  wonderful. 
A  short  journey  to  the  Scala  Theatre,  which  stands  on  the  site 
of  the  old  Prince  of  Wales'  Theatre,  reminiscent  of  the 
Bancrofts  and  their  palmy  days.  The  lights  are  turned 
down  and  we  are  transported  to  that  great  Indian  Empire 
which  is  the  envy  of  every  other  civilised  country  in  the  world 
Before  our  wondering  gaze  are  unfolded  all  the  magnificence,  all 
the  splendour,  all  the  beauty  of  Oriental  colouring,  which  were  so 
remarkable  a  feature  of  the  crowning  of  our  King  and  Queen  in 
India.  So  perfect  was  the  reproduction  of  the  natural  colours  of 
the  scene  upon  the  screen  that  it  required  but  little  effort  of  the 
imagination  to  see  oneself  a  member  of  that  vast  and  orderly  crowd 
of  dusky  sightseers,  waiting  patiently  with  the  rays  of  the  sun 
beating  mercilessly  down  upon  their  heads  till  the  Emperor  of 
all  the  Indies,  and  his  Consort,  appear  in  the  vast  arena. 

The  Royal  Party. 

One  could  almost  hear  the  great  shout  of  welcome  from  hun- 
dreds of  thou-ands  ef  the  King's  loyal  subjects  as  the  Royal 
procession  made  its  way  to  the  beautiful  canopy  upon  which  all 
eyes  were  fixed,  and  Majesty  seated  itself  upon  the  waiting 
thrones ;  and  only  a  lew  minutes  before  the  self-same  ceremony  of 
ushering  Royalty  to  its  seats  had  been  enacted  here  before  our  eyes. 
To  the  Scala  Theatre  had  come  the  King  and  Queen,  with  a  large 
family  rarty,  to  see  once  again  all  the  glories  of  the  great  ceremony 
in  which  they  had  played  the  leading  parts.  In  the  Royal  box, 
within  a  few  feet  ot  us,  sat  King  George  and  Queen  Mary,  Queen 
Alexandra,  the  Dowager  Empress  of  Russia,  Princess  Henry  of 
Battenberg,  Princess  Victoria,  the  Grand  Duchess  Olga,  Prince 
Peter,  and  the  Duke  and  Duchess  of  Teck.  Seldom,  if  ever,  have 
so  many  Royalties  been  present  at  an  ordinary  performance  in  any 
theatre.  The  Queen  wore  a  gown  of  shell  pink  brocade  with  pearl 
and  diamond  embroideries,  and  a  diamond  and  sapphire  tiara  and 
necklace.  Queen  Alexandra  was  attired  in  dull  black,  but  her 
widow's  cap  was  relieved  in  front  by  a  small  pair  of  diamond 
wings,  and  she  wore  a  diamond  dog  collar.  This,  I  believe  was 
one  of  Her  Majesty's  first  appearances  at  a  theatre  since  the  death 
of  King  Edward. 

A  Memorable  Occasion. 

To  witness  the  Durbar  pictures  in  the  actual  presence  of  the 
King  was  the  next  best  thing  to  seeing  it  in  reality.  Only  those 
who  were  present  on  this  memorable  occasion  can  appreciate  to 
the  full  how  absolutely  real  the  whole  scene  seemed.  It  almost 
lived  with  all  its  marvellous  movement  and  sense  of  expansiveness, 
its  perfect  atmosphere,  and  its  blaze  of  Oriental  colouring,  as  one 
saw  it  in  the  company  of  those  who  had  been  the  chief  actors  upon 
this  beautiful  stage.  I  am  quite  sure  that  everyone  must  have  felt 
the  same. 


Silencing  the  King. 

We  were  near  enough  to  the  Royal  box  to  see  how  thoroughly 
the  King  and  Queen  and  their  party  enjoyed  the  novel  experience 
of  seeing  themselves  as  others  saw  them.  One  could  also  clearly 
hear  the  remarks  passing  between  the  King  and  Queen  Alexandra, 
who  sat  next  to  him.  Owing  to  the  Queen  Mother's  sad  affliction, 
the  King  had  to  raise  his  voice  somewhat  in  order  that  she  might 
hear  what  he  said.  This  led  to  a  somewhat  disconcerting — 
a'though  amusing — incident.  Sounds  of  "  Ssh  !  Ssh  !  "  arose  from 
different  parts  of  the  house,  and  it  was  some  little  time  before  the 
audience  realised  that  it  had  been  endeavouring  to  silence  the 
King  !  Such  remarks  as  floated  down  to  us  in  the  stalls  were  full 
of  interest,  and  show  how  thoroughly  human  Royalty  is. 

"  Is  that  me  ?  " 

"Is  that  me?" — with  the  accent  on  the  me.  We  heard  the 
Queen  distinctly  ask  the  que  tion  of  her  Royal  spouse.  Then 
Queen  Alexandra's  voice — foft  and  sweet — "  Did  you  have  to  read 
sornt  thing  ?  "  as  the  pictures  on  the  screen  showed  Lord  Hardinge 
handing  a  scroll  to  the  King  at  the  Durbar  Shamiana,  when  the 
high  officials  and  ruling  chiefs  did  homage  to  their  Sovereign. 
The  scene  which,  however,  seemed  to  impress  the  Royal  visitors 
most  was  the  review  of  50,000  troops,  and  they  applauded  frequently 
as  the  wonderful  picture  of  probably  the  most  wonderful  review 
which  the  world  has  ever  seen  unfolded  itself.  It  is  something 
stupendous,  and  the  effect  left  upon  the  mind  was  one  of  inex- 
p-essible  wonderment  as  to  how  it  could  all  be  reproduced  so 
taithfully. 

Mr.  Charles  Urban's  Greatest  Film. 

Of  all  the  many  pictures  which  Mr.  Charles  Urban  secured  in 
India,  this  is  certainly  the  greatest  and  the  one  of  which  he  has 
reason  to  feel  most  proud,  for  it  shows  more  than  all  the  others 
put  together — fine  as  many  of  them  are — how  great  are  the 
possibilities  of  the  Kinemacolor  process.  And  mention  of  the 
inventor  calls  to  mind  the  feeling  of  regret  which  W4sfeltby  all 
who  knew  the  reason  which  prevented  Mr.  Charles  Urban  being 
present  to  share  in  the  triumph  of  which  this  memorable  evening 
was  a  fitting  termination.  May  he  soon  be  himself  again,  renewed 
in  health  and  strength,  to  go  on  developing  the  wonderful  process 
which  he  has  made  his  own. 

A  Word  in  Conclusion. 

A  word  in  conclusion  The  Royal  Party  came  and  went  without 
ceremony.  At  the  Scala  Theatre  they  were  received  by  Dr.  E 
Di-tin  Maddick,  and  the  Royal  box,  designed  by  Mr.  Frank  Verity, 
F.R.I.B.A.,  the  architect  of  the  theatre,  was  so  arranged  as  to 
create  the  impression  that  the  visitors  were  seated  under  the  same 
canopy  as  at  the  Durbar.  The  colour  scheme  of  the  interior  was 
pale  biscuit ;  the  roof  was  supported  by  bronze  columns,  and  the 
whole  was  draped  with  a  crimson  valance,  and  decked  with  a 
profusion  cf  flowers  and  plants.  As  the  Royal  party  left  at  the 
close  of  the  performance  and  one  made  one's  way  out  again  into 
the  drab  surroundings  of  Tottenham  Court  Road,  the  beautiful 
scenes  of  the  Durbar  floated  away — away — away  !  But  the 
memory  of  the  evening  with  the  King  at  the  Pictures  remains. 

D.  L.  W. 


June,  1912. 


THE     CINEMA. 


15 


A   Pifture  Palace  Star. 


Hepworth,  PhDto. 


MISS    GLADYS    SYLVANI. 
The  most  photographed  Aclrsss  in  the  Picture  Theatre  world. 


16 


THE     CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


A  Quartette   that 
will  pack  your  halls 


Released  Saturday,  15th  June. 


Length  1,000  feet. 


The  Old  Silver  Watch. 

An  Heirloom  that  saves  the  life  of  its  owner,  and  serves  to  establish  a 
brother's  and  sister's  relationship,  after  years  of  separation. 


MAURICE 
COSTELLO. 


Released  Thursday,  27th  June. 


Approximate  Length  767  feet. 


RALPH   INCE. 


The   Seventh  Son. 

Abraham  Lincoln's  wisdom,  justice  and  mercy  never  reached  a  grander 
and  more  eloquent  climax  than  in  **  The  Seventh  Son."  A  widowed 
mother  loses  six  sons  in  the  Civil  War ;  the  President  pardons  and  saves 

her  seventh. 


Released  6th  June. 


Approximate  Length  561  feet. 


A  Story  of  the  Circus. 

Mutual  affection  of  a  little  circus  performer  and  an  elephant. 
Full  of  humour  and  pathos. 


KENNETH  CASEY. 


Released  Saturday,  22nd  June. 


Length  524  feet. 


JOHN  BUNNY. 


The  Suit  of  Armour. 

Suitable  for  a  big  laugh ;  fits  in  anywhere.  A  clever  joke  proves  too  much 
for  a  stern  parent.  Escapes  from  a  ferocious  dog,  gets  away  with  the  girl, 
and  wins  $10,000  from  her  father.  The  fun  in  it  is  worth  twice  the  amount. 


THE  VITAGRAPH  COMPANY  OF  AMERICA, 

15  and    17,    CECIL    COURT,    CHARING    CROSS    ROAD,    W.C. 


Telegrams : 
Vitagraf,    London." 


W 


Telephone : 
14277    Central. 


Supplement  to    "The  Cinema,"  June,  1912. 


JUNE,     1912. 


"THE  CINEMA"  critic  attends  the  leading  film  demonstrations,  and  all  films  reviewed  in  this 
Supplement  have  been  selected  from  the  various  programmes  of  releases  during 
the  ensuing  month. 

EXHIBITORS    CAN     RELY    UPON     "THE    CINEMA"     FILM    SELECTION    AS     BEING    THE     PICK 

OF    THE     MARKET. 


A.   &    C. 

J.  F.  Brookliss. 


"THE  ANIMATED  BATH  TUB."— Released  June  26th. 
Length  640  feet. 

In  this  rollicking  farce  it's  "  you  push  the  button  "  and  the  bath 
tub  does  "the  rest."  An  inventor  has  produced  a  bath  which 
can  be  made  to  wander  from  room  to  room  by  the  mere  turning 
of  an  electric  button.  When  poor  innocent  uncle  visits  his 
nephew  he  is  invited  to  try  the  new  device  and  foolishly  acqui- 
esces. He  gets  in  and  it  starts  on  its  peregrinations.  After 
performing  "  the  grand  tour  "  he  is  rescued,  but  not  until  he  has 
gone  through  the  time  of  his  life. 


A.    BIOGRAPH. 

M.P.  Sales  Agency. 


"HIS   LESSON."— Released  July  14th.     Length  1,032  feet. 

He  had  no  thought  but  to  work  and  save  money.  His  poor 
wife  did  nothing  but  drudge,  with  no  return  other  than  an 
existence.  This  cannot  last ;  it  poisons  one's  spirit  in  time.  Day 
after  day  it  was  work,  without  an, -affectionate  word  or  glance  from 
her  husband,  who  always  met  her  plea  for  a  new  hat  or  dress  with 
the  expression,  ' '  We  cannot  afford  it — we  must  save  our  money  ; 
besides,  your  hat  and  dress  are  goodaenough.''  One  day  a  young 
man  stops  at  the  farm-house  to  get  a  drink  of  water.     He  imagines 


from  her  sad  face  that  all  is  not  as  it  should  be,  and  tells  her  tha 
her  eyes  are  too  beautiful  for  tears  and  her  hands  too  delicate  to 
carry  the  burdens  set  for  her.  The  husband  sees  and  hears  and  is 
at  last  made  to  realise  that  her  life,  without  the  sunshine  of  love, 
is  but  a  little  better  than  death,  and  so  he  makes  a  change  for  the 
better. 


AMBROSIO. 

New  Agency  Film  Co.,  Shaftesbury  Av. 


"INGRATITUDE  REPAID."— Released  June  13th.  Length 
820  feet. 

This  subject  might  be  described  as  a"  spoof  drama, ' '  for  while 
the  opening  might  lead  one  to  suppose  it  likely  to  develop  into  a 
stereotyped  story  of  domestic  unhappiness,  it  actually  includes  a 
series  of  fresh  comedy  scenes  with  a  surprise  in  the  last  scene 
both  for  the  audience  and  for  two  of  the  characters. 


AMERICAN    CO. 

American  Film  Manufacturing  Co., 
ioi,  Wardour  Street,  W. 


"  THE  COWARD."— Released  June  5th.     Length  1,000  feet. 

A  coward,  strung  to  the  breaking  point,  turns  and  kills  his  man. 
The  picture  shows  the  man-hunt  and  how  the  coward,  fleeing  for 
life,  bravely  did  a  human  act.     The  story  is  powerfully  con  vine- 


^k  1 

the  farmer's  daughter"     (Cricks  and  Martin) 


cold  steel"     (Cricks  and  Martin). 


11. 


FILMS.— Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


ing,  and  the  acting  sincere  and  good.    It  will  be  deemed  a  feature 
in  many  places. 

"DRIFTWOOD."— Released  June  8th.     Length  1.000  feet. 

Leaning  against  the  house,  dirty,  unkempt,  lazy  William  Jessup 
basked  in  the  sunshine.  His  wife  roused  him  and  sent  him  off  to 
look  for  work.  In  the  meantime  an  automobile  party  coming 
down  the  road  suddenly  found  themselves  out  of  water.  They 
called  on  Mrs.  Jessup  for  that  necessary  ingredient.  Little  Miss 
Van  Chesler  took  pity  on  the  woful  plight  of  the  pretty  Mrs. 
Jessup  and  asked  her  parents  to  aid  her.  Meanwhile.  Jessup  by 
the  roadside  saw  the  auto  party,  having  obtained  water,  again  on 
their  way,  and  was  seized  with  the  desire  to  hold  up  the  automobile 
and  rob  its  occupants.  Little  Miss  Van  Chesler  promptly  alighted, 
bringing  with  her  a  bundle  of  groceries  which  the  party  had 
purchased  at  a  neighbouring  store  for  Mrs.  Jessup.  But  Jessup. 
uncertain  of  his  ground,  compelled  the  party  to  carry  the  bag  of 
provisions  to  his  home.  There  he  was  met  by  Mrs.  Jessup,  who 
recognised  her  friends.  The  strain  was  too  much  for  Jessup. 
His  shattered  nerves  gave  way  and  he  decided  on  the  spot  to 
brace  up  and  do  better  in  the  future.  Miss  Van  Chesler  interceded 
on  his  behalf  and  influenced  her  parent  to  give  him  a  position 
about  the  household.  A  month  later  Miss  Van  Chesler  visited 
Mrs.  Jessup,  and  took  her  home,  where  her  unbelieving  eyes  saw 
the  man  whose  name  she  bore  rejuvenated  and  worthy  of  her. 


B.  &  C. 

M.P.  Sales  Agency. 


"THE  GENTLEMAN  RANKER."— Released  July  14th. 
Length  975  feet. 

Herbert  Coventry,  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Thomas  Coventry,  meets 
the  vicar's  daughter,  Jocelyn,  and  fails  in  love  with  her.  His 
proud  father  orders  him  to  give  up  his  mad  folly  or  leave  his 
house  for  ever.  Herbert  decides  upon  the  latter  course,  and, 
taking  his  destiny  in  his  own  hands,  joins  a  cavalry  regiment  as 
plain  Trooper  Herbert  Coventry.  After  a  time  the  native  followers 
of  the  Mad  Mahdi  become  troublesome,  and  the  King's  Hussars 
are  sent  to  the  front.  Herbert  is  attached  to  a  small  outpost  which 
is  surprised.  The  last  cartridge  is  fired  and  Herbert  is  prepared 
to  sell  his  life  dearly.  The  Arabs  are  upon  him,  when  reinforce- 
ments arrive,  and  they  are  driven  back.  Invalided  home,  he  is 
welcomed  by  his  father,  who  is  reconciled  to  his  marrying  a 
"plebeian"  wife,  and  all  ends  happily. 

"OUR  PET  DOGS."— Released  July  11th.     Length  381  feet. 
A  fine  film   full  of  interest  for  dog  lovers.     Showing  many  of 
the  winners  at  the  recent  toy  dog  show  at  the  Crystal  Palace. 


BRONCHO. 

Western  Import  Co. 


"FOR  A  WESTERN  GIRL."— Released  June  19th.     Length 
539  feet. 

Jim  is  in  love  with  the  Ranch-owner's  daughter  Rose,  but  has  a 
rival  in  Tom.  Jim  forces  his  attentions,  but  is  repulsed  by  Rose 
On  one  occasion  he  forgets  himself  and  snatches  Rose  in  his  strong 
arms  and  kisses  her.  Tom,  hearing  Rose's  screams,  runs  to  her 
assistance  and  soundly  thrashes  Jim.  Rose's  father,  hearing  the 
tumult,  arrives  on  the  scene.  He  at  once  pays  Jim  off.  Jim,  full 
of  revenge,  seeks  out  some  renegade  Indians  and  they  waylay  Rose 
and  Tom  whilst  they  are  out  riding.  Tom  sends  a  message  home 
by  his  clever  horse.  The  cowboys  are  called  up,  and  they  go  to 
the  rescue.  After  most  exciting  riding  and  hair-breadth  escapes,  the 
couple  are  eventually  rescued  and  Tom  gets  his  reward 


Released    June    26th. 


"YOUNG      DEER'S     RETURN. 
Length  588  feet. 

Young  Deer  is  selected  by  the  Commissioners  for  training  at 
Carlisle  College.  He  becomes  a  hero  in  the  football  field  and  is 
introduced  to  a  fair  admirer.  They  become  lovers,  and  on  Young 
Deer  asking  her  father's  consent,  he  is  refused.  He  reminds  him  of 
his  past,  when  Young  Deer  saved  his  life  in  Death's  Valley,  and  to 
prove  his  words  shows  the  watch  that  Bob  had  given  him  The 
father  is  repentant  and  offers  his  hand,  but  Young  Deer  scorns  to 
be  friends  after  the  slight  he  has  suffered  and  returns  to  his  Indian 
camp. 


CLARENDON, 

12,    Charing   Cross    Road,    W.C.- 


"MIND  THE  PAINT."— Released  June  16th.  Length,  475 
feet. 

Mr.  Muddlekins  receives  a  telegram  from  his  wife  informing  him 
of  the  arrival  of  his  aunt.  She  is  a  lady  from  whom  he  has  great 
expectations,  and  Mr.  Muddlekins  decides  that  he  must  spring 
clean  the  house  in  honour  of  her  coming. 

His  first  efforts  with  a  syringe  on  the  windows  are  not  very 
successful,  but  later  he  hits  on  a  good  idea,  and  procuring  some 
bright  yellow  paint,  he  occupies  himself  busily  with  re-decorating 
the  front  railings.  To  keep  off  tormenting  youngsters  he  electrifies 
the  railings,  and  thus  torments  his  tormentors.  When  his  aunt 
arrives  he  forgets  to  switch  off  the  current,  and  the  good  lady 
unconsciously  placing  her  hand  upon  the  railings  receives  a  most 
violent  and  unexpected  shock.  Alas  for  Mr.  Muddlekins' 
expectations  ! 


COSMOPOLITAN, 

Film  House,  Gebrard  Stteet,  W. 


"THE  CURSE  OF  AVARICE."— Released  June  16th. 
Length  1,000  feet. 

A  specially  notable  film  in  several  particulars.  Every  char- 
acter in  the  story  is  taken  by  the  saTe  actor.  The  representations 
are  wonderfully  clever,  the  dramatic  interest  of  the  story  is  well 
sustai  ed,  and  builds  up  naturally.  The  plot  is  novel,  and  the 
photographic  quality  excellent  throughout.  It  is  sure  to  tickle  I  he 
public  taste  for  novelty.     The  Actor  is  Giuseppe  Pinto. 


CINES, 

Charing  Cross  Road. 


"ROSALIE'S  DOWRY." —Released  June  15th.  Length 
833  feet. 

This  story  is  developed  amid  beautiful  scenes  of  pastoral 
simplicity  in  a  little  Italian  village  where  the  tending  of  cattle 
and  the  tilling  of  the  land  are  the  chief  industries.  Rosalie  is  a 
typical  village  maiden  in  the  first  blush  of  youth  and  happy  i  the 
love  of  her  village  admirer.  They  confess  their  love  for  each 
other  on  the  slopes  of  a  beautiful  mountain,  surrounded  by  all  the 
charms  of  Nature,  on  a  summer's  day.  Their  poverty  is  the  one 
impediment  to  their  immediate  union,  but  Rosalie  is  full  of  the 
hope  of  persuading  her  rich  old  uncle  to  give  her  the  requisite 
dowry.  She  leaves  her  lover  and  hurries  away  to  her  uncle 
Stephen,  to  whom  she  tells  her  love  story.  He  is  a  miser  and 
loves  money  above  everything,  and  resolutely  refuses  to  help  the 
lovers.  Rosalie  pleads  with  him  without  in  any  way  shaking  his 
purpose,  and  she  leaves  him  with  a  breaking  heart  and 
makes  her  way  to  the  mountains,  where  she  sits  down  and  sobs 
out  her  disappointment.  A  stranger  accosts  her  and  begs  to 
know  the  cause  of  her  tears.  She  tells  him  her  story,  dwelling 
upon  the  harshness  of  her  uncle,  who  will  not  spare  a  little  from 
his  wealth  to  make  two  hearts  happy. 

The  stranger  tells  her  to  dry  her  tears  and  let  him  know  the 
amount  of  money  the  dowry  should  consist  of.  He  gives  her 
notes  to  the  amount  and  bids  her  run  off  and  tell  her  lover. 
Meanwhile  Stephen  and  the  village  worthies  are  in  deep  conclave 
owing  to  the  rumour  of  the  proximity  of  the  noted  bandit,  Pi ddu. 
In  the  midst  of  their  conferences  the  bandit  appears  and  with  a 
pistol  in  each  hand  terrorises  them,  while  he  denounces  Stephen 
as  a  coward  and  traitor  and  then  takes  his  departure.  Rosalie  arrives 
and  shows  her  notes  which  the  mysterious  stranger  had  given  her 
as  a  dowry.  The  old  miser  pretends  they  are  forgeries  and  sends 
the  disappointed  Rosalie  away  crying.  Three  months  elapse  and 
once  more  Rosalie  meets  the  mysterious  stranger,  who  turns  out 
to  be  the  dreaded  bandit,  Piddu.  He  learns  how  her  uncle  had 
imposed  upon  her,  bids  her  cheer  up,  and  gives  her  another 
bundle  of  notes,  which  he  says  she  will  find  all  right.  Full  of 
rage  at  the  trick  played  upon  Rosalie  by  the  old  miser,  he  proceeds 
to  Stephen's  house,  where  he  sees  him  through  the  window,  and 
drawing  his  revolver,  shoots  him,  thus  summarily  punishing  him 
for  attempting  to  deprive  Rosalie  of  her  dowry. 


,  1912. 


FILMS.— Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


111. 


"THE  VISITING  CARD  "—Released  June  15th.    Length  620 

Felix  is  very  much  infatuated  with  the  charms  of  a  lovely 
Countess,  who  flirts  with  him  and  then  disappears.  She  is 
betrothed  to  the  Count  of  Roccobosa,  who  arrives  after  the 
Countess  has  left,  meets  Felix,  with  whom  he  exchanges  visiting 
cards.  Felix  rushes  off  to  discover  the  Countess  and  traces  her 
to  an  hotel  in  a  neighbouring  town.  He  enters  and  takes  rooms, 
giving  a  visiting  card  to  the  commissionaire.  He  is  entered  on  the 
books  as  the  Count  of  Roccobosa.  A  traveller  in  cutlery  also 
takes  rooms  and  occupies  those  next  to  the  Countess.  Felix  and 
the  Countess  meet,  and  she  endeavours  to  persuade  him  to 
return  home.  He  promises,  however,  not  to  make  love  to  her, 
and  she  allows  him  to  take  her  into  dinner. 

The  Countess's  maid  sees  the  name  of  the  Cou  it  of  Roccobosa 
on  the  hotel  books  and  tells  her  mistress  that  her  lover  has 
followed  her.  She  retires  to  her  room  and  hears  the  traveller  in 
the  next  room  sharpening  up  his  cutlery  samples,  and  imagines  it 
is  her  lover  getting  ready  to   kill  her  for  flirting  with  Felix.     She 


the  Australian  Bush  and  cannot  alter  his  rough,  uncouth  ways. 
Rose  has  refused  him  and  the  young  squire  has  had  to  order  him 
out  of  the  farmhouse.  .  The  girl  is  her  father's  right  hand  and 
always  delivers  the  products  of  the  farm.  Unfortunately,  on  one 
of  her  journeys  the  wheel  of  her  cart  comes  off  and  she  is  stranded 
in  a  lonely  lane.  Her  Australian  suitor,  out  driving,  pulls  up  and 
offers  acsistance,  which  is  accepted  by  her ;  but  he  exceeds  his  mis- 
sion, and  after  delivering  the  girl's  goods,  drives  her,  with  all  speed, 
to  his  own  house,  where  he  forcibly  tries  to  make  her  promise  to 
marry  him.  She  absolutely  refuses,  and  he  locks  her  in  the  room. 
They  have  been  followed  by  the  young  squire,  who,  when  his  rival 
leaves  the  house  to  stable  his  horse,  climbs  into  the  room.  A 
plan  of  escape  is  decided  upon  and,  locking  the  door,  together 
they  make  a  rope  of  the  bedclothing  and  the  girl  is  safely  lowered 
to  the  ground.  Meanwhile,  the  farmer  has  returned,  hears  the 
noise,  and  rushes  to  the  room  only  to  find  the  door  bolted.  In- 
furiated, he  draws  his  revolver  and  blows  off  the  bolts,  and,  thus 
gaining  admission,  a  terrible  fight  between  the  two  men  takes 
place.     In  their  madness  they  get  too  close  to  the  low  window  and 


THEIR      LIVES    FOR    CO!   1) 


(Gaumont) 


raises  a  terrible  hubbub,  and'the"'  hotel  :manager~with  the  servants 
and  guests  appear,  and  endeavour  to  open  the  traveller's 
Joor.  He  had  gone  to  bed  and  locked  himself  in.  The  door  is 
3i-oken  open.  The  Countess  rushes  in  and  attempts  to  throw  her 
rms  round  the  poor  bewildered  traveller,  when  she  discovers  her 
listake,  and  they  are  all  convulsed  with  laughter  at  the  sight  of 
the  traveller  sitting  up  in  bed  endeavouring  to  repel  the  advances 
A  the  lovely  Countess.  Thus  a  contemplated  tragedy  is  turned 
into  the  broadest  corned  v. 


CRICKS  &  MARTIN, 


ioi,  Wardoi'r  Street,  W. 


Ltd. 


"THE  FARMER'S  DAUGHTER."— Released  June  [29th. 
Length  975  feet.  v 

Farmer  Jones  has  a  very  pretty  daughter  who  is  much  sought 
after.  The  young  squire  is  first  favourite,  but  she  dearly  loves  to 
tease  him  and  loses  no  opportunity  to  do  so.  But  he  has  a  rival 
in  a  neighbouring  farmer  who  has  spent  many  years  of  his  life  in 


both  fallout-  The"  villain  falls  heavily  to  the  ground  badly  hurt, 
but,  fortunately,  the  young  squire  catches  in  the  ivy  and  lowers 
himself  to  the  ground,  little  the  worse  for  his  adventure,  and  is 
welcomed  by  "The  Farmers  Daughter." 

"  COLD  STEEL."— Released  June  20th.     Length  825  feet. 

A  lady  is  distressed  at  her  husband's  coolness  and  tries  hard  to 
bring  about  an  alteration.  She  is  most  despondent  at  not  being 
successful,  and  her  unhappiness  is  noticed  by  Terance  Astor,  a  young 
artist  friend  who,  in  his  passion,  foolishly  writes  inviting  her  to 
take  shelter  under  his  protection.  The  unhappy  wife,  although 
most  wishful  to  be  happy,  sensibly  sees  that  such  action  would 
only  make  matters  worse,  but  decides  to  call  upon  the  artist  and 
explain  how  impossible  such  an  action  would  be.  The  meeting  is 
most  pathetic,  but,  in  her  hurry  to  keep  the  appointment,  she  leaves 
the  letter  behind,  which  is  found  by  her  husband.  Thinking  his 
wife  unfaithful,  he  bluntly  accuses  her  and  orders  her  out  of  the 
house.  Proceeding  to  the  artist's  studio,  he  will  not  accept  the 
artist's  explanation,  and,  seeing  a  pair  of  foils,  compels  the  artist  to 
fight.  In  a  most  realistic  combat  he  is  getting  well  beaten  when 
the  wife  enters  and  parts  them,  and  the  husband  is  assured  of  her 
honourable   intentions   in  keeping   the   appointment.     Convinced 


IV. 


FILMS.— Supphment  to   THE  CINEMA. 


Jink,   1912. 


"  the    black    wall  "     (Vitagraph). 

and  well  beaten  in  the  fight,  he  forgives  the  artist  for  his  actions 
and  learns  the  lesson  that  "to  be  happy  though  married  '  a 
woman  needs  a  husband  to  be  more  than  "  Cold  Steel." 


ECLAIR. 

Tvler  Film  Co. 


"THE  LOVE  OF  A  CHILD."— Released  June  13th. 
Length  1,900  feet. 

This  is  a  film  of  unique  character.  It  is  based  upon  the  intensity 
of  childish  affection  and  remembrance,  and  the  suffering  which  may 
follow  when  these  strong  emotions  are  outraged.  The  little  child 
heroine  is  a  wonderfully  clever  actress  and  her  adventures  re- 
produce for  us  pictorially  the  atmosphere  which  has  made  the 
child  stories  of  writers  like  Hans  Andersen  classics  the  world 
over.  The  mother  and  step-father,  too,  carry  off  their  parts 
magnificentiv, 


EXPRESS. 

Warwick  Trading  Company. 


-Released  June  27th. 


"THE  LIFE  OF  THE  KALMUCKS.' 
Length  355  feet. 

The  opening  scene  of  this  series  of  views  shows  a  band  of  a 
wandering  tribe  of  Asiatic  Russia  on  the  march  through  the  snow 
with  their  dromedaries  and  baggage.  Having  found  a  suitable 
spot  for  the  erection  of  their  flimsy  tents,  they  are  seen  in  the 
performance  of  their  religious  duties,  receiving  the  blessing  of  the 
priest  before  a  rudely  constructed  altar  in  the  open  air.  Follow- 
ing this  are  exhibitions  of  various  styles  of  dancing  peculiar  to  the 
tribe,  and  then  the  striking  of  tents  for  another  move  on  the 
endless  route  of  their  nomadic  existence. 


ESSANAY 

CO., 

5>  Wardour  Street 

\v. 

"OUT    OF   THE    NIGHT."— Released   June  30th. 
990  feet. 


Length 


A  finely  played  drama,  introducing  a  novel  half  real  life,  half 
dream  effect,  which  is  admirably  done  and  adds  considerably  to 
the  interest  of  the  play.  Howard  Moore,  a  millionaire  clubman, 
returns  home  one  evening  to  learn  that  his  entire  fortune  has  been 
swept  away  in  the  crash  of  the  Eagle  National  Bank.  The  news 
almost  drives  him  insane,  but  the  fact  that  his  fiancee  has  read  of 
his  misfortune  and  returns  his  engagement  ring  heartlessly  is  the 
thing  that  causes  him  to  seek  solace  in  the  whiskey  decanter,  then 
determines  to  end  it  all.  The  revolver  is  raised'  to  his  temple, 
when  a  tapping  is  heard  outside  the  large  French  window,  and 
Moore  is  astonished  to  see  a  ragged  derelict  beckoning  for  admission 
and  protection  from  the  biting  air  Moore  admits  the  poor 
unfortunate,  who  has  seen  Moore  raise  the  gun,  and  questions  him. 
The  clubman  shows  him  the  newspaper  and   letter  bitterly,  and 


then  is  amazed  when  the  fellow  begins  to  relate  a  story  almost 
identical  with  his  own.  While  the  two  men  remain  seated  at  the 
table  the  story  is  revealed  in  a  beautiful  vis:on — how  the  young 
man  was  on  the  road  to  wealth  in  the  Stock  Market,  engaged  to  a 
beautiful  girl,  then  of  his  fortune  being  swept  away  in  a  panic,  his 
engagement  broken  by  the  heartless  vampire  who  scorns  him,  his 
seeking  consolation  in  drink,  his  course  on  the  downward  road 
until  he  has  become  what  he  is — a  helpless,  ragged  derelict.  The 
story  finished,  the  outcast  begs  Moore  to  give  up  whiskey  and 
make  a  man  of  himself.  Moore  promises,  allows  the  whiskey  to 
run  out  over  the  floor,  tears  the  girl's  face  from  the  frame  on  the 
table,  grips  the  derelict's  hand,  rewards  him  with  a  bill,  then 
watches  him  vanish  into  the  night  from  whence  he  came. 

"  NAPATIA,  THE  GREEK    SINGER."—  Released  July  4th, 
Length  992  feet." 

A  heart  story  which  makes  a  strong  appeal.  Billy  Arnold,  a 
young  fireman,  saves  Napatia,  a  beautiful  Greek  street-singer  from 
the  brutality  of  her  foster-father  one  day  and  falls  deeply  in  love 
with  her.  He  manages  to  meet  her  several  times,  and  one 
morning  is  overjoyed  when  shj  comes  with  her  foster-father  and 
sings  before  the  engine-house.  Billy's  companions  joke  him 
good-naturedly  about  Napatia,  but  he  tells  them  it  is  no  joke  and 
.that  he  intends  making  Napatia  his  wife  if  possible.  A  few  days 
later  Billy  meets  Napatia  before  her  home  and  takes  her  for  a 
walk.  Coming  upon  an  alarm-box,  Billy  shows  her  how  to  work 
it  and  tells  her  if  she  is  ever  in  trouble  and  needs  him  to  send  in 
an  alarm.  A  moment  later  the  venomous  foster-father  appears, 
rages  at  finding  Napatia  with  Billy  and  attempts  to  strike  her. 
Billy  instantly  knocks  him  down,  warns  him  to  cease  his  brutality 
toward  the  girl  and  watches  them  leave.  Napatia  pays  for  her 
walk  with  Billy  by  being  imprisoned  in  an  attic  room  by  her 
enraged  foster-parents  Frantically  she  tries  to  escape,  but  cannot 
Suddenly  she  thinks  of  Billy's  promise  to  come  to  her  in  time  of 
need.  Gathering  an  armful  of  paper  she  sets  it  on  fire  and  holds 
it  near  the  window.  A  pedestrian  sees  the  blaze,  turns  in  an 
alarm,  and  the  department  quickly  responds.  Billy  and  his 
companions  burst  into  the  house,  frighten  the  foster-parents  out  of 
their  wits,  break  into  the  attic  room,  and  Napatia  throws  herself 
into  Billy's  arms  and  confesses  what  she  has  done  to  bring  him. 
At  this  moment  chief  Ryan  strides  in,  the  situation  is  explained, 
and  Ryan,  with  a  twinkle  in  his  eye,  tells  Napatia  and  Billy  to 
hustle  out  to  the  nearest  marriage-licence  bureau,  then  gives  orders 
for  the  boys  to  turn  the  hose  on  the  enraged  foster-parents  if  they 
make  a  move  to  interfere.     [Sice  alsopa^c  x.) 


FILM    D'ART. 

J.   F.   Brockliss. 


"  BONNY  PRINCE  CHARLIE."— Released  July  3rd.  Length 
1.S00  feet. 

Prince  Charles  Edward,  son  of  James  II.,  otherwise  known  as 
Bonny  Prince  Charlie  by  his  followers,  or  the  Young  Pretender 
by  his  opponents,  is  seen  landing  in  Scotland  after  a  lengthy  exile  in 
France.  He  is  welcomed  by  blind  Angus  and  his  daughter,  who 
are  most  anxious  to  assist  him  in  regaining  the  throne  of  his 
ancestors.  But  the  head  of  the  most  important  clan  is  somewhat 
indifferent  to  the  Prince's  claim,  and  is  only  persuaded  to  give  his 
support  and  that  of  his  kinsmen  by  the  entreaties  of  his  wife, 
Dora.  A  charming  romance  runs  through  the  film,  which  should 
be  a  most  popular  one  with  all  classes. 


GAUMONT  CO., 

5-6.  Sherwood  Street,  W. 


"THEIR  LIVES  FOR  GOLD."— Released  June  23rd. 
Length  1,470  feet. 

A  story  full  of  real  thrills,  and  a  railway  smash  which 
makes'  it  a  top  liner  and  worthy  a  big  boom.  Two  friends, 
Joe  Baker  and  Tom  Burke,  prospecting  for  gold,  chance 
upon  the  body  of  a  man  apparently  lifeless.  Raising  him, 
they  find  the  vital  spark  is  not  quite  out,  so  hoisting  him  on  to 
Joe's  back,  Tom  bringing  along  the  miner's  tools,  they  make 
tracks  for  their  shanty.  On  reaching  shelter  the  starved  miner 
recovers  consciousness  for  a   few   moments,   and  anxious  to  make 


June,  191 2. 


FILMS.— Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


some  return  to  his  would-be  rescuers,  tells  them  the  secret  of  an 
old  mine  in  which  he  declares  there  is  still  a  large  deposit  of 
gold  .  he  draws  a  plan  in  Joe's  pocket-book  explaining  the  position 
ottne  hoard.  Immediately  on  completing  his  drawing  the  miner 
an;,  oack  dead.  Both  men  make  a  snatch  at  the  precious  pocket- 
oooh  containing  the  plan,  and  Baker  obtaining  possession,  refuses 
to  part  with  it.  Friends  no  longer,  Joe  and  Tom,  with  the  greed  of 
gold  in  their  veins,  begin  the  dramatic  race  to  the  mine.  Thev 
can  agree  on  nothing,  but  Joe,  being  in  possession  of  the  plan,  holds 
the  trump  card  ;  never  once  will  Tom  let  Joe  out  of  his  sight, 
ano  as  joe  will  not  agree  to  any  question  of  division,  Tom  decides 

road-Tnrf l7air(?h  k"  *?*'  antl- hirinfc'  a  buggy,  slips  off  to  the  rail- 
road and  luckily  boards  a  train  running  in  the  right  direction. 

joe,  catching  Tom  in  the  act  of  stealing  away  in  the  early 
norning,  gets  his  horse  from  the  stable  and  dashes  off  in  pursuit  ; 
-  ,^rin8  a  short  c"t  he  manages  to  catch  the  slow-going  train, 
ana  lorn,  seeing  him  in  pursuit,  has  one  or  two  shots  at  him,  but 
tne  jolting  unsteadies  his  hand,  and  Joe  reaches  the  rear 
piatiorm  of  the  train.  The  advantage  is,  however,  with  Tom,  and 
ne  snows  no  compunction,  after  a  short  struggle,  in  throwing  Joe 
rrom  the  train.  Joe,  unhurt,  but  filled  with  a  determination  to 
leieat  his  enemy  at  all  costs,  mounts  his  horse  and  makes  a  bee- 
nne  through  the  swamps,  intent  on  cutting  off  the  train,  which  has 
to  make  a  long  detour  to  avoid  the  treacherous  ground 
.,,su,cce  edf  ,n  'lis  object,  and  reaches  a  signal  on  a 
ootondge  which  runs  right  across  the  line  ;  without  hesitation 
1  c,lmbs  "P  the  ladder,  and,  clambering  over  the  rail, 
drops  on  to  the  roof  of  the  train  as  it  passes  underneath.  He 
crawls  along  the  roofs  of  the  carriages  until  he  almost  reaches  the 
engine:  the  drivers  mate  sees  him,  and  climbs  on  to  the  roof  to 
dislodge  him.  A  violent  struggle  ensues;  first  one  and  then  the 
other  01  the  combatants  is  undermost,  but  eventually  Joe  gets  the 
upper  hand,  and  pushes  the  stoker  on  to  the  line.  From  the  roof 
01  the  carriage  to  the  cab  of  the  engine  is  easy  work,  but 
me  driver  has  to  be  disposed  of;  Joe,  who  'has  already 
he  death  of  the  stoker  on  his  hands,  does  not  hesitate 
o  shoot  the  unfortunate  driver.  Taking  possession  of  the 
engine,  the  next  step  is  to  uncouple  the  train  ;  this  is  soon  done, 
and  joe  proceeds  on  his  dash  for  the  mine.  Tom  is,  as  we 
have  seen,  a  passenger  by  the  stranded  train,  and  directly  he  hears 
trom  the  officials  the  cause  of  the  stoppage,  he  sets  off  across 
country  and  manages  to  reach  Fort  William,  where  he  procures  a 
motor  car.  He  too  knows  the  country,  and  makes  to  intercept  the 
runaway  engme  at  a  level  crossing.  Taking  from  his  car  two  very 
nea\y  sleepers,  he  places  them  on  the  rails  so  Joe,  who  is  unable 
lo  control  and  drive  the  engine,  will  get  wrecked.  That  Tom's 
expectations  are  correct  is  soon  obvious,  and  Joe,  badly  hurt  in  the 
smash  only  just  manages  to  crawl  awav.  Tom  reaches  the  mine 
nrst  but  Joe  s  determination  carries  him  through,  and  he  also 
reaches  the  treasure  trove.  He  finds  Tom  at  work,  and  jealousy 
at  his  friend's  success  sets  the  devil  in  him  working  again.  He 
collects  the  blasting  powder  that  is  used  in  the  mine,  and  on  Tom's 
return  from  work  fires  it.  Thus  ends  the  race  that  was  started  bv 
avarice,  continued   by  crime,  and  finished  in  ignominious  death. 


OF      DEATH. 


Released    June    20th. 


"THE     SIGNAL 
Length  813  feet. 

0lVue  t.errace  faciuK  the  sea  a  young  girl  lying  seriously  ill  is 
visited  by  the  doctor,  who  after  examining  her  informs  her  relatives 
that  recovery  is  impossible  ;  her  death  is  simply  a  matter  of  days. 
She,  however,    becomes  quite   resigned   to  her   fate,  and  one   day 


"  THE  DEVIL,  THE  SERVANT,  AND  THE  MAN  "  {Selig). 

requests  her  mother  to  buy  some  of  her  favourite  flowers. 
During  the  absence  of  her  mother  a  fortune-teller  pays  a  visit  and 
offers  to  read  her  hand.  She  at  first  refuses  to  accede  to  the 
request,  but  after  some  persuasion  informs  the  gipsy  that  her  days 
are  numbered,  and  inquires  whether  she  can  say  -how  much  longer 
she  has  to  live.  The  cards  are  cut,  and  after  a  certain  amount  of 
calculation  she  is  informed  that  she  will  die  when  the  lilies  blossom. 
The  invalid's  mother  when  out  driving  meets  a  flower  seller,  and 
remembering  her  daughter's  wish  purchases  a  large  bouquet,  un- 
consciously including  some  lilies.  Upon  arriving  home  she 
presents  the  flowers  to  her  daughter,  and  is  astonished  to  see  the 
immediate  change  in  her  appearance.  Assistance  is  proffered,  but 
all  efforts  are  useless  ;   the  gipsy's  prophecy  has  come  true. 

"A     MATRIMONIAL     VENTURE."— Released   June    23rd. 
Lengtli  636  feet. 

Desirous  of  contracting  a  rich  marriage,  Mr  Ledaim  visits  a  matri- 
monial agency,  and  is  shown  a  letter  from  a  rich  Americ  n  widow 
possessing  a  large  sum  of  money,  who  requires  a  husband,  gentle, 
loving  and  obedient.  This  is  exactly  the  kind  of  wife  he  is  looking 
for,  and  he  loses  no  time  in  calling  at  the  widow's  house  and  mak- 
ing her  an  offer  of  marriage.  The  rich  American  deciding  to  give 
him  a  trial,  takes  him  into  the  wood-yard  and  shows  him  a  large 
stack  of  wood,  requesting  him  to  see  how  quickly  he  can  saw  it 
into  suitable  sized  logs.  This  is  not  the  work  required  by  a  man 
dressed  in  immaculate  attire,  but,  however,  he  sets  to  work  and 
finishes  the  sawing  some  hours  later.  The  widow  now  inquires 
whether  he  is  fond  of  children,  and  receiving  a  reply  in  the 
affirmative,  introduces  him  to  the  nursery,  which  is  full  of  children 
Mr.  Ledaim  tries  his  hand  at  minding  children,  but  has  to  g  ve  up 
the  task  as  hopeless.  Another  surprise  is  in  store.  A  boxer  now 
arrives,  and  proceeds  to  give  Mr.  Ledaim  a  thrashing,  to  the 
evident  enjoyment  of  the  widow.  These  trials  being  over,  he  is 
now  presented  with  a  letter  stating  that  the  widow  put  him  through 
the  tests  simply  to  provide  a  little  amusement,  and  that  she  has  no 
desire  to  get  married.  Noticing  the  manner  in  which  he  received  this 
information,  her  feelings  change,  and  she  agrees  to  accept  the  hand 
of  the  suitor. 


HEPWIX, 

Denmas  Street,  W, 


THE    DEVIL,    THE    SERVANT,    AND   THE    MAN"    (Scltg) 


"  OH  !     FOR    A    SMOKE."— Released   June    16th,      Length 
-125  feet. 

Mike  has  been  at  work  all  day  in  the  factory,  and  all  the  time 
his  great  desire  has  been  for  a  smoke,  which,  of  course,  is  quite  out 
of  the  question  while  he  is  at  work.  At  last,  however,  work  is 
over,  and  Mike  instantly  starts  to  light  up,  but  just  as  he  is  getting 
the  first  draw,  one  of  liis  mates  accidentally  knocks  his  clay  pipe 
out  of  his  hand,  and  it  falls  broken  to  the  ground.  Mike  at  once 
rushes  off  to  the  nearest  tobacconist's  and  buying  a  fresh  supply  of 
clav  pipes,  sets  out  again.  But  there  seems  to  be  a  fate  on  Mike 
and  his  pipes.  The  first  is  broken  by  a  man  on  horseback,  who 
dismounting  just  at  the  moment  that  Mike  is  stooping  to  light  his 
pipe,  stepson  to  his  back.  One  after  another  catastrophes  over- 
take the  pipes  ;  a  lady  knocks  one  out  of  his  mouth  with  a  parasol 
a  passing  newsboy  runs  into  him  and  breaks  another,  and  a  cycl 


FILMS.— Supplement  to  THE  CINEMA. 


June,  1912. 


knocking  him  down  accounts  for  a  third,  until  Mike  is  almost  in 
despair  of  ever  getting  his  much-desired  smoke.  At  last,  he  seeks 
refuge  in  a  railway  carriage,  but  has  no  better  fortune  here  than 
anywhere  else,  for  just  as  he  is  lighting  up,  the  other  inmates  of 
the  carriage,  a  stern-visaged  female  and  an  uncompromising 
parson,  call  his  attention  to  the  fact  that  it  is  not  a  smoking  com- 
partment, and  sternly  threaten  him  with  all  sorts  of  penalties  if  he 
should  disobey  the  Byelaws.  Mike  leaves  the  train  at  the  next 
station,  and  determined  to  find  a  quiet  place,  climbs  up  into  an  old 
willow  tree,  overhanging  a  stream,  but  even  here  misfortune  over- 
takes him.  The  bough  breaks,  and  Mike  falls  with  a  resounding 
splash  in  the  water.  However,  determined  not  to  be  outdone, 
Mike  lights  up  whilst  in  the  stream,  and  we  get  a  final  view  of  him 
floating  clown  with  the  current  emitting  large  clouds  of  smoke, 
happy  at  last ! 

"THE  ROBBERY  AT  OLD  BURNSIDE  BANK,  —Re- 
leased June  20th.     Length  750  feet. 

In  the  early  hours  of  a  bright  spring  morning  in  May.  the  bank 
at  Old  Burnside  is  broken  into  by  a  couple  of  thieves.  They 
force  the  outer  doors  and  are  soon  inside  at  work  upon  the  safes. 
Just  as  they  have  got  one  of  them  open  they  make  a  noise  which 
disturbs  the  watchman,  who  rushes  in  and  catches  them  red-handed. 
Without  a  moment's  hesitation  the  two  ruffians  shoot  him  down, 
and  a  policeman  who  attempts  to  stop  them  at  the  bank  doors 
meets  the  same  fate,  the  pair  of  rogues  rapidly  making  their  escape. 
The  policeman,  however,  who  is  only  wounded  manages,  to  stagger 
into  the  bank,  and  there  telephones  to  the  police  station  for  aid, 
explaining  exactly  what  has  occurred.  The  Inspector  at  the 
station  first  rings  up  the  bank  manager  at  his  house  informing  him 
of  what  has  happened,  and  then  arming  half  a  dozen  of  his  men 
with  revolvers  stts  off  for  the  scene  of  the  crime.  At  the  door  of 
the  bank,  they  meet  the  manager,  who  has  just  arrived  in  his  car, 
and  the  whole  party  getting  on  board,  set  off  in  pursuit  of  the 
thieves. 

The  burglars,  in  the  meantime  have  commandeered  a  small  car 
driven  by  a  young  girl,  whom  they  force  to  drive  them  with  as  much 
speed  as  the  small  powered  engine  is  capable  of.  The  pursuit  goes 
on  for  some  miles,  with  the  large-car  containing  the  police  always, 
gaining,  and  reducing  the  lead  which  the  thieves  had  at  the 
beginning.  At  last  the  girl  can  stand  the  strain  no  longer,  ami  she 
falls  fainting  over  the  steering  wheel.  The  thieves,  who  cannot 
drive  the  car  themselves,  are  forced  to  abandon  it,  and  a  running 
fight  along  the  railway  embankment  ensues  between  them  and 
the  police,  both  sides  using  their  pistols  freely.  From  the  railway 
the  chase  is  carried  on  into  the  yard  of  the  nearest  station,  where 
the  thieves,  entrenching  themselves  behind  a  goods  van,  open  up 
a  furious  fire  with  unfortunately  fatal  results  to  some  of  the  police 
who  have  been  over  bold  in  the  pursuit.  Chased  from  here,  they 
take  refuge  in  the  signal  box,  and  for  a  time  seem  to  have  obtained 
an  impregnable  position  from  which  it  appears  impossible  to  oust 
them.  A  furious  fire  is  exchanged  between  the  thieves  up  in  the 
box,  and  the  police  on  the  ground  below,  but  at  length  when 
another  policeman  has  paid  the  penalty  of  his  rashness  with  his 
life,  the  Inspector  ordering  that  the  fusillade  shall  be  continued 
from  the  front,  creeps  up  behind  with  two  of  his  men,  and 
manages  to  gain  an  entrance  in  the  rear,  while  the  attention  of  the 
ruffians  is  attracted  to  the  other  side  of  the  building.  The  end 
soon  comes  after  this,  the  pair  are  unceremoniously  tumbled  down 
the  steps,  and  handcuffed.  On  being  searched,  the  stolen  notes 
are  found  in  their  pockets  and  thus  the  final  proof  of  their  guilt  is 
obtained.  The  stolen  property  is  handed  back  to  the  manager  of 
the  bank,  whilst  the  two  ruffians  are  hurried  away  to  their  richly 
deserved  doom. 


HISPANO. 


European   Film    Agency. 


"  TRUE  TILL  DEATH. "—Released  June  8th.  Length  2,625 
feet, 

Don  Pedro  de  Segura's  daughter  Isabel  was  a  young  girl  of  great 
beauty  and  virtue.  An  attachment  had  sprung  up  between  her  and 
a  youth  named  Martin  de  Marsilla,  who  had  been  brought  up  with 
her.  A  rival  suitor,  Don  Rodrigo  de  Azagran,  appears  and 
demands  the  hand  of  Isabel  in  marriage.  Martin  de  Marsilla 
presents  himself  at  the  same  time  and  presents  his  suit.  The 
parents  of  Isabel,  though  inclined  to  favour  him,  do  not  think  him 

present  worthy  of  the  honour.     Thev  therefore  make  an  agree- 

The  Po  iiver  Cameragraph  No.  6,  complete  with  stand,  £40  10s. 
cash,  or  terms  to  suit  your  convenience. 


ment  with  him  that  before  listening  to  his  proposal,  he  must  go 
forth  and  win  for  himself  a  name  and  a  fortune.  Marsilla  accepts 
the  conditions,  and  starts  off  confidentially  in  search  of  glory. 
The  first  part  of  the  film  treats  of  his  adventures,  but  towards  the 
end  the  story  develops  into  a  tragedy,  and  the  two  lovers  are  only 
united  in  death. 


IMP. 


F.J.  Brockliss,  NenvCompton  Stkeet.W, 


"BETTER  THAN  GOLD.  —Released  June  23rd.  Length 
990  feet. 

A  mining  parson,  Jim  Stafford,  harbours  a  young  couple,  who 
repay  his  kindness  by  stealing  his  money  and  running  away, 
leaving  behind  them  their  baby  girl.  Jim  is  a  good  sort,  and  has 
the  child  educated  at  a  convent  school.  Meanwhile  things  go 
from  bad  to  worse  with  the  couple.  The  woman  becomes 
seriouslv  ill,  and,  the  maternal  instinct  still  strong  in  her  breast, 
she  deter  1  ines  to  make  an  effort  to  see  her  child  before  she  dies. 
The  girl  is  on  her  way  home,  having  finished  her  education.  On 
her  arrival  she  finds  that  her  mother  has  passed  away,  and  hand 
in  hand  the  girl  and  the  parson  visit  the  grave  of  the  unhappy 
woman.  The  school  girl  has  become  a  woman,  and  when  both 
learn  the  truth,  lonely  pardon  Jim  finds  a  future  wife  in  the  little 
waif  that  was  entr.  sted  to  him  so  manv  vears  before. 


ITALA. 


Tyler   Film    Co. 


"THE  NUMEROUS  FAMILY  AT  THE  PHILANTHRO- 
PIST'S."—Released  June  23rd.     Length  620  feet. 

A  numerous  family  violently  ejected  from  their  home  were 
accorded  hospitality  by  a  philanthropist.  The  good  man,  to  the 
astonishment  of  his  servants,  instals  the  family  in  the  best  room 
and  provides  the  children  with  a  supply  of  toys.  In  spite  of  the 
rebellious  attitude  of  the  servants  they  are  compelled  to  attend  to 
the  needs  of  the  family,  who  soon  transform  the  beautiful  room  into 
a  fearful  condition.  The  mother  industriously  engages  herself  with 
the  family  washing,  father  bangs  away  at  various  jobs,  and  the 
children  play  the  very  deuce  with  the  handsome  furniture  and  bric- 
a-brac.  The  uproar  created  by  the  family  finally  gets  to  such  a 
pitch  that  all  the  neighbouring  people  decide  to  leave.  This  is 
more  than  the  philanthropist  bargained  for,  and  he  is  reluctantly 
compelled  to  order  the  family  to  quit. 


KALEM. 


M.P.